Soldier Spotlight: Sergeant Thomas Burrows

Image: Thomas Burrows, 1939 (SPRA 2005.094.03)

Regiment: R. C. A. M. C. 4th Casualty Clearing Station
Regiment No.: M25812
Rank: Sergeant

Thomas Burrows, born in 1911, arrived in Canada from Glasgow, Scotland in 1927 with his father, Robert Burrows, step-mother, Mary (Pollock) Burrows, and his siblings. The family started farming in the Glen Leslie district, near Bezanson AB. Before the Second World War, Thomas worked on the farm, and for local farmers in Bezanson. He also homesteaded for 3 years in the Fitzsimmons district.

On September 9, 1939 Thomas joined the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps. He was then stationed overseas on January 25, 1940. Due to medical reasons, he was sent home to Edmonton. Diagnosed with lip cancer, he received treatment in England. Thomas returned to Edmonton on February 26, 1941 and then worked at Prince of Wales Armories. After that, he was in Suffield AB at an Experimental Station for 4 ½ years. Thomas was discharged in Calgary on October 1, 1945. Six more of his siblings also served in the war.

Thomas married Vera Rees of Edmonton. Moving back north, the couple farmed in the Crystal Creek district. (Between Bezanson and Grande Prairie.) Then they returned to Edmonton where Thomas worked for the government. He retired in 1975, and they moved to Ladysmith BC, where he passed away 2 years later at age 66. Thomas and Vera had 10 children.

Source: Smoky River to Grande Prairie pp. 422 and 448
AGS Website – Obituary Index
SPRA Family Reference Files – written by Helen Burrows Horrigan, including photo
Source: Smoky River to Grande Prairie pg. 422

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Alfred Cecil Carder

Image: Farmstead at Beaverlodge Experimental Station showing house, gardens, barn and windmill, 1928 (SPRA 107.60)

Rank: Private
Force: Canadian Army

Born in Calgary on April 20, 1910, Al Carder was the fourth of 5 children of John and Harriet Carder. He grew up in the farm area of Cloverdale, BC, and as a young boy was fascinated with plants. In 1935 he had earned his BA and BSc from the University of British Columbia, and found employment at the Experimental Station in Beaverlodge, AB. When the war broke out, he joined the Canadian Army in 1941, and became a private with the Light Anti-Aircraft Division. Mostly he was shooting down enemy planes. Discharged in 1946, Al returned to work in field husbandry at Beaverlodge, later working in forage crop and weed control. Taking a leave from the Experimental Station, he earned his MSc from McGill University in 1948. In 1950 he met his future wife, Mary Elizabeth Wedd Tidman. They were married in 1954 in her hometown of Petersfield, England, and returned to Beaverlodge. The Carders had 3 children who were born there: Judith, Mary-Clare, and Andrew. Also in 1954, Al earned his PhD from University of Wisconsin, and concentrated his studies in the new science of agro-climatology, and his research was on plant responses to climate effects. He received the Canada’s Centennial Medal from the Canadian Department of Agriculture. Al and Mary moved to Cordova Bay (near Victoria BC) in 1970. In his retirement, Al was active in hiking, building a cottage, and doing more research. He wrote and published books about giant trees, and was bestowed the Ancient Forest Alliance’s Forest Sustainability Award. Mary passed away in 2008, and Al died on December 21, 2014, in Victoria at the age of 104.

Source: Family and Personal Life Reference files – GP Archives
Beaverlodge to the Rockies pp. 91-92

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Glen Carpentier

Image: A portion of the newly built Alaska Highway at Ft. St. John, 1942 (SPRA 2000.31.6)

Regiment: Royal Canadian Electric Mechanics

Born in Saskatchewan, to parents Charles and Alma Carpentier, Glen was one of 9 siblings. His family moved in 1930 to Little Smoky AB area, and later they moved to New Fish Creek (Valleyview area). From 1935 to 1942 Glen worked on Highway 34 as a road grader with four mules, and was known as “Mule Man.” He married Chrissie Cunningham from Little Smoky in June 1940 in Grande Prairie. Coming home from their honeymoon, they found their log cabin (on Glen’s homestead called “Sleepy Hollow”) on fire. With help of wonderful neighbours, a new house was constructed in 4 days. After two years they moved to Vancouver Island. There Glen joined the army with the RCEM, and he was posted in England. In 1946, after his discharge, the Carpentiers returned to New Fish Creek, and Glen obtained more land through Veterans’ Land Act (VLA). In their new house they had 3 children: Kathy, Gary, and Susan. Chrissie died in 1956 from cancer, and Glen remarried in 1957 to Katherine, a widow with 5 children. Glen worked for the town of High Prairie, then for the Alberta government maintenance department. In 1960, he began a job on the Alaska Highway as maintenance equipment operator for the Canadian Army. Fourteen years later, when Glen was disabled, he and his wife retired in Sicamous BC.

Source: Where the Red Willow Grew pp. 420-422 Photo pp. 420 and 421
Grande Prairie Herald Tribune – June 13, 1940 p. 6 c. 4 (marries)
Grande Prairie Herald Tribune – June 23, 1956 p. 3 c. 5 (wife dies)

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: George Telford Cameron

Image: The returning Sexsmith soldiers after WWII. Back – Bill Card, Dan Rycroft, Simon Haakstad, Jack Campbell, Andy Innes, George Cameron, Dale Harris, T. Copeland, Samuelson. Middle – J. Bond, G. Gerow, E. McDonald, G. Rix, Scotty Boyd, J. Siluch, Bryce Burns, L. Rasmussan, D. McNaughton, T. Forsythe Front – Jack Waters, H. Knight, B.Brown, L. White, C. Foote, C. Thomson, D. Wright, B. Murray, G. Kusyk, B. Moody, G. McQuitty, J. Thorpe. Photographer’s stamp: Art Craft, Grande Prairie, Alta. 1945 (SPRA 644.01.08)

George Cameron was the stepson of William Umbach, and his step-brother was Norman Umbach who also served in WW II. In 1933 he moved (from Edmonton) to Sexsmith AB, taking a position at Sexsmith Supplies Ltd. Also he took over the hardware and machinery in the L. C. Howard Hardware Store in Sexsmith which his step-father purchased in 1930 for George and Norman. Being a hockey goalie previously in Calgary and Edmonton, he joined the Sexsmith Hockey Club, and soon became the manager. George was married in 1936 to Gertha Hillman of Sexsmith, and they had 2 daughters, Donna and Heather. After serving in the Armed Forces in WW II from 1940 to 1945, George returned to Sexsmith and the hardware business, which he eventually sold in 1956. George was active in social and athletic activities, especially baseball. Gertha died in 1971. Remarrying in 1978 to Dorothy McDonald (McMillan), George and his new wife moved to Fort Saskatchewan AB. He passed away at age 71, in 1981, in Fort Saskatchewan.

Source: Wagon Trails Grown Over p. 715, p. 1149 – name in Roll of Honour, p. 1162 – Photo
AGS Website – Obituary Index
Northern Tribune Oct. 26, 1933 p. 4 c. 1
Northern Tribune Feb. 8, 1934 p. 4 c. 2
Northern Tribune Sept 3, 1936 p. 4,7 c. 1,4

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Gunner George Burrows

Image: George Burrows, 1940 (SPRA 2005.094.07)

Regiment: Royal Canadian Horse Artillery
Regiment No.: M/66193
Rank: Gunner

George Burrows was born in Glasgow, Scotland on September 9, 1923. He came to Canada with his parents, Robert and Mary (Pollock) Burrows, and siblings in 1927, and they settled on a farm in the Glen Leslie district by Bezanson AB. He attended the Somme School from 1930 to 1939, and then worked and stayed on the farm until he enlisted in WW II in 1941. (7 Burrows/Pollock siblings served in WW II). Signing up in Edmonton, he took basic training in Camrose AB, and then to Brandon MB, and Sussex NB. George joined the R.C.H. Artillery and was posted overseas to different parts of England. In July 1944 he sailed for France and was wounded while serving in Belgium, and spent time in hospital. He returned to his regiment just 2 weeks before the end of the war. Going back to Holland, he stayed there until he was discharged February 6, 1946. George also served in the Korean War from 1950 to 1952, and in the Peacetime Army from 1956 to 1959. He moved to Victoria BC, and then to Calgary AB, where he died in the Holy Cross Hospital on February 17, 1992, at age 68. He was buried in the Field of Honor in Queen’s Park Cemetery in Calgary.

Source: Smoky River to Grande Prairie p. 448
p. 422 Photo as child with siblings David, Leslie and Helen
G.P. Daily Herald Tribune February 27, 1992 – Obituary
SPRA Family Reference Files – information written by Helen Burrows Horrigan (sister) – photo of George in uniform

Portrait and biographical information available here

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Arthur “Archie” Calliou

Image: Grande Prairie Friendship Centre Float, 1979 (SPRA 190.02.01.0288.136)

Regiment: British 6th Airborne (Artillery) Division

Archie Calliou was born around 1924 in the Flying Shot Lake district (near Grande Prairie AB.) His father, David Calliou, was of the Cree tribe, and his mother was Clarisse Campbell. Archie had a younger brother, Eddie. When Archie was 16 years old he misrepresented his age and enlisted in service in WW II. His quote from a news article was, “ I joined because I thought Canada needed help and I was scared we’d lose the country, so I thought I’d pitch in but I had to lie.” He was posted in Europe, and he received several medals. He was loaned to the to the British 6th Airborne (Artillery) Division. Archie was an advocate for Canadians and native people, and he described himself as “Canadian”. Founder of the Grande Prairie Friendship Centre in the 1960’s he believed it should be a place for all Canadians. During his life of 74 years, he held many jobs: trapper, farm hand, lecturer, entertainer, and alcoholism counsellor. In 1985 he released his first record, and he played in Nashville in the 1970s with his band, “The Northern Echoes.” He was involved in the Chambers of Commerce in Valleyview and Fort St. John, and in several political parties. In the 1980s he was Sergeant at Arms in the Fort St. John Royal Canadian Legion. Archie was married to Dorothy for 30 years, and they lived in Beaverlodge AB. He died in August 1998 from pancreatic cancer in Beaverlodge.

Source: Where the Red Willow Grew p. 303 (Name in Roll of Honour)
Pioneers of the Peace p. 8
SPRA Family and Personal Life Reference Files – News articles : HT June 30, 1995 and Aug. 19, 1998

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Lance Corporal David Burrows

Image: David Burrows, 1940 (SPRA 2005.094.06)

Regimental No.: M.104378
Rank: Lance Corporal

At the age of 3, David Burrows came to Canada with his parents, Robert and Mary (Pollock), and siblings from Scotland, in 1927. They settled in the Glen Leslie district by Bezanson AB and operated a farm. David attended the Somme School from 1931 to 1939. He remained on the home farm until he enlisted in WW II service on October 14, 1942 in Grande Prairie. ( 7 Burrows/ Pollock siblings served in WW II). First he was in Edmonton for basic training, and then on December 29th, 1942 he left for Chilliwack BC for advance training until September 1943. Next, he took army training in Hamilton ON, returned to Chilliwack, and then to Truro, NS. Once in England, he was involved in the invasion of Normandy at Juno Beach, and then went into Caen. Later, he went to France and Holland, again to England, before returning home in 1945.

While posted overseas, he met and married his wife, Iris, in England. When they returned to Canada, they resided in Grande Prairie where David’s jobs included driving a horse-drawn milk wagon, and working at Imperial Motors. In 1956 the family returned to England. David and Iris had 3 children: Pete, John, and Judy. David passed away on February 6, 2014 in Grande Prairie at age 89.

Source:
Smoky River to Grande Prairie p. 448
p. 422 Photo as a child with 3 siblings, George, Leslie and Helen
SPRA Family
Reference Files – (information by Helen Burrows Horrigan (sister)).
-Obituary
-Photo of David in uniform

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Private Raymond Boyer

Image: Ray Boyer, the soldier on the right, in Amsterdam in May, 1945. Behind is the first “Butter Boat” that arrived after the end of the war. (SPRA 445.01.22)

Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders – 1st Canadian Division
Regimental Number: K 737
Rank: Private

Ray Boyer was born December 11, 1924 in Grande Prairie, AB, and raised in East Kleskun on a farm on the south banks of Kleskun Lake (NE 35-72-4 W6). His father, Isaac, came to the Peace country from South Dakota and travelled over the Edson Trail in 1912. His mother, Bertha Delaney, a widow with six children, came to the Peace country from Ontario in 1919 and married Isaac Boyer. Along with his three- half sisters and three half-brothers, Ray also had an older brother, an older sister and a younger brother making up their family of ten children. Ray started his education in the East Kleskun School in 1930. The school was located 3.5 miles from their farm so it was a treat when he could ride a horse, especially in winter. Midway through grade school, Rays’s older brother, Clarence became the lead brother on the farm as their father was an invalid in his later years due to arthritis. Ray’s mother and the younger children were responsible for milking the cows, tending animals and other chores.

At the age of fifteen, Ray had to quit school and go to work to help support the family. One of his first jobs was to deliver water and ice to residences in Grande Prairie with a team of Pat Croken’s horses. He also remembers working in George Vagt’s Butcher Shop in Grande Prairie making wieners and sausage in a smoke house in the back alley. For the next three years Ray worked on different jobs including hauling gasoline up the Alaska Highway as far as Watson Lake. In 1943, Ray left for Vancouver and joined the Canadian Army. From Vancouver, he went to Wetaskiwin for Basic Training, then to Calgary for Advanced Training, and eventually to England where he took Signal Training. As a member of the Seaforth Highlanders First Division, Ray landed in Italy at Avaleno. From there Ray was sent to the front lines where troops relieved the Royal 22 Regiment of Quebec and Ray remembers seeing his first badly wounded soldier. They advanced north of Russi and in Bagnacavello, Italy, and in 1944 spent Christmas with a dinner in a church. At this time Ray was thrilled to meet up with his brothers Clarence and Archie close to the Senio River.

After Italy, the Highlanders were trucked to Holland. They crossed rivers in “Buffalos” which were floating tanks. Once after getting across, they were fired on and Ray remembers lying behind a dead cow for protection. They were continuing to advance through two towns in Holland when the news came that the Germans had surrendered. The Seaforths were then stationed in Amsterdam and Ray finally came home to Vancouver in May, 1946. Back in Grande Prairie, Ray worked different jobs: hauling lumber, working a dozer and a caterpillar and survey work. In 1953, Ray married Rita Robideau and they had three sons: Eldon, Doug and Arnie. Ray began working for the County of Grande Prairie in 1954 and remained there until 1985. He served on County Council, and numerous Boards including South Peace Health, Education, Planning, Evergreen Park, and the Agricultureal Society.

Ray wound down his career working as a Landman for Roy Northern working with landowners for approval of well sites, pipelines and right of ways. In 2000, Ray was the proud recipient of “Senior of the Year” from the Alberta Government. Ray has volunteered much of his retirement years developing the historic site at Kleskun Hill Museum. In 2001, Ray and his youngest son, Arnie, took a three week trip to Europe to revisit many of the sites he had been to during WWII.

Ray died in Grande Prairie on August 1, 2012.

Source: Rita Boyer
SPRA Family and Personal Life Reference Files (Obituary and news article)
Smoky River to Grande Prairie p. 119

Ray Boyer fonds

Ray Boyer photographs

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Sergeant Alexander Burrows

Image: Alexander Burrows, 1940 (SPRA 2005.094.04)

Regiment: 49th Loyal Edmonton Regiment
Regiment No.: M16403
Rank: S/Sgt

Alexander Burrows came to Canada from Scotland in 1927 with his father, Robert Burrows, and stepmother Mary (Pollock) Burrows , and siblings at age 9. They settled in the Glen Leslie district (near Bezanson AB) and he and his siblings attended the Somme School. Alec worked for several people in the community. Together with his brother Tom, he homesteaded in Fitzsimmons (in Bezanson area). On September 14, 1939 Alec enlisted in the 49th Edmonton Regiment to serve in WW II. ( 7 Burrows/Pollock siblings enlisted in the war.) He sailed for England on Oct. 15, 1939. In 1940 he headed to Norway, then England and Scotland. He was engaged in a raid on Spitzbergen, north of Norway. July 1941 they were successful in landing, and destroyed the coal mines and oil wells. He sailed to the Middle East in July 1943 to invade Sicily. In August 1943 he moved to Italy to fight in the battle of Ortona, and he was wounded and evacuated to the 13th General Hospital (Canadian) in North Africa. Returning to UK in 1944, he stayed at a camp at Aldershot before he was repatriated to Canada. While overseas in England he met and married his wife, Winnie. They had 4 children: Margaret, Janet, James, and Ian. The Burrows moved to Montreal and later to Ottawa. Alec died at age 80 on July 23, 1998 in Ottawa, and the remains of his cremation were buried in Grande Prairie AB.

I, Sargent Burrows (M16403) enlisted with the 49th Loyal Edmonton Regiment, Sept. 14, 1939. I sailed for England in an advance party of the 1st Division on Oct 15, 1939. In 1940 I went to Dunfermline to embark for Norway as the Germans had invaded from the south. I was back in England, prior to Dunkirk. I returned to Scotland to attend a commando course under the command of Lord Lovatt. I returned to England and prepared for the raid on Spitzbergen, located north of Norway, 500 miles inside the Arctic Circle. German Atlantic fleet had been using the island for a refueling base. 130 of our division were chosen to take part in the raid. In July, 1941, we were successful in landing and destroying the coal mines and oil wells. The Russian peasants were taken to Archangel, Russia and when we returned to Spitzbergen we loaded the Norwegians and brought them to Scotland. Not a living thing was left on the island. In July, 1943, we embarked and sailed to the Middle East to invade Sicily. In August, 1943,we moved into Italian mainland, fought our way up the mainland to Ortona in central Italy. I was wounded and evacuated to the 13th General Hospital (Canadian) in North Africa. In 1944, I returned to the UK and was posted to a camp at Aldershot where all Canadians were held prior to repatriation to Canada. I returned to Calgary and home.

Source: Smoky River to Grande Prairie p. 448 p. 422
Grande Prairie Daily Herald Tribune July 28, 1998 – Obituary
SPRA Family Reference Files – information written by Helen Burrows Horrigan (sister)
– Photo

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Lance Corporal Roy Oliver Boyd

Image: A platoon of army recruits in training on parade along Richmond Ave. In the background are Imperial Bank of Canada, J.B. Oliver furniture store, Hudson Bay Raw Furs, Porteous Hardware, James Drug store. 1943 (SPRA 2005.052.01)

Regiment: Loyal Edmonton Regiment
Rank: Lance Corporal

Roy Boyd was born and grew up in the Wembley AB area. In October 1940 he enlisted for service in WWII in Grande Prairie. At first he joined the Edmonton Fusiliers, and then transferred to the Loyal Edmonton Regiment. For one and a half years he was posted overseas in England, North Africa, Sicily, and Italy. Roy was injured on December 26, 1943 in the Battle of Ortona in Italy and was the lone survivor of an Edmonton Platoon that was blown up by German pioneers. Roy was rescued after being buried for three and a half days and spent five months in Italian and English hospitals. He spent another year in hospitals back in Canada in Calgary and Edmonton. On December 24, 1944 Roy married Beryl Perves who was also from Wembley. He was discharged from the armed forces in July 1945, and shortly afterwards bought his father’s home quarter of land. The couple lived there until 1956 when they moved into Wembley. In 1968 they relocated to Grande Prairie. The Boyds had 7 children: Cheryl, Donna, David, Valerie, Vivian, Marilyn and Susan. Roy was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion. He passed away on January 16, 1985 at age 64 in Grande Prairie, and he was buried in the Lake Saskatoon Cemetery in Wembley.

Source:
Along the Wapiti p. 412 – Name listed in WW II Veterans
p. 338
Grande Prairie AGS – Obituary Index, Cemetery Index

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.