Cowboy Rebellion

Donald’s Round-Up, which featured a horse show, races, chariot and chuckwagon races, horse pulling, and baseball looks to have been a huge success, but was “slightly marred” by what was thought to be the first sit down strike in Alberta.  The bronco and steer riders appear to have demanded day money in addition to the prizes as advertised, and staged the strike.  The solution was sharp and swift – the events were canceled.  Later, $1 was given to each of forty boys who would come out of the chutes riding the steers, likely the prize money.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ August 20, 1937

Grande Prairie Herald ~ August 20, 1937

Making the Grade

The condition of roads in town has been an ongoing problem, as this item from 1917 shows.  One of the town councilors decided to do something about the situation, and it appears he was very successful, improving the roads and saving the village hundreds of dollars in the process.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ July 17, 1917

Grande Prairie Herald ~ July 17, 1917

Not Your Usual Saturday Night Fights

Haina Kirstien, winner in the 185 lb. novice class of the Provincial Amateur Boxing Championships held in Grande Prairie March 18, 1950.

Haina Kirstien, winner in the 185 lb. novice class of the Provincial Amateur Boxing Championships held in Grande Prairie March 18, 1950.

There are many articles about boxing matches in the old papers, and I usually just skip them.  I started reading this one and right at the start was intrigued by the idea of a band playing between the bouts.  I also found the idea of a match between a wrestler and a boxer, each following the rules of his own sport, quite fascinating.  Overall, it seemed like a pretty good day of entertainment at the First of July sports.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Northern Tribune ~ July 7, 1932

Northern Tribune ~ July 7, 1932

100th Anniversary of the Rio Grande Rodeo

The Rio Grande Store and Post Office and its small cluster of buildings and houses made up the east half of the community of Rio Grande. Across the road was St. Patrick's Catholic Church and Rectory and the Rio Grande Hall, ca. 1930

The Rio Grande Store and Post Office and its small cluster of buildings and houses made up the east half of the community of Rio Grande. Across the road was St. Patrick’s Catholic Church and Rectory and the Rio Grande Hall, ca. 1930

I found this ad for tenders for booths at the Rio Grande Rodeo in the June 14, 1929 newspaper, and thought it was a bit of a different look at the planning that went into this event.  There is an excellent history of the Rio Grande Rodeo on their website.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 14, 1929

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 14, 1929

Summer Resort of the North

Our blog in July 2014 printed an article from 1925 that said “Sturgeon Lake, with a good road to it, could never be prevented from becoming the most popular place in the north country during the summer months.”  Well, eight years later in 1933 there must have been a road, as there were amenities galore.  You could rent a rowboat, motorboat, or cottage, eat in a restaurant, dance in the pavilion, shoot the Chutes, and get your hair done!

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 20, 1933

Chautauqua in Grande Prairie

La Glace Just-A-Mere-Ladies Club group photo featuring costumed musicians and actors, 1958

La Glace Just-A-Mere-Ladies Club group photo featuring costumed musicians and actors, 1958

This item is the first time I have noticed any mention of Chautauqua in the area.  This was obviously a traveling group, who were booked to spend four days in Spirit River, Sexsmith, Grande Prairie, Wembley, Hythe, and Pouce Coupe.  While the variety of entertainment from outside would have been very appealing to the locals, people here were no strangers to fine music and artistic performances, judging by the items consistently appearing in the papers about events in communities throughout the area.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 21, 1929

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 21, 1929

Rising to the Occasion

Grande Prairie fire, 1916

Grande Prairie fire, 1916

I guess this item got my attention because of the recent fires which caused such devastation in Fort McMurray.  While much smaller in scope, the clipping shows that people always rallied to help, not just local families, but also those farther away.  The members of St. Joseph’s Parish sent many boxes, and the Cooperative Employees’ Association held a dance to raise money for the Fire Relief Fund.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald-Tribune ~ June 18, 1949

The Herald-Tribune ~ June 18, 1949

Dangerous Puddle

The Imperial Bank of Canada on the north-west corner of Richmond Avenue was later occupied by Central Jewellers on the ground floor and Cal's Barber Shop, ca. 1935

The Imperial Bank of Canada on the north-west corner of Richmond Avenue was later occupied by Central Jewellers on the ground floor and Cal’s Barber Shop, ca. 1935

When I noticed the headline on this item, my first thought was that the little boy had fallen into the creek.  Much to my surprise, the body of water in question was “a pool of water at the corner of main street and the Boulevard” (102 St.).  Now that’s some pothole!  Fortunately the boy was rescued, apparently none the worse for his experience.  One shudders to think of the repercussions of such an incident today.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Northern Tribune ~ June 8, 1933

Northern Tribune ~ June 8, 1933

Big Sale on Now!

I’ve seen a lot of sales in my day, but never one for a medical procedure.  I think the idea was good – kind of an assembly line doing tonsillectomies.  It was very frustrating not to be able to find the rest of the article.  Also curious that the Northern Tribune newspaper did not have an article about this, or the ad.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grand Prairie Herald ~ June 6, 1933

Grand Prairie Herald ~ June 6, 1933

Grand Prairie Herald ~ June 6, 1933

Grand Prairie Herald ~ June 6, 1933

Re-Opening of the Royal Cafe

Grande Prairie Herald ~ May 28, 1937

Grande Prairie Herald ~ May 28, 1937

A popular cafe for many years, the Royal Cafe must have seen many renovations in its time.  For this refurbishment in 1937, the cafe was closed for three weeks.  The article lists many of the changes and improvements, including a novel ventilator for the stove, an insulated and refrigerated cold room, and lino floors.  The color scheme was deep cream and orange.  The cafe operated well into the 1960s, and while I don’t remember much about the interior of the cafe, I do remember that they had the best pineapple chicken balls in town!

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ May 28, 1937

Grande Prairie Herald ~ May 28, 1937