Recipes Revisited

maple

Two weeks ago we posted some recipes for Lent.  I have tried a couple of them since then and my conclusion is that there must be better things to cook for Lent… or any other time!  The Cream of Spaghetti Soup had very little taste.  I salvaged it by straining it and adding more tomatoes to make a fairly good cream of tomato soup.  The Nut Dressing was quite good but a bit too sweet, and didn’t need the nuts at all.  It tasted like Heinz Salad Cream English Dressing at about $3.50 for 265 ml, so making it if you had some leftover condensed milk might be worth it.  Half the recipe made plenty.  I was going to try the Fish Fillets Waikiki, but decided that modern ways of cooking fish are much better than simmering the heck out of it and throwing on a sweet sauce.

I have been working away at the maple syrup recipes below.  The Maple Biscuits were very sweet but not as good as the old time Hasty Pudding which was batter put into a mixture of brown sugar and water.  Same with the Maple Apples – good enough, but very sweet, could get better results with brown sugar.  I didn’t try the Maple Sauce, it just seemed pointless.  However, the Maple Cake and Maple Icing were very good.  It was easy to make and had a lovely subtle maple flavor.  I only made half the recipe and baked it in an 8″ pan.  No more recipes for a while now – it will take me a while to get all the things I made used up!

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald Tribune ~ April 25, 1940

The Herald Tribune ~ April 25, 1940

It’s Not Just an Extra Day

leap year

There are many traditions about Leap Year which say that women may propose to men on February 29.  Many countries had specific penalties if the proposal was refused, so it was a win-win situation for the woman – she either got a husband or leather gloves, roses, enough fabric to make a skirt or a silk gown, for example.  In some parts of Europe the fine was twelve pairs of gloves, assuming the woman would need a lot of gloves to wear to hide the embarrassment of not having an engagement ring.  The Sadie Hawkins Day tradition originated in the Li’l Abner comic strip and inspired “real world” Sadie Hawkins dances, where the girls asked the boys out.  Sometimes the Sadie Hawkins idea gets intertwined with Leap Year, as in this ad for a dance in Beaverlodge in a leap year.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 24, 1931

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 24, 1931

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 19, 1948

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 19, 1948

North to Alaska – More Sightings

After our Thursday File post last week about a car with Hawaii license plates spotted in Grande Prairie, I found these articles about American vehicles passing through on their way to Alaska.  A short item explains the increase in travel on the Alaska Highway, which had previously been reserved for military use.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 20, 1947

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 20, 1947

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 20, 1947

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 20, 1947

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 19, 1948

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 19, 1948

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 19, 1948

The Herald-Tribune ~ February 19, 1948

Who’s to Say There’s Nothing to Do in a Small Town

Olaf Hommy and his car, ca. 1945

Olaf Hommy and his car, ca. 1945

The July 15, 1948 paper reported the sighting of a car with Hawaii license plates in town.  It created enough attention for the newspaper to send someone to talk to the car’s owners.  I remember when you could tell if an Alberta car was from out of town, just by the license plate numbers.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald Tribune ~ July 15, 1948

The Herald Tribune ~ July 15, 1948

The Ultimate Group Cruise – Seven Shiploads of Canadian Soldiers Head to England

In 1940, Willie Remple, who had enlisted with the Edmonton Regiment, wrote home telling about the trip across the Atlantic.  He was very impressed with the ship (while it was still in the Halifax harbour!) but by mid-Atlantic he says he won’t cross that ocean again – “I don’t think I’ll come home til they build a bridge across it.”  He married in England in 1943, but I couldn’t find any more about him.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald Tribune ~ February 8, 1940

The Herald Tribune ~ February 8, 1940

Angry Editor

Richmond Avenue, ca. 1945

Richmond Avenue, ca. 1945

This article appeared on the front page of the January 31, 1946 Herald Tribune.  An obviously upset editor (I assume) raised the issue of support for local business by the Town.  It probably wasn’t a new concern then, and it still comes up in one form or another.  Unfortunately, there is no paper for the next week online, so I was unable to find any response from the town.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald Tribune ~ January 31, 1946

The Herald Tribune ~ January 31, 1946

Doing It the Hard Way

The swimming pool built by the Kinsmen Club in 1948 (photo taken in 1950)

The swimming pool built by the Kinsmen Club in 1948 (photo taken in 1950)

This item from June 1947 caught my attention because I had just read about the repairs that were going to be made to the Bear Creek Swimming Pool.  That pool replaced the one referred to in this article.  When money was running short, members of the Kinsmen Club jumped in with shovels to ensure that the pool would be in operation that summer.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald Tribune ~ June 5, 1947

The Herald Tribune ~ June 5, 1947

Obstacles to the Hockey Season

There had been predictions that there would be no hockey in the area because many of the players were in the army, but it turned out that the younger players gave a good account of themselves in the first game.  A late start to getting ice made resulted in the teams having little practice.  An officer from the Military Training Centre was present and stated that they would soon have an outside rink ready, and the Centre would have at least one team from among the recruits.  The second article announcing the next game mentions that some of the Sexsmith players had been skating on local ponds to get in shape.  A far cry from the way things are now!

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald-Tribune ~ November 28, 1940

Grande Prairie Herald-Tribune ~ November 28, 1940

Grande Prairie Herald-Tribune ~ November 28, 1940

Grande Prairie Herald-Tribune ~ November 28, 1940

Trick or Treat & Pennies for CARE

This article from 1947 surprised me because the Kinsmen were enlisting the aid of trick or treaters in collecting pennies for CARE parcels for Britain.  CARE had been founded after World War II to send packages to Europe, and though I knew that rationing in Britain had lasted quite a while after the War, I didn’t realize that in many ways, rationing was worse there after the war than during.  Rationing didn’t totally end in Britain until 1954, and had been an issue in national elections, contributing to the defeat of the Labour Government in 1951.  This project of the Kinsmen club was a continuation of their efforts during the war in aid of the Milk for Britain Fund, which also used Halloween to raise extra funds.

On the lighter side, some thoughts by the Editor about Halloween from 1932.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald-Tribune ~ October 30, 1947

The Herald-Tribune ~ October 30, 1947

Grande Prairie Herald ~ November 1, 1932

Grande Prairie Herald ~ November 1, 1932