Soldier Spotlight: The Bostock Brothers

Image: An item from Neville’s military service file (Library & Archives Canada)

Edward Lyon Bostock

Regimental Number: Second Lieutenant
Rank: 13778
Branch: The Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment); Princess Charlotte’s of Wales (Royal Berkshire Regiment), 4th Battalion; Royal Sussex Regiment

Edward was born in Horsham, Sussex, England on November 9, 1886. He and his brother Neville came to the South Peace in 1913; Edward filed on SW 22-80-14-W6. When the First World War broke out, Edward returned to England to serve in the British Army. He was wounded twice, the first time just ten days after landing in France in March/April of 1915. Two years later, in April of 1917, Edward was leading his men in an attack on three villages at the Somme. He was wounded in action and taken to the hospital at Bray. Edward died on April 5, 1917. Five of his brothers also served in the war, and two more were killed, including Neville.

Neville Stanley Bostock
Regimental Number: 117155; 6254

Rank: Private; Second Lieutenant
Branch: 12th Regiment, Canadian Mounted Rifles; Royal Field Artillery

Neville was born in Horsham, Sussex, England on April 6, 1888. In 1913, he and his brother Edward came to the South Peace; Neville filed on SE 21-80-14-W6. He joined the RNWMP on September 15, 1914 and served for one year. In September of 1915, he enlisted in the Canadian Army. Neville was discharged in January of 1916 on appointment to Commission in Royal Field Artillery. On April 22, 1917 near Arras, Neville was killed instantly by the explosion of an enemy shell. His major wrote to his mother saying, “He is a great loss as an officer and is dreadfully missed. His knowledge of horseflesh and horsemanship made him invaluable.” The Captain of his Battery wrote to his parents, “Your son was always cheery and capable and I miss him more than I can say.” Five of his brothers served in the war, two more of whom were killed, including Edward.

The Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Margaret Stanton Weaver

Margaret Stanton was born in St. Alban’s, England and joined the Field Army Nursing Yeomanry in 1938. She drove an ambulance and ration truck during the War and later was employed taking away gun emplacements and transporting prisoners of war. She met Art at a USO show put on by the American army and they were married in Aldershot on January 23, 1946. Their son, Ken, was born that same year and after Art left for Canada, she and Ken boarded the Queen Mary with thousands of other brides and children for their trip to Canada. They lived near Cadogan, Alberta and later moved to Grande Prairie. She never went back to England.

Margaret Weaver, SPRA 259.03.01

The Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

 

Soldier Spotlight: Sapper Robert Kater

Regimental Number: 505882
Rank: Sapper
Branch: 1st Tunnelling Company, Canadian Engineers

Robert was born in May of 1884 in France. He was working as a stonemason in Grande Prairie at the time of his enlistment in August of 1916. Robert was buried under 16 feet of earth when a tunnel he was working in was bombarded by German shells. During his recovery in Brocklan, Robert met Anna Edith Card, whom he married in London in 1918. In January of 1919, they returned to Grande Prairie. A lung condition caused by gassing during the war necessitated a move to a warmer climate, and the Kater family moved to Victoria. Robert died in Victoria on March 14, 1943.

Sources: Along the Wapiti p. 158

The Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Josephine Mary Ann “Bubs” Fulks

Date of Birth: 25 Oct 1919
Date of Death: 18 April 2015
“Bubs was born on Oct. 25, 1919 in Fort. Saskatchewan to Walter and Josephine Wood. She was the fourth child of five. She was quickly nicknamed Bubbles and became known as Bubs for most of her life. Growing up in Radway, Alberta by the railway tracks, the train would always remind her of the comfort of home. Bubs joined the WRCNS in 1943 at Edmonton, and was sent overseas to Britain. These were days of immense pride for Bubs. She always spoke of the comradery, companionship and honour that serving her country had given her, and was faithful in her Remembrance Day attendance.”

The Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Featured image is a still from the video of her funeral, from the Bear Creek Funeral Home YouTube channel

Soldier Spotlight: Staff Sergeant Major Charles Turner

Photograph: Charles T. M. Turner and his army friend outside a tent during World War I, ca. 1915 (SPRA 2011.44.05)

Regimental Number: 30650
Rank: Staff Sergeant Major
Branch: Canadian Army Service Corps

Charles was born in Chilliwack, British Columbia on December 7, 1891. He traveled to Valcartier to enlist in the Canadian Army in September of 1914. While serving in France, Charles was billeted at the Dubois home. He married daughter Jeanne in 1916. They made their home in England for a time, and their first son, Charles, was born on March 13, 1917. From February 1918 onward, Charles served only in England. In January of 1919, he spent some time at an RFC base. After the war, the Turners moved to Calgary, then to Bezanson, where Charles filed on the western half of 33-71-26-W5 in 1919, and finally into Grande Prairie around 1921. Charles died in early 1976 and was buried in the Grande Prairie Cemetery.

Sources: surname file; news clippings

The Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Violet Remnant Dryer

Violet Remnant was a 16 year old shop assistant in Wrecclesham, Surrey, not far from the Canadian Army Base in Aldershot, when she first met Arnold Dryer at a dance in the Village Hall. Arnold’s squadron was billeted nearby in the village of Rowledge. The relationship blossomed, and from wherever Arnold’s squadron moved to, his letters found their way back to Violet. At 18, Vi joined the Air Force, working as a clerk in RAF records in Gloucestershire. When the war ended, they were afraid that Arnold would be drafted home, so with four days’ notice, they planned a wedding. “We still needed clothing coupons to buy new clothing,” Vi remembered. “I bought a royal blue dress, and my mother used seven of her own coupons to buy Arnold some Oxford shoes. There was no way she was going to let him go up the aisle in army boots!”. They were married on April 23, 1945 in Rowledge, England. After the wedding, Arnold was indeed sent back to Canada, and Vi waited for permission from the Canadian Wives Bureau to join him. She was discharged from the Air Force and put in time helping at the local post office. In June she sailed on the Aquatania with another bride bound for Grande Prairie, Betty Eskdale. The war brides were processed through immigration at Pier 21 in Halifax. Vi arrived on July 4, 1946 (along with her sister-in-law, Pat Dryer who was married to Arnold’s brother, Robert). The editor of the newspaper, J.B. Yule, was one person Vi met on her first day in Grande Prairie. The news of their arrival was proclaimed on the front page in the next issue of the paper: “Three War Brides Arrive Grande Prairie”. Although the young Mrs. Dryer was “homesick off and on” over the next year, she enjoyed being on the farm and the many good neighbours. Violet and Arnold had three children: Dale, Mark, and Ann. Grande Prairie is still Vi’s home 60+ years later.  

Violet in her uniform, SPRA 259.02.05 | Violet and her husband, Arnold Dryer, on their wedding day, SPRA 0259.02.01 | Violet Remnant Dryer, SPRA 0553.06 

The Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Featured Photo: Violet’s Travel Certificate, SPRA

Soldier Spotlight: Sergeant Harry Croft

Image: Notes from Harry’s military service file (Library & Archives Canada)

Regimental Number: 79815
Rank: Sergeant
Branch: 31st Battalion

Harry was born in Walsall, England on July 19, 1885. It is unknown when he first came to Canada, but he enlisted in the Canadian Army in Edmonton on November 25, 1914. Harry suffered from gunshot wounds to his “upper extremities” in September of 1916. He was awarded the Military Medal:

“For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Courcelette on 15th, Sept 1916. He was wounded at the commencement of the attack but refused to leave the field. His actions though out the day were most conspicuous, and his fine example and courage had a great effect upon the men under his immediate command.”

On June 29, 1918 he was discharged due to “defective feet,” or flat feet, which had begun to trouble him on the march to the Somme in September of 1917. Harry also had varicose veins, which caused swelling in his legs. When he returned to Canada in 1918, Harry filed on NW 15-79-5-W6 and SE 15-79-5-W6. He died at the Veterans Pavilion in Edmonton on December 12, 1952.

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Patricia Burroughs

Regiment: Royal Canadian Air Force – Women’s Division

Patricia was the daughter of Lee and Margaret Burroughs, and she was born on May 2, 1925 in Meadow Lake SK. In 1937 she moved with her family to Codesa in the Peace Country, and went to school there. At age 18, in May 1943, Pat enlisted in the RCAF Women’s Division in Edmonton AB. She was posted in Ottawa and Toronto ON, Winnipeg MB, and Calgary AB. She married Duane Hillier in 1949, but after a few years was divorced. In the late 50’s Pat moved to Chico, California.

Source: Smoky Peace Triangle pp. 156-157

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

 

Soldier Spotlight: Private Roy Cameron

Image: Notes about Roy’s ankle injury from his military service file (Library & Archives Canada)

Regimental Number: 904582
Rank: Private
Branch: 194th Battalion; 10th Battalion

Roy was born in Wheeler, Ontario on November 3, 1885. In 1913, he filed on LT 29 in Spirit River. He enlisted in the Canadian Army in March of 1916. On June 30, 1917, while taking refuge from shellfire at Vimy Ridge, Roy fractured his os calcis (heel/ankle) when he dropped down a shaft. A shell casing struck his foot, causing the fracture. Roy’s military service file include many detailed reports about the injury. He had a mild degree of claw foot on his left foot. Another report also indicates that Roy had nervous systems. On page 31 of Roy’s service file is a telegraph sent to his father, informing him of Roy’s hospitalization. Roy was invalided to Canada in late 1917 and discharged on September 3, 1918. Roy eventually left the South Peace. He died on August 20, 1967 and was buried in Santa Barbara, California.

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

From the Vault Friday: Valentines Card

Today’s “From the Vault Friday” features a Valentine’s Day card from the Eddie & Margaret Schadeck fonds (Fonds 131)

Margaret Alma Stevens (Regtl. No. W3225) was born July 8, 1907, in Easton’s Corners, Ontario. She attended school there until Grade 9, later taking a course in Business College in Ottawa. Her parents, Mr. & Mrs. William Stevens, lived at Kemptville, ON when she enlisted in WW II at Kingston, ON. Margaret joined the Canadian Women Army Corps (CWAC), No. 7 Company, and trained at Barriefield, ON in 1943, where she met Eddie Schadeck. She served as a clerk at Fort Frontenac, Kingston until her discharge in 1946. Her interests included riding horses and writing poetry and songs. Margaret started army correspondence courses while at Barriefield and continued them in Brockville, ON after she was discharged, and in Wembley after her marriage. After the war, Eddie and Margaret married in 1946 and farmed on land obtained through the Veteran’s Land Act. Their farm was located south of Huallen in the Wembley area. In the 1950s, they moved to Salmon Arm, where they lived until Margaret passed away in 1999.

The card, dated 27-1-45, reads:

Hi Eddie

                From the midst of snow drifts, very cold air + ice I salute you. Hope you are well. I am enjoying the very best of health, thank you. Went to see a very good show the other night, it was a comedy called Janie. I am glad the little sister isn’t mine what trouble!!! Then there is the picture everyone is talking about, Mrs. Parkington. Its good. Greer Garson is wonderful, but then she usually is. Hope you will find time to write soon. I like to hear from you. Will try to find something interesting to write about. We are having a sleigh riding party in a couple of weeks wish you were here for it.

Bye now! Love Mary

Read more about the Eddie & Margaret Schadeck fonds (Fonds 131) here.

From the Vault Friday is a social media campaign that highlights interesting materials from the collections of the South Peace Regional Archives. This project was made possible by an Access to Holdings Grant from the Archives Society of Alberta.