Fonds 007 Spirit of the Peace fonds

Spirit of the Peace fonds. — 1988 – 2002. — 33 cm of textual records. — 500 photographs. — 8 sound recordings. — 1 video recordings.


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Agency History

Spirit of the Peace is an informal liaison between the museums in the Peace Country. It was established after the Alberta Museums Association convention held in Grande Prairie in 1989, at which many of the smaller museums in the Peace had assisted with special projects and displays. It was felt that a continued relationship between the museums would benefit all, so in December 1989 Fran Moore (DeBolt), Alice Fortier (Grande Prairie) and Kirsten Classen (Peace River) met with other museums to plan and organize joint projects. They agreed to meet quarterly, at a different museum each time, and to send out a newsletter after each meeting to any museum in the Peace Country wishing to be a member of the group. A logo was developed and used for a pin as well as a perpetual calendar to advertise the museums.

It soon became apparent that the best way to bring the museums together was to travel to all the museums and historic sites and get to know the people. From 1990 to 1993, the association organized tours and information trips all over the Peace Country, most often historical information sessions for large groups, but also as a public relations exercise by Fran Moore and Alice Fortier.

Projects which the group accomplished together included Peace Country tours, a joint brochure, seven highway signs at entry points to the Peace Country, and a passport program. In 1994, funded by Museums Alberta through one of their member museums, they began to work together for larger goals: Advancing Museum Standards, a regional research project called A Sense of the Peace, a promotional video called Discover the Spirit of the Peace, and a 100th Anniversary display for Treaty 8.

Museums all across the Alberta and British Columbia Peace Country are encouraged to joint the network for a nominal annual fee to cover the cost of printing the newsletter and other incidentals. Meetings are held quarterly at different museums, followed by lunch and a tour of the host museum. It is a time to meet other volunteers and museum personnel, find out what each museum is doing and work on common problems.

Scope and Content

The fonds consists of copies of Spirit of the Peace newsletters; written descriptions, photographs and pamphlets collected on three tours of the Peace Country sponsored by Spirit of the Peace in 1990-1991; oral history tapes made for the Treaty 8 display and kit in 1999; and publications promoting the museums and activities of the group.

Notes

This fonds has been identified as having Indigenous related content. Researchers may encounter language that is outdated and offensive. To learn more about Indigenous records at the South Peace Regional Archives please see our guide.

Table of Contents

Series 007.01 Organizational history series
Series 007.02 Financial records series
Series 007.03 Promotions series
Series 007.04 Projects series
Series 007.05 Correspondence series
Series 007.06 Newsletter series
Series 007.01 Organizational history series. — 1988 – 2002. — 3 cm of textual records.

Spirit of the Peace is an informal liaison between the museums in the Peace Country. It was established after the Alberta Museums Association convention held in Grande Prairie in 1989, at which many of the smaller museums in the Peace had assisted with special projects and displays. It was felt that a continued relationship between the museums would benefit all, so in December 1989 Fran Moore (DeBolt), Alice Fortier (Grande Prairie) and Kirsten Classen (Peace River) met with other museums to plan and organize joint projects. They agreed to meet quarterly, at a different museum each time, and to send out a newsletter after each meeting to any museum in the Peace Country wishing to be a member of the group. A logo was developed and used for a pin as well as a perpetual calendar to advertise the museums. It soon became apparent that the best way to bring the museums together was to travel to all the museums and historic sites and get to know the people. From 1990 to 1993, the association organized tours and information trips all over the Peace Country, most often historical information sessions for large groups, but also as a public relations exercise by Fran Moore and Alice Fortier. Projects which the group accomplished together included Peace Country tours, a joint brochure, seven highway signs at entry points to the Peace Country, and a passport program. In 1994, funded by Museums Alberta through one of their member museums, they began to work together for larger goals: Advancing Museum Standards, a regional research project called A Sense of the Peace, a promotional video called Discover the Spirit of the Peace, and a 100th Anniversary display for Treaty 8. Museums all across the Alberta and British Columbia Peace Country are encouraged to joint the network for a nominal annual fee to cover the cost of printing the newsletter and other incidentals. Meetings are held quarterly at different museums, followed by lunch and a tour of the host museum. It is a time to meet other volunteers and museum personnel, find out what each museum is doing and work on common problems.

The series consists of correspondence with the museums regarding the 1989 conference and the organization of the Spirit of the Peace, the perpetual calendar and log designed for the 1989 conference, membership lists, articles and speeches prepared for Museums Alberta newsletters, magazines and conferences.

Spirit of the Peace: An Invitation to Our Museums, [1991?]
Textual Document
Creator: Textual Document
Document describes how the Spirit of the Peace Museums Network began, what they have been doing (projects like bus tours, displays, and brochures), and describes their logo which can symbolize many things.
Location: 0007.01.01
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Series 007.02 Financial records series. — 1992-2002. — 1 cm of textual records.

The series consists of two notebooks detailing revenue (memberships, subscriptions, project fees, donations and miscellaneous) and expenses (newsletters, projects, miscellaneous) from 1992-2002. Prior to 1992, expenses were covered by various members in turn.

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Series 007.03 Promotions series. — 1989 – 2002. — 3 cm of textual records.

The series consists of materials produced to promote the Spirit of the Peace: logo, brochures, highway signs, legislature display, passport program, advertising in tourism and historical magazines, and articles written for the Peace Country Farmer in 1996-1997.

[Focus 1899 Brochure], 1999
Brochure
Creator: Brochure
Item is a brochure advertising the Sprit of the Peace’s travelling exhibit called Focus 1899. The exhibit focuses on telling the story of Treaty #8.
Location: 0007.03.01
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Series 007.04 Projects series. — 1990-1999. — 10 cm of textual records. — 500 photographs. — 8 sound recordings. — 1 video recordings.

The series consists of correspondence and grant applications and reports on Spirit of the Peace Projects: brochures, tours, highway signage, training, publications, displays and promotions. There are also photographs and literature from the various museums and events on tours, a Peace Country bibliography, the manuscript of A Sense of the Peace, the master video of Discover the Spirit of the Peace, 10 negatives of the text of Treaty 8; 8 audiotapes containing oral histories of first nations people regarding Treaty 8.

St. Bernard Mission Pamphlet, [1990]
Pamphlet
Pamphlet is contains information about Bishop Grouard, Kisemanito Centre, the Missionaries of Mary Gallery, the volunteer organization called Via Veritas Vita, and how/when visitors can visit.
Location: 0007.003
Treaty #8, 1899
Treaty
This document is a copy of Treaty 8 in the form of 10 individual photographic negatives. The original treaty is held by Library and Archives Canada.
Location: 0007.04.09
Treaty 8 Centennial, 1999
Pamphlet
Item is a Treaty 8 Centennial brochure which contains information regarding about treaty 8 and it’s promises, proposed activities and events to commemorate 100 years, and lists the members of the centennial committee.
Location: 0007.04.11
Centennial 1899, 1999
Schedule
Item is a schedule for the Centennial 1899 conference which was held at the Alberta Vocational College in Grouard Alberta. The conference was meant to further the understanding of Treaty number 8 and the distribution of script in 1899. The program highlights detailed sessions about the treaty process, treaty rights, treaty in practice etc.
Location: 0007.04.12
[Newsletters], 1998-1999
Textual Document
Creator: Textual Document
Three highlighted pages of Spirit of the Peace newsletters from Dec ’97-June ’98. The highlighted sections are all about different aspects of their Treaty 8 project including grant applications, and display recommendations.
Location: 0007.04.13
Regional Project #4-“Treaty 8 Display” Initial Planning, 1998
Textual Document
Creator: Textual Document
Document contains initial planning notes on the Spirit of the Peace’s travelling exhibit about Treaty 8. It includes the names of who was on the committee, their courses of action, what early feedback they had received, and descriptions on what this project could look like/be.
Location: 0007.04.14
[Treaty 8 Project Grant], 1998
Grant Application
Creator: Grant Application
This document is a Regional Museum Grant application for the “Treaty 8 Display and Promotion Project” from Grande Prairie Museum on behalf of the Spirit of the Peace. This grant application includes an overview of the project as well as anticipated budget. There is lots of hand written notes on the document.
Location: 0007.04.15
[Treaty 8 Grant Award Letter], July 30, 1998
Letter
Creator: Letter
This document is a letter from Adriana Davies at Museums Alberta to Peter Goertzen from Grande Prairie Museum announcing that his grant application for the “Treaty 8 Display & Promotion Project” was successful. It goes on to list what the jury felt were strengths of the project, their concerns, and their recommendations.
Location: 0007.04.16
[Treaty 8 Grant Letter], August 17, 1998
Letter
Creator: Letter
This document is a letter from Fran Moore and Peter Goertzen to Adriana Davies thanking the Alberta Museums Association for approving their grant application. This letter goes on to state how their committee is working to address the concerns the jury had when reviewing their application. As part of addressing these concerns, they have established a research team consisting of Dr. Davis Leonard, Dr. Don Wetherell, and Brian Calliou.
Location: 0007.04.17
[Letter From Auila Productions], Nov. 29, 1996
Letter
Creator: Letter
This letter is written by Mike Dodson, producer for Aquila Productions, to Peter Goertzen. It is about planning the Spirit of the Peace’s promotional film that was eventually called “Discover the Spirit of the Peace.” Dodson intends to create four characters who will be the voices across four different historical eras. The characters he intends to create are: an Indigenous elder, a missionary, a blacksmith, and a war-era homesteader. He intends to have the Indigenous elder be the link between all of the historical periods and act as the narrator.
Location: 0007.04.18
[St. Bernard Mission Church], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 6 x 4 in.
Photograph is from inside the St. Bernard Mission in Grouard showing a tabernacle with a teepee covering. Behind the tabernacle is a painting of Jesus on the cross. Above this painting is Cree Syllabics that translate to “God So Loved the World, He Gave His Only Son.”
Location: 0007.001
Peace Country Museum Tours, 1990-1991
500 photograph; colour; 4 x 6
Photographs taken during a tour of the museums of the Peace Country in 1990-1991.
Location: 0007.001-500
[Girouxville Museum], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 6 x 4 in.
Image shows the outside of the Girouxville Museum which features a totem pole.
Location: 0007.002
[Painting of Indigenous Woman], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Image is taken from inside St. Bernard Mission church and shows a painting of an Indigenous woman in traditional dress holding a cross. A votive candle sits in front of the painting.
Location: 0007.004
[St. Bernard Mission], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Image shows the front of the St. Bernard Mission Church in Grouard.
Location: 0007.005
[Bell Tower of St. Bernard Mission], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Image shows a close up of the bell tower on the St. Bernard Mission church in Grouard.
Location: 0007.006
[Inside St. Bernard Mission], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 6 x 4 in.
Image shows people standing and sitting inside the St. Bernard Mission Church.
Location: 0007.007
[Confessional Doors in St. Bernard Mission], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Image shows a close up of two internal confessional doors in St. Bernard Mission Church. The wood doors are carved and have the letters IHS coloured in red.
Location: 0007.008
[Side Alter in St. Bernard Mission], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Image shows a side altar in St. Bernard Mission Church.
Location: 0007.009
[Framed Aerial of St. Bernard Mission], 1990
; ;
Image shows a framed aerial photograph of the St. Bernard Mission from the 1950s.
Location: 0007.010
[Grouard Museum Exhibit], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Image shows an exhibit from the Grouard Museum (located at St. Bernard Mission). Image shows Indigenous artifacts and clothing. The photo was accompanied with this text “Pauleen, who checked up in to our rooms, took us on a tour of the museum in the college at 8:30. The beautiful Indian Clothing exhibits were much appreciated by all ~ but not more than Pauleen’s stories of the community + her growing up in the area.”
Location: 0007.011
[Grouard Museum Exhibit], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 6 x 4 in.
Image shows an exhibit from the Grouard Museum (located at St. Bernard Mission). Image shows Indigenous artifacts. The photo was accompanied with this text “Pauleen, who checked up in to our rooms, took us on a tour of the museum in the college at 8:30. The beautiful Indian Clothing exhibits were much appreciated by all ~ but not more than Pauleen’s stories of the community + her growing up in the area.”
Location: 0007.012
[Grouard Museum Exhibit], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 6 x 4 in.
Image shows an exhibit from the Grouard Museum (located at St. Bernard Mission). Image shows Indigenous artifacts. The photo was accompanied with this text “Pauleen, who checked up in to our rooms, took us on a tour of the museum in the college at 8:30. The beautiful Indian Clothing exhibits were much appreciated by all ~ but not more than Pauleen’s stories of the community + her growing up in the area.”
Location: 0007.013
[Grouard Museum Exhibit], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 6 x 4 in.
Image shows an exhibit from the Grouard Museum (located at St. Bernard Mission). Image shows Indigenous clothing and regalia. The photo was accompanied with this text “Pauleen, who checked up in to our rooms, took us on a tour of the museum in the college at 8:30. The beautiful Indian Clothing exhibits were much appreciated by all ~ but not more than Pauleen’s stories of the community + her growing up in the area.”
Location: 0007.014
[Grouard Museum Exhibit], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Image shows an exhibit from the Grouard Museum (located at St. Bernard Mission). Image shows Indigenous artifacts and clothing. The photo was accompanied with this text “Pauleen, who checked up in to our rooms, took us on a tour of the museum in the college at 8:30. The beautiful Indian Clothing exhibits were much appreciated by all ~ but not more than Pauleen’s stories of the community + her growing up in the area.”
Location: 0007.015
[Grouard Museum Exhibit], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Image shows an exhibit from the Grouard Museum (located at St. Bernard Mission). Image shows Indigenous artifacts, regalia, and clothing. The photo was accompanied with this text “Pauleen, who checked up in to our rooms, took us on a tour of the museum in the college at 8:30. The beautiful Indian Clothing exhibits were much appreciated by all ~ but not more than Pauleen’s stories of the community + her growing up in the area.”
Location: 0007.016
[St. Bernard Mission Tabernacle], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Photograph is from inside the St. Bernard Mission in Grouard showing a tabernacle with a teepee covering.
Location: 0007.017
[St. Bernard Mission], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
Image shows people seated in the pews of St. Bernard Mission in Grouard facing the front.
Location: 0007.018
[Grouard Museum], 1990
1 photograph; colour; 6 x 4 in.
Image shows three people in the Grouard Museum (located at St. Bernard Mission). The exhibit has Indigenous dolls, clothing, art, and other artifacts.
Location: 0007.019
Fredrick Cummings, April 1999
sound recording
Karen Riley interviewed Frederick David Cummings, April, 1999 in Fairview. Frederick is the great grandchild of one of the Beaver Dunvegan Band who signed the Treaty in 1899. His mother was Jean Mary Lowe and his grandmother, Louise Lowe. He had 5 sisters and 1 brother. He lived in Fairview most of his life -worked for the Hudson’s Bay Co. for 25 years – then came back. His fond memory was in grade nine being voted best all-round student. He played a lot of sports, did a lot of chores. He liked the singing in church . They lived on a homestead at Cummings Lake at first, then moved into town where his father did odd jobs. His grandmother Lowe lived in Peace River and he spent holidays, birthdays there. She was very generous, bought school clothes for them. His grandfather died with the flu. English was Frederick’s first language. David has 4 children -6 grandchildren and would like them to understand their gifts – the generosity afforded them by ancestors who were happy with little. His school teachers were his heroes- encouraged him to continue his education – go to university. Treaty Days (at Hay Lakes – now Gage) didn’t seem very important. It seemed after the Treaty was signed, people got discouraged, frustrated because of no help to develop the reserve. There was hereditary leadership of the reserve until 1991 when they got treaty rights back. Now there is leadership emerging to regain rights lost – they have 5 year goals.
Location: 0007.04.1
Caron Riley, 1999
sound recording
In 1999, in Manning, Caron Riley tells the story of her maternal great grandfather, Alex MacKenzie (the nephew of Sir Alexander Mac Kenzie.) and Eliza Le Pretre (s?). Alex had taken script, then worked for the Hudson’s Bay, eventually getting posted to Fort Chipewyan, Dunvegan, and Fort Vermilion. In 1888, he retied and in 1919, he died. Caron’s mother went to the St Augustine Mission and when she married became the hunter and provider. Her dad farmed, and gardened and they travelled by horse and wagon. The second part of the tape includes Caron’s own childhood memories growing up in the Webberville district.
Location: 0007.04.2
Marcia Houle, 1999
sound recording
Marcia’s daughter and others ask questions in English and Marcia replies in an Indigenous language. She knows both Cree and Chip. They discuss the 100th anniversary celebration of the signing of the Treaty in 1899.
Location: 0007.04.3
Elizabeth Calliou, Dan Cardinal, Bill Willier, 1999
sound recording
Interview conducted with Elizabeth Calliou, February, 1999, Sucker Creek. Elizabeth was born Sept. 17, 1912 on the reserve. She had a sister Angeline and one brother. Her mother was Flora and her father’s name may have been La Grande. She was orphaned at 6 years old and brought to the mission at Joussard where she remembers looking after her sister, going to school, playing, praying, knitting, fancy work and gardening. She completed grade six. She left the mission at age 18, married Clem, worked on farms and lived in the bush (in a tent), logging in the winter. They had one son. She used to go to church but now she prays at home every day. During Treaty Days, people would come from all over, and after they got their treaty money, they would set up tents where we could sell some of their stuff. Then there would be a dance. “I used to like it because I had $5.00. Nowadays they just collect their money and go.” The Band today works for themselves she says, only the nurse comes. The oldtimers worked better, visited people and brought them wood; the life was better before. Interview with Dan Cardinal, Feb 23, 1999, Brian Calliou as interviewer. Dan was born in Sucker Creek in 1931 to Sophie (Willier) and Francois Cardinal. Mrs. Badger was midwife at the time. Dan’s mother was widowed when he was about 4 years old. He had four brothers, all died of TB and of his four -six sisters, four died. He went to school at Joussard in the convent for 10 months of the year. He was happy to be there. He gives credit to the government – says it was a good in the long run. Home was a hard life for his Mom. He went to grade 6 or 7 in school and left at 17 to start work in bush camps. It was hard work, aching body, but grew to love it. He remembers trying to be a man and chew snuff and getting sick. On pay day he would give his mother some money. In the spring he got $1500 because he had not taken his full pay cheque each month, so suddenly he had friends and was a rich man for a few months. He went to Edmonton and bought a stove and some furniture. The interview with Bill Willier of Sucker Creek, 1999, with Interviewer, Brian Calliou, is poor quality. Bill was born March 20, 1921. He never knew his father; his grandmother raised him. He started working for farmers at age 15 at 50 cents a day. He worked with horses, long days but people were happy. He also worked in sawmills and in 1967 in Enilda doing millwork. In the fall he would hunt for 2-3 weeks. He comments that after reaching age 65 “you feel kinda lost”. Commenting on the importance of the treaty, he says that only a few of the promises are left – like Treaty Days – he remembers the ballgames, dances, foot races.
Location: 0007.04.4
Josephine Mercredi, 1999
sound recording
Several people ask questions of Josephine and both questions and answers are mostly in an Indigenous language. The questions are about the Treaty Days celebrations and what she remembers about them. Her husband was a trapper and built a skiff for fishing. She remembers coming to Fort Chip for Christmas.
Location: 0007.04.5
Fred Marcel, 1999
sound recording
The interview was conducted in English, at Fort Chipewyan with 83 year old Fred Marcel. Fred was born at Jack Fish Lake and had no schooling. He trapped with his dad and his dog team. During Treaty Days they all gathered in Fort Chipewyan. He remembers the Drum Dance and the Tea Dance. His uncle was the first chief (then Jonas, then Fred) and the one who signed Treaty 8.
Location: 0007.04.6
Victoria Calliou, 1999
sound recording
Victoria Calliou is being interviewed on Feb 22, 1999 at Sucker Creek by Brian Calliou. She is 76, born March 1, 1922. She is not sure where the name Calliou came from. When she was growing up, when visitors came, the children were not allowed to play where the elders talked (out of respect) so they never heard their stories. Her mother was Margaret, from Wabasca, and she lost six children. In 1919, Moostoos (who married her mother’s sister) was the head man came to get her father for hunting and told him he wanted to leave her father (John) his job since he may not return. He and his wife did not return. (Harold Cardinal, in 1967 found bones and buried Moostoos in Sucker Creek). From 1919-1942 her father was a councilor until he died. The third generation had to leave – for work – and married off the reserve. At age 4 or 5 she lived near the creek. She remembers having a garden, horses, cows and in 1938 they built a log house and barn. In summer they moved to the lake to make hay. They walked or went with team and wagon to High Prairie to the “Red and White” store or Dr. Woods or Dr. Mc Intyre. There were always meetings and people around. She went to school at 9, to St Bernard’s Mission in Grouard, completing grade 5. The Sisters were French Canadian and taught her to pray in Latin, so many times a day. She left to go home since her mother needed help. Victoria reads from a copy of the original Treaty 8 signed by Grouard and a representative of the Queen. Those signing were in two rows, those taking treaty and those taking script. Those in the treaty row were assessed at $12.00 with $7.00 going to Ottawa so the individuals got $5.00. The original ceremony involved a 21 gun salute, red coats and the chief and councilors in their ceremonial dress. Victoria remembers her auntie fished with a net, dried the fish, picked berries, gardened. The jobs available for them were farming, selling cord wood, logging, hunting, making moccasins, hauling freight to and from Sturgeon Lake. It was 7 miles to travel to a store in Enilda. Later on, in Morley, she learned her “old native ways”, the medicines, and there were pilgrimages to the lake at one time. Treaty Day celebrations involved big gatherings, fun games, and dances. “Now we just walk into a building and out…Celebrations are important because our ancestors got this promise…We have forgotten the idea of it.” In 1910 the members of bands were split into 5 bands and each given a reserve. In 1982-83 Victoria was a councilor on the Sucker Creek Band Council. The Slave Lake Regional Council eventually took over from the Indian agent. Victoria had 5 children: Pauline, Genevieve, George, Denise, Alberta.
Location: 0007.04.7
John Testawits, Patti Nooskey, 1999
sound recording
(Interview not very clear) Karen Riley conducts the interview with John Testawits on Aug. 28, 1999 at the Duncan Reserve. John is the grandchild of Duncan who signed the Treaty in 1899. John was born in 1915 in the Shaftesbury settlement. His mother, Julia had five children. The oldest girl drowned. They moved around with the seasons and for hunting – Berwyn- then back to the Peace River valley. They worked for neighbors – for cream, potatoes. The Indian agent came out with rations. Finally they were taken to Grouard mission. In answer to what was the best thing about the mission he says “none really” and what was the worst thing, “the food and punishment”. In 1930 they moved to the Duncan Reserve where 6 new log homes had been built. (see “Bricks Hill and Beyond”) He remembers travelling by foot, a Pow-Wow at Waterhole, the doctor coming with the Indian agent and a story about stealing a rooster involving Jack Brown and Axel Workman. He claims “I am the only one who can correct David Leonard”. (Interview not very clear) Karen Riley conducts the interview with Patti Nooskey on Aug. 28, 1999 at the Duncan Reserve. Patti is the great grandchild of Duncan who signed the Treaty in 1899. She and the rest of her siblings were born on the reserve.
Location: 0007.04.8
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Series 007.05 Correspondence series. — 1988 – 2001. — 8 cm of textual records.

The series consists of correspondence between Fran Moore, coordinator of the Spirit of the Peace, and the museum members; and correspondence from heritage individuals and organizations, including Museums Alberta, regarding projects.

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Series 007.06 Newsletter series. — 1989 – 2002. — 8 cm of textual records.

Series consists of originals or copies of quarterly newsletters written and compiled by Fran Moore, with submissions from participating museums.

Newsletter #41, March 6, 2000
Newsletter
Creator: Newsletter
Newsletter contains the Spirit of the Peace Agenda for the March 6 meeting in Grouard Alberta, minutes from the meeting, and submissions from member organizations describing what they have been up to. As part of the meeting they reported on their progress on the Treaty 8 project, the Spirit of the Peace Brochure, and the Regional Quilt project.
Location: 0007.06.01
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