From the Vault Friday: Wanted Poster

Image: SPRA 002.04.06.02

Todays “From the Vault Friday” features a poster from the Beth Sheehan fonds (fonds 002).

The poster is advertising the Stage Door Theatre production of The Balled of Knobby Clarke, on April 21, 1976. The artist is Tim Heimdal.

Read more about the Beth Sheehan fonds (fonds 002) here.

From the Vault Friday is a social media campaign that highlights interesting materials from the collections of the South Peace Regional Archives. This project was made possible by an Access to Holdings Grant from the Archives Society of Alberta.

Farewell SPRA! A Reflection on my Student Work Term

Above: Archives Assistant (Student), Kaydence Redding, processing an album from the Hines-Sutherland Family fonds.

This summer I had the incredible opportunity to return to the South Peace Regional Archives (SPRA) in my former role of Archives Assistant (Student). Once again, my summer spent at SPRA has been incredibly rewarding and enjoyable. I have learned more about the important role archives play in preserving our history, and I am proud to have played a part in this through my various processing projects. Over the last four months I completed the processing of two new fonds, the Bezanson Community Blooms fonds (645) and the Hines-Sutherland Family fonds (679). I also processed an accrual to the South Peace Regional Archives Sound Recording Collection (504) which consisted of 4 interviews of former Alberta Provincial Police Officers. Additionally, I worked on a newspaper inventory and rehousing project, during which I was able to inventory and rehouse over 2.5 meters of newspapers!

While processing was among my favorite activities this summer, I was thankful to work on projects such as the #ThrowbackThursday Facebook campaign, hosting an online education session with the Grande Prairie Public Library, and writing Telling Our Stories articles. All of these activities focused on public outreach and helped me build connections to the communities and people of the South Peace throughout my work term.

For me, one of the more important aspects of my role this summer was the work I did on projects related to Reconciliation. This included working on the Library and Archives Canada funded project “Reclaiming the Past, Reclaiming Their Stories: Indigenous Records”, presenting a virtual session with the Grande Prairie Public Library on our findings from the Indigenous Records project, and writing articles about Indigenous-related content to be featured in future Telling Our Stories magazines. An additional resource I worked on, that I hope will have long lasting impact, was the Indigenous Records Research Guide that can be found on the SPRA website. The vast amount of material available on our website may make it hard to know where to start when researching Indigenous history. In order to help with this, the research guide compiles lists of the fonds, library books, reference files, and Telling Our Stories articles within the archives collections that have Indigenous-related content in order to make this content more easily accessible for everyone.

After my first work term at SPRA last summer, I was inspired to switch my field of study into something that would allow me to pursue a Master’s Degree in Archival Studies in my future. After spending a second summer immersed in the archival world, I couldn’t be happier with my decision. These past four months have taught me so much about the possible obstacles and victories that come along with working in the archival field. Every piece of information that I gained throughout the last two summers has left me immensely excited to learn more in the future, and reinforced my desire to become an archivist one day. I am beyond thankful for the opportunity to have worked at SPRA once again, I will greatly miss getting to collaborate with SPRA’s amazing staff, Stephanie and Teresa, and the ability to immerse myself in the history of the South Peace on a daily basis.

This post was contributed by Kaydence Redding, the Archives Assistant (Student). This position is made possible thanks to funding from Young Canada Works in Heritage Organizations.

Soldier Spotlight: Margaret Schadeck

Image: Margaret’s discharge certificate, cropped (Fonds 131)

Margaret Alma Stevens (Regtl. No. W3225) was born July 8, 1907, in Easton’s Corners, Ontario. She attended school there until Grade 9, later taking a course in Business College in Ottawa. Her parents, Mr. & Mrs. William Stevens, lived at Kemptville, ON when she enlisted at Kingston, ON. in 1942. Margaret joined the Canadian Women Army Corps (CWAC), No. 7 Company, and trained at Barriefield, ON in 1943, where she met Eddie Schadeck. She served as a clerk at Fort Frontenac, Kingston until her discharge in 1946. Her interests included riding horses and writing poetry and songs. Margaret started army correspondence courses while at Barriefield and continued them in Brockville, ON after she was discharged, and in Wembley after she married Eddie in 1946. Their farm was located south of Huallen in the Wembley area. In the 1950s, they moved to Salmon Arm, where they lived until Margaret passed away in 1999.

Margaret Stevens, Canadian Women’s Army Corps, 1942 c. (SPRA 131.02.01)

 

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

From the Vault Friday: South Peace Horticultural Society

Image: SPRA Fonds 021

Today’s “From the Vault Friday” features a program for the South Peace Horticultural Society’s 9th Annual Flower Show in June 1977.  The South Peace Horticultural Society was formed in 1969. The society was a member of the Alberta Horticultural Association and its major projects each year were the Spring and Fall flower shows. This was later downsized to one annual flower show. In 1975, the Society adopted the pansy as its symbol, after the Grande Prairie City Council rejected it as the flower emblem of the city. The Society then had a 9 month long artwork competition, open to the public, to design a crest. The winner, Irene Pearcy, won a cash prize of $10 and a copy of the embroidered crest.

Image: Photo of the crest, SPRA Fonds 021

In addition to the Flower Shows, the Society worked on a variety of projects, from co-sponsored landscaping classes to a vegetable project in conjunction with John G.N. Davidson, Ph. D. from the Beaverlodge Research Station.

The club disbanded in 1987.

Read more about the South Peace Horticultural Society fonds (Fonds 021) here and and in the June 2019 edition of Telling Our Stories here

From the Vault Friday is a social media campaign that highlights interesting materials from the collections of the South Peace Regional Archives. This project was made possible by an Access to Holdings Grant from the Archives Society of Alberta.

Cooking With Betty: Jobs, Entertainment, and Cakes

Cooking with Betty is a new limited-run blog series showcasing transcriptions from the Betty Welter Fonds. Each week, we will be sharing Betty’s recipes and her thoughts on raising children in Grande Prairie during the 1950’s. Each blog post will feature recipes from her handwritten recipe book and excerpts from her reflection piece Raising Children in Grande Prairie during the 50’s. This blog series is made possible by volunteer Suzanne Dunn, who transcribed the records, and practicum student Alec Moreau, who compiled the posts. We will try to keep things short, simple, and sweet!

 

All good things must come to an end, and today we bid goodbye to Cooking with Betty. To finish things off, this final excerpt from Raising Children in Grande Prairie during the 50’s includes employment and recreation opportunities Betty gave her children:

JOBS
Yes – they all had paper-routes and did errands for some neighbors. Fred was offered an after-school job at a bicycle shop on main street at 25 cents an hour, cleaning up on Saturday an after on assembling bikes. The older ones babysat a bit in the late 50’s at 25 cents an hour also.

 

ENTERTAINMENT
All in Sunday School and choirs. Red Cross swimming lessons at the outdoor pool in summer months. Girls in Guides and Brownies, boys in Cubs & Scouts. Girls in a 4H clothing club that I led for years and boys in hockey. All took piano lessons from the Sisters; $1.00 for a half hour as I recall.

For the final post in this series we’ve saved the best for last, it’s time for an extravaganza of cake recipes! (That Chocolate Cream Cake sure sounds tasty… I should really go eat lunch.)

Matrimonial Cake (M. Brown)

 

1 1/4 c w. sugar
1 1/4 c oatmeal
3/4 c b. sugar
1/2 tsp salt
3/4 “ soda

 

Rub all together & put half in bottom of pan.

 

Filling: 2 c chopped dates
1/2 c sugar

 

Nuts and raisins may be added, enough H2O to boil. Cook in slow oven.

Chocolate Cream Cake (Gerty Meyers)

 

2 tbsp. melted butter
1 c. w. sugar
4 tbsp. cocoa
1/2 tsp. soda
2 eggs
1 tsp. vanilla
1 3/4 c. flour
1 tsp. b. powder
1/4 tsp. salt
1 c. cream

 

Method:
Cream butter & sugar. Add to cocoa sufficient boiling water to dissolve it & add soda. Combine with first mixture. Beat in eggs & add vanilla. Sift flour with baking powder & salt & add alternately with cream to rest of mixture. Bake in layer cake tins in moderate oven of 350oF for 25 min. May bake in long pan.

Spice Cake (M. Brown)

 

1/2 c butter
1 c b. sugar
2 eggs
1 tbsp. molasses
3 tsp. b. powder
½ tsp. cinnamon
1/2 “ nutmeg
2 c sifted flour
1 c sweet milk

 

Mix as usual & bake.

Dream Cake (M.B.)

 

1 c flour
1/2 c butter

 

Mix well , put in pan & bake a short time.

 

2 eggs
1 1/2 c. b. sugar
1 c. walnuts [sic]

1/2 c cocoanut [sic]
2 heaping tsp. flour
1/2 tsp. b. powder.
Pinch salt.

Thanks for joining us for Cooking with Betty! To learn more about Betty, and to read transcriptions of her records, be sure to visit the Betty Welter Fonds.

Image: A page from Betty’s handwritten cookbook (From SPRA 0129.07.01)

Cooking With Betty: Chores and Cream Puffs

Cooking with Betty is a new limited-run blog series showcasing transcriptions from the Betty Welter Fonds. Each week, we will be sharing Betty’s recipes and her thoughts on raising children in Grande Prairie during the 1950’s. Each blog post will feature recipes from her handwritten recipe book and excerpts from her reflection piece Raising Children in Grande Prairie during the 50’s. This blog series is made possible by volunteer Suzanne Dunn, who transcribed the records, and practicum student Alec Moreau, who compiled the posts. We will try to keep things short, simple, and sweet!

 

This week, we are sharing Betty’s no-nonsense perspectives on transportation and household chores. Enjoy this latest excerpt from Raising Children in Grande Prairie during the 50’s:

TRANSPORTATION
Children walked everywhere. Older ones had bikes in the late 50’s.

 

CHORES
Children all helped with assigned chores, according to their age. Helped in the garden preparing fruit or vegetables for preserving. We had coal and wood stoves ’til mid-50’s so helped with splitting wood and kindling, carrying coal and ashes.

We are also bringing you an assortment of recipes for entertaining. The cream puffs sure sound good!

Apple Crisp

 

5 or 6 apples, peeled, sliced in a pudding dish. Sprinkle with cinnamon & 1/2 c. sugar
Add 3 tbsp. water
Blend for crumbs 2 tbsp butter
1 c sugar (brown)
2/3 c. flour

 

Sprinkle over apples & bake in a mod. oven until brown.

Curled Celery

 

1. Cut celery stalks in 2 1/2 “ sticks
2. Slash from each end of the strip to within 1/2″ from centre
3. Place in salted water to curl, about 1/2 hour.

Cream Puffs (Anna)

 

1 c si. flour
3 c. butter
1 c. boiling H2O
3 eggs unbeaten

 

Sift flour once. Melt shortening in water. Stir flour into rapidly boiling H2O. Cook & stir constantly until mixture leaves sides of pan in smooth compact mass. Remove + eggs one at a time beating only until smooth 20-40 sec. Shape on ungreased baking sheet, rounds or strips 5×1”. Bake in hot oven 450o 20 min. then reduce heat to moderate 350oF & bake 25 min. longer. With sharp knife make slit in one side insert Custard Cream Filling. Cover with Hungarian Choc. Frosting. Makes 12

Join us next week as we continue Cooking with Betty!

Image: A page from Betty’s handwritten cookbook (From SPRA 0129.07.01)

New Fonds Available!

Image: Toddler Lucy Hines riding on the back of a zebra. Ca. 1908 (SPRA 0679.01.003)

We are pleased to announce that our Archives Assistant Student, Kaydence Redding, has completed processing a new collection, the Hines-Sutherland fonds! Although we have been closed to the public due to the ongoing pandemic, we have remained hard at work making records accessible for public use. Processing the Hines-Sutherland family fonds has been one of our many recent projects and we are thrilled to share the results with you!

Alfred Hines ran a game farm for Sir Anthony Wingfield in Ampthill Bedfordshire, England at the beginning of the twentieth century. The game farm was home to many exotic animals including camels, zebras, llamas, and ostriches. It was likely at the game farm that Alfred met his wife, Octavia Beeata Hines, who worked for the neighbors as a maid. Alfred and Octavia’s eldest children, Helen and Lucy, were raised on the game farm until the family immigrated to Canada in 1910. Helen Hines later married Seath Sutherland, the couple homesteaded in the South Peace Region along with their twelve children and were some of the earliest pioneers in the area. The photo album contains 124 pictures of the Hines family while living and working at the Wingfield estate game farm ran by Alfred Hines. A majority of the photographs are of various family members, and other farm employees, riding and walking the animals at the Ampthill game farm. There are also a number of portraits included in the album, and a handful of photographs of the Hines family from their time working at the Partridge farm in Saskatchewan after immigrating to Canada.

This fonds is available for consultation on our website using the finding aid: Fonds 679 Hines-Sutherland Family fonds, and through a selection of digitized photographs that are viewable on Alberta on Record.

Cooking With Betty: Shopping and Hot Drinks

Cooking with Betty is a new limited-run blog series showcasing transcriptions from the Betty Welter Fonds. Each week, we will be sharing Betty’s recipes and her thoughts on raising children in Grande Prairie during the 1950’s. Each blog post will feature recipes from her handwritten recipe book and excerpts from her reflection piece Raising Children in Grande Prairie during the 50’s. This blog series is made possible by volunteer Suzanne Dunn, who transcribed the records, and practicum student Alec Moreau, who compiled the posts. We will try to keep things short, simple, and sweet!

 

When we think of “delivery” nowadays we think of pizza and packages, but in the 50’s essentials such as water and fuel for heating and cooking had be be delivered, as you can see in this week’s section of Raising Children in Grande Prairie during the 50’s:

DELIVERY
Water was delivered by horse-drawn tank, either on wheels or sleighs to areas without water and sewer lines. Milk delivered daily, same way as above, in quart bottles. They were washed and returned. We bought tickets 11 for $1.00, and higher later on. Bread also delivered from our local bakery. Groceries delivered from local stores. Coal and wood when necessary and ordered. Bread was 10 cents a loaf, very little brown bread then.

 

SHOPPING
Mostly local stores on main street. Walked to pick things out and carried home if possible or picked up when Jack got home from work with vehicle. Used mail orders too from Eaton’s and Simpson’s.

Enjoy a pair of recipes for hot drinks today! I’m a little curious how they compare to modern instant powders.

Reception Cocoa

 

1/2 c. cocoa
1/4 “ flour
1/2 “ sugar
1 qt. boiling water
1 “ scalded milk

 

Mix the 3 dry ingredients, add boiling water and cook for 10 min. Add hot milk and add salt or vanilla, beat thoroughly just before serving.
This reception cocoa is used for serving large quantities as it doesn’t separate.

Spanish Chocolate

 

2 c. milk
2 sq. chocolate
1 cup boiling water
1/8 tsp. salt
1/4 c. sugar
1 cup strong coffee

 

Mix chocolate, sugar and salt with the water and cook for 3 min. Then add milk and bring to scalding point., add coffee, beat thoroughly with egg beater until it develop [sic] a foam. You may serve with whipped cream or marshmallow or chill and serve with frozen milk or ice cream.

Join us next week as we continue Cooking with Betty!

Image: A page from Betty’s handwritten cookbook (From SPRA 0129.07.01)

Cooking With Betty: Clothing, Food, and Cold Drinks

Cooking with Betty is a new limited-run blog series showcasing transcriptions from the Betty Welter Fonds. Each week, we will be sharing Betty’s recipes and her thoughts on raising children in Grande Prairie during the 1950’s. Each blog post will feature recipes from her handwritten recipe book and excerpts from her reflection piece Raising Children in Grande Prairie during the 50’s. This blog series is made possible by volunteer Suzanne Dunn, who transcribed the records, and practicum student Alec Moreau, who compiled the posts. We will try to keep things short, simple, and sweet!

 

Food and clothing are big expense items for growing children. Here’s how Betty dealt with them in this week’s Raising Children in Grande Prairie during the 50’s:

CLOTHING
I sewed and knitted nearly all the clothing save underwear, socks, shoes and boots. Used made-overs a lot.

 

FOOD
Big garden, canned about 500 jars every year. Picked wild berries. Jack a hunter and we used a lot of wild meat (usually moose) every winter and birds (prairie-chickens, partridge and wild geese.) Vagts butcher shop started a frozen locker business and we rented a locker for several years and then got our own freezer. This eliminated a lot of vegetable canning.

With the temperatures rising, these homemade cold drinks could be just what you need to cool down:

Ginger Beer (Mother’s recipe)

 

1 oz. ground ginger
2 lemons
2 # wh. sugar
1 oz. cream of tartar
1 yeast cake

 

Put first 3 ingred. In 1 gal H2O & boil 10 min. Add cold H2O till luke warm. Let stand till cool add yeast & cr. of tartar. Stir well & bottle.

Lemon Cordial

 

Rind & juice of 3 lemons
1 1/2 lbs of white sugar
1 pt boiling H2O
1 oz tartaric acid
Pour H2O over rind & juice of lemon
Let come to boil.
+ sugar when cold + tartaric acid strain & bottle.

Join us next week as we continue Cooking with Betty!

Image: A page from Betty’s handwritten cookbook (From SPRA 0129.07.01)

Indigenous Depictions in Parade Footage

Above: Still from “Wedding, Parade, Christmas, and Travels.” 8mm film ca. 1969. (Fonds 039: Bert and Miriam Tieman Fonds, SPRA 1985.3.82F)

The South Peace Regional Archives aims to gather, preserve, and share the historical records of the South Peace Region of Alberta, now and in the future. These records reflect the personal, cultural, social, economic, and political life of the South Peace River Country of Alberta. These records often contain language and imagery that are representative of the time in which they were created. As a result, they may include instances of problematic wording, cultural references, and stereotypes that are no longer used or appropriate today.

While completing a recent multimedia project, our staff discovered several archival films with historic parade footage; some scenes include parade floats or costumes depicting Indigenous people that would now be considered offensive. It is not always clear from the footage whether the persons depicted are themselves Indigenous or in what context they were included in the parade. Therefore, it is not always possible to know whether these are instances of self-representation or misrepresentation. Rather than remove this content, we want to acknowledge its presence and potentially hurtful impact.

The South Peace Regional Archives is committed to continuing our path forward in the Reconciliation process. To remove these depictions would mean erasing evidence of the systemic racism and discrimination that many Indigenous people have faced in our community, both in the past and still to this day. In several cases, removing these depictions would mean erasing how some Indigenous people represented themselves. This decision was made in consultation with the SPRA Indigenous History Committee and in accordance with the Association of Canadian Archivists’ Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct and the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. All future posts that contain these films will include a content note referring readers to this post.

We are currently completing a major project to identify and address materials related to Indigenous peoples within the collection in order to provide culturally-appropriate descriptions and contextual information. This work is part of our ongoing effort to “serve the community as an inclusive, participatory archives: one that all can contribute to and access community history” (South Peace Regional Archives Strategic Goals, 2019-2022). If you, or anyone you know, has information that would help us contextualize these depictions, we encourage you to reach out to the Archives.

 

We acknowledge with respect that the South Peace Regional Archives is located on the ancestral and traditional lands of many Indigenous peoples. This territory is covered by Treaty 8, signed in 1899. The continuing relationship between Indigenous peoples and this land contributes to the rich knowledge and culture of the South Peace region.

We are grateful to serve the people on this land and honor the Calls for Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.