Soldier Spotlight: Eva Nadkrynechny

Photograph: Tatiana & Alex Nadkrynechny with daughters Anne and Eva, ca. 1932.  Source: Where the Red Willow Grew, p. 558

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Eva Nadkrynechny was born on January 26, 1926 in Reshnivka, Ukraine which was occupied by Poland at the time. Eva immigrated to Canada with her parents and sister in 1929, landing in Halifax on April 1. After travelling to Edmonton, they went to Glendon where her father had put a down payment on a farm. After three years, they couldn’t make the payments on the land and they left. Her father then filed for homestead in Sunset House, southwest of High Prairie. The family came to High Prairie in the spring of 1932 and traveled to the homestead along the “winter trail.”

In 1936, the family moved to Edmonton and Eva and her sister went to a regular school. Eva was an excellent student. In the spring of 1938 the family returned to Sunset House. After walking to High Prairie for her mother to receive her Canadian Citizenship certificate, Eva’s brother. Ken, was born. In June, Eva wrote the grade eight departmental exam and completed her education. That fall, Eva moved to High Prairie to work. She sent money and clothes back to her family.

Eva enlisted in the RCAF (WD) and graduated at the head of her photography class. She also completed high school. Eva spent the war in Rockcliffe, Ontario, working in air mapping. After being honourably discharged, Eva worked as a pattern and style designer in the textile industry and at the time of her death in 1977, she was teaching at Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario.

Eva passed away on January 20, 1977 at MacMaster Hospital. She was predeceased by her husband, Ted Murray.

Sources:
The Military Service Recognition Book, Vol. VI (p.245)
Where The Red Willow Grew (p.557)

Renaming the Past, Reclaiming Their Stories: Indigenous Records at the South Peace Regional Archives

Hudson’s Bay Buildings, Fort St. John, [ca. 1949]. SPRA 032.08.08.0945 Part of Campbell Family fonds

 

The South Peace Regional Archives initiated a survey of the region’s holdings in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) call to actions to locate records within their holdings related to Indian Residential Schools. We found very few records related to residential schools, but we did find several records related to Indigenous people and communities in our region. We decided to expand the scope of our research to look for any records related to Indigenous peoples within our holdings.

Thanks to the efforts of staff and volunteers, we now have a small database of material to share. While we pursue avenues of access, we are sharing some of these images and documents.

The original caption on the back of the photograph states: “Two of the old Hudson Bay Co’s Buildings on the Peace River – Old Fort St John. There were originally 3 b’l’dg’s – One was burned a few years ago. It was the store house that was burned. No 1. was the store where articles were exchanged for furs etc. with Indians who came in canoes on Peace River. N 2. was the Court House The little room at the End was the jail. The Factor was also in charge. Many thrilling events occurred here.”

Ft. St. John, demolished shortly after this photograph was taken, was the unlikely home of two Ft. Dunvegan fur trade ledgers discovered by a Canadian engineer on the Alaska Highway crew. Originally created to document the business of the fort, these two ledgers contain information about some of the Indigenous families living and trading in the region in the early to mid-1800s. Like many of the documents and photographs preserved in the SPRA, the ledgers have taken on an informational life beyond their original creator’s intent.

If you have any stories you would like to share, or questions you want to ask about your family’s ties to the fur trade, we would love to hear from you. Please contact us at info@southpeacearchives.org or 780-830-5105.

Soldier Spotlight: Harold Austin Wellwood

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Regimental Number: 427665
Rank: Lance Corporal
Branch: 13th Battalion

Harold was born in Dundalk, Ontario on October 19, 1896. He enlisted in the Canadian Army in Moose Jaw in September of 1915. On September 3, 1916, Harold was dangerously wounded at the Somme (Mouquet Farm). He suffered from shrapnel wounds to the left side of his face, and was in hospital until he was invalided to Canada in June of 1917. The injuries caused vision problems in Harold’s left eye, and hearing problems in his left ear. He also had trouble eating and suffered from headaches. A note in his service file dated May 1917 stated that “the board recommend that he be invalided home without delay.” Harold was discharged on October 31, 1917. He came to the Grande Prairie area, where his brother Edward was homesteading, and filed on land at NE 12-73-5-W6. Harold died on September 19, 1949.

Renaming the Past, Reclaiming Their Stories: Indigenous Records at the South Peace Regional Archives

Photograph: Cree Family Guides, 1935. SPRA 177.070 Part of Ann Macklin fonds

The South Peace Regional Archives initiated a survey of the region’s holdings in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) call to actions to locate records within their holdings related to Indian Residential Schools. We found very few records related to residential schools, but we did find several records related to Indigenous people and communities in our region. We decided to expand the scope of our research to look for any records related to Indigenous peoples within our holdings.

Thanks to the efforts of staff and volunteers, we now have a small database of material to share. While we pursue avenues of access, we would like to start sharing some of these images and documents.

This photo (SPRA 177.070) is captioned “Two Cree families accompanied us on our trip. They killed our meat–moose, deer, bear, porcupine and skunk–and picked cranberries and blueberries for us. They pitched our tents and packed our horses. Last, but not least they were our guides.” This photo is part of the Ann Macklin fonds; Ann Macklin (nee Roberts) was born at the Kathryn Prittie Hospital and grew up on her parents homestead in the Clairmont area. Ann Roberts, Violet Jebb, and Mr. Bredin took a trip to Nose Mountain in September 1935 and had two Cree families join them as their guides.  The guides in these photos are not identified.

If you know who they might be, or have any stories to share about Indigenous people in the area, we would love to hear from you! Please contact us at info@southpeacearchives.org or 780-830-5105 to share any memories or information you have!

Soldier Spotlight: Elmer Bayley

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Regiment: The Loyal Edmonton Royal Canadian Infantry Corps (R.C.I.C)
Regimental Number: M/ 17157
Rank: Private
Grave Reference: VI. A. 3
Cemetery: Ravenna War Cemetery, Italy, No. 4

Elmer Bayley was the son of George Stedman and Ena Jean Bayley, and he was born in July of 1918. He grew up in Saskatchewan and his mother died early in his life. After his father remarried to Ruth, they moved to the Grande Prairie area in 1929, while Elmer and two other siblings stayed with relatives. Elmer joined them in 1930 and attended the Twilight school. The family settled on a homestead in Crooked Creek where eventually there were 14 siblings. Elmer (and his brother Orval) joined the army, and Elmer was posted in Italy where he was killed in action on January 27, 1945. The quote on his gravestone reads: “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

Source: Smoky River to Grande Prairie p. 528
Across the Smoky p. 347 Roll of Honour
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Renaming the Past, Reclaiming Their Stories: Indigenous Records at the South Peace Regional Archives

Jim Ferguson. 1940. SPRA 0179.04.03 Part of Mary Belcourt Davis fonds (cropped)

The South Peace Regional Archives initiated a survey of the region’s holdings in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) call to actions to locate records within their holdings related to Indian Residential Schools. We found very few records related to residential schools, but we did find several records related to Indigenous people and communities in our region. We decided to expand the scope of our research to look for any records related to Indigenous peoples within our holdings.

Thanks to the efforts of staff and volunteers, we now have a small database of material to share. While we pursue avenues of access, we would like to start sharing some of these images and documents.

“Jim Ferguson, son of St. Pierre Ferguson and Philomene Callihoo, served in World War II along with his brothers Malcolm and Henry.” Jim was one of the over 3,000 Indigenous people who served during the war. We know only a few of the stories of our South Peace Veterans, and fewer still for Indigenous veterans.

If you have any stories you would like to share about your service, or the service of family members, we would love to hear from you. Please contact us at info@southpeacearchives.org or 780-830-5105.

Soldier Spotlight: Private Alfred Cox

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Regimental Number: 1039075
Rank: Private
Branch: 239th Battalion, Canadian Railway Construction Corps; 6th Canadian Railway Troops

Alfred was born on May 30, 1882 in London, England. He filed on a homestead at 23-76-3-W6. When he enlisted on July 7, 1916, Alfred wrote in his will that he bequeathed all his real estate to “some wounded returned soldier, who wishes to file on a homestead.” Towards the end of the war, he suffered severely from flat feet. Alfred died in Edmonton on August 26, 1963.

Renaming the Past, Reclaiming Their Stories: Indigenous Records at the South Peace Regional Archives

Photograph: Sturgeon Lake Café, N.D. SPRA 0175.084.04 Part of Valleyview & District Chamber of Commerce Millennium Photograph collection

The South Peace Regional Archives initiated a survey of the region’s holdings in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s (TRC) call to actions to locate records within their holdings related to Indian Residential Schools. We found very few records related to residential schools, but we did find several records related to Indigenous people and communities in our region. We decided to expand the scope of our research to look for any records related to Indigenous peoples within our holdings.

Thanks to the efforts of staff and volunteers, we now have a small database of material to share. While we pursue avenues of access, we would like to start sharing some of these images and documents.

This photo (SPRA 0175.084.04) is from the Valleyview & District Chamber of Commerce Millennium Photograph collection; the photographs were gathered by Mary Ellen MacGregor for the “Journey to the Millenium” collection sponsored by the Valleyview and District Chamber of Commerce.

The photo is captioned “Pierre ?, Bella Badger (Joyce), Teddy Desjarlais, and Pete Joyce in front of the Sturgeon Lake Café, also called Taylor’s.”

If you know who Pierre is, have stories about young Indigenous culture, or Sturgeon Lake Café let us know! Please contact us at info@southpeacearchives.org or 780-830-5105 to share any memories or information you have.

Soldier Spotlight: Francis Victor Tanner

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Regimental Number: M45546
Date of Birth: 1 April 1921
Regiment: 29th Canadian Armoured Regiment

Enlisted in Grande Prairie, Alberta on 14 June 1940.

Francis Victor Tanner (known as Fran) was born in 1921 in Mazanod, Saskatchewan. In the late 1920s the family moved to Grande Prairie where his father prepared ice for the Grande Prairie Curling Club in the Wapiti Arena.This was his introduction to the world of sports. During the Depression, Fran and the local boys played hockey wherever a patch of ice could be found and cleared of snow. When World War II began, Fran enlisted in the South Alberta Regiment and served his country in A Squadron 29th Canadian Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment in NW Europe as a radio operator. He returned to Grande Prairie in 1945 and picked up his interest in sports again. During his first winter home, he was hired by Bill Bessent to help make ice and operate the arena. For a brief time Fran played hockey in the South Peace Hockey League, but he is remembered more as the sports broadcaster on CFGP. His career there began in 1952 as a transmitter operator but soon developed into almost 20 years of announcing hockey games’ play-by-play and providing game analysis and conducting interviews. The South Peace Hockey League recognized his popularity and contribution to hockey by awarding him The Most Valuable Player, and later he became the first media person to be recognized as a Grande Prairie Hockey Legend. Fran died in Grande Prairie March 27, 1984. Fran was a brother to Vera, wife of Jack Soars, who also became a CFGP radio personality.

Photograph: Don and Fran Tanner, 1943 (SPRA 364.01.03)

Fonds 364 Francis Victor Tanner fonds

Telling Our Stories: Coming Soon!

Keep an eye out for our upcoming edition of Telling Our Stories all about the Old West! This magazine will feature articles about women in the rodeo, wild horses, Treaty Eight, the Sturgeon Lake Games, the Lake Saskatoon Games, and the Peace Country Land Settlement database. The Old West edition will come out in early September so keep your eye on the website to find the digital copy, or become a member to have the physical copy mailed to you!