Soldier Spotlight: Eva Nadkrynechny

Photograph: Tatiana & Alex Nadkrynechny with daughters Anne and Eva, ca. 1932.  Source: Where the Red Willow Grew, p. 558

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Eva Nadkrynechny was born on January 26, 1926 in Reshnivka, Ukraine which was occupied by Poland at the time. Eva immigrated to Canada with her parents and sister in 1929, landing in Halifax on April 1. After travelling to Edmonton, they went to Glendon where her father had put a down payment on a farm. After three years, they couldn’t make the payments on the land and they left. Her father then filed for homestead in Sunset House, southwest of High Prairie. The family came to High Prairie in the spring of 1932 and traveled to the homestead along the “winter trail.”

In 1936, the family moved to Edmonton and Eva and her sister went to a regular school. Eva was an excellent student. In the spring of 1938 the family returned to Sunset House. After walking to High Prairie for her mother to receive her Canadian Citizenship certificate, Eva’s brother. Ken, was born. In June, Eva wrote the grade eight departmental exam and completed her education. That fall, Eva moved to High Prairie to work. She sent money and clothes back to her family.

Eva enlisted in the RCAF (WD) and graduated at the head of her photography class. She also completed high school. Eva spent the war in Rockcliffe, Ontario, working in air mapping. After being honourably discharged, Eva worked as a pattern and style designer in the textile industry and at the time of her death in 1977, she was teaching at Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario.

Eva passed away on January 20, 1977 at MacMaster Hospital. She was predeceased by her husband, Ted Murray.

Sources:
The Military Service Recognition Book, Vol. VI (p.245)
Where The Red Willow Grew (p.557)

Soldier Spotlight: Elmer Bayley

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Regiment: The Loyal Edmonton Royal Canadian Infantry Corps (R.C.I.C)
Regimental Number: M/ 17157
Rank: Private
Grave Reference: VI. A. 3
Cemetery: Ravenna War Cemetery, Italy, No. 4

Elmer Bayley was the son of George Stedman and Ena Jean Bayley, and he was born in July of 1918. He grew up in Saskatchewan and his mother died early in his life. After his father remarried to Ruth, they moved to the Grande Prairie area in 1929, while Elmer and two other siblings stayed with relatives. Elmer joined them in 1930 and attended the Twilight school. The family settled on a homestead in Crooked Creek where eventually there were 14 siblings. Elmer (and his brother Orval) joined the army, and Elmer was posted in Italy where he was killed in action on January 27, 1945. The quote on his gravestone reads: “Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”

Source: Smoky River to Grande Prairie p. 528
Across the Smoky p. 347 Roll of Honour
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Soldier Spotlight: Francis Victor Tanner

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Regimental Number: M45546
Date of Birth: 1 April 1921
Regiment: 29th Canadian Armoured Regiment

Enlisted in Grande Prairie, Alberta on 14 June 1940.

Francis Victor Tanner (known as Fran) was born in 1921 in Mazanod, Saskatchewan. In the late 1920s the family moved to Grande Prairie where his father prepared ice for the Grande Prairie Curling Club in the Wapiti Arena.This was his introduction to the world of sports. During the Depression, Fran and the local boys played hockey wherever a patch of ice could be found and cleared of snow. When World War II began, Fran enlisted in the South Alberta Regiment and served his country in A Squadron 29th Canadian Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment in NW Europe as a radio operator. He returned to Grande Prairie in 1945 and picked up his interest in sports again. During his first winter home, he was hired by Bill Bessent to help make ice and operate the arena. For a brief time Fran played hockey in the South Peace Hockey League, but he is remembered more as the sports broadcaster on CFGP. His career there began in 1952 as a transmitter operator but soon developed into almost 20 years of announcing hockey games’ play-by-play and providing game analysis and conducting interviews. The South Peace Hockey League recognized his popularity and contribution to hockey by awarding him The Most Valuable Player, and later he became the first media person to be recognized as a Grande Prairie Hockey Legend. Fran died in Grande Prairie March 27, 1984. Fran was a brother to Vera, wife of Jack Soars, who also became a CFGP radio personality.

Photograph: Don and Fran Tanner, 1943 (SPRA 364.01.03)

Fonds 364 Francis Victor Tanner fonds

Soldier Spotlight: Michael Cashaback

Photograph: Community reception for approximately 100 men in civilian and military clothing during World War II, 1942 (SPRA 1969.39.723)

 

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

The only son of Nicholas and Pauline Cashaback, Mike was born on November 15, 1919 in Cochrane, ON. He moved with his family from Ontario to Edmonton in the mid 1920s, and 2 years later to Esher (now Silverwood near Rycroft) where he received his education to grade 8. In 1941 Mike joined the Canadian Army as a blacksmith, but was employed as a cook. Later he became a provost (with the military police). Mike married Evelyn Betty Lamper on July 21, 1942. While in Holland, Mike was wounded on March 19, 1945 at Niemagen, and he sailed back to Canada on the hospital ship S.S. Nelson, returning to Silverwood. After the war, Mike tried farming, then worked as a blacksmith and in a lumberyard. In 1958 he became the Rycroft Village Policeman. The Cashaback family had 4 children by this time: Michael, Ozann, Gail, and Debra, and they moved to Grimshaw AB in 1962. There Mike continued police work until 1964, and began building houses for J. B. Tissington in Grimshaw and Peace River. When Evelyn Betty and Mike divorced in 1975, he moved to Madeira BC, keeping active in the Legion and Lions club. He passed away in Vancouver on November 9, 1981, and his ashes were spread on Pender Harbour, his favourite fishing spot.

Source:
Chepi Sepe p. 183 (photo)
Wheatfields and Wildflowers p. 461

Soldier Spotlight: Daniel Rycroft

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Daniel Rycroft was born in Spirit River on October 24, 1924 to Helen and Robert Henry Rycroft. In 1928 the family left the area to eventually reside in Smoky Heights where Danny took all of his school. In November 1942, shortly after his eighteenth birthday, he enlisted in the RCAF. He was on duty overseas in 1944 when he was reported missing in action. A month later his mother received news that he was alive. His plane had been forced down but he had bailed out and had been taken in by a French family. The French underground were able to assist his return to England where he was hospitalized for a fractured spine and ribs. After returning home, he married Violet Spry in May 1945. They raised a family of six children: Loraine, Greg, Bill, Neil, Jean, and Jack. Danny became a grain buyer for National Grain Co. and then Alberta Wheat Pool for eighteen years. In 1974 he went to work for the County of Grande Prairie. Danny Rycroft died on April 13, 2011.

Photograph: Home on a Christmas leave in Sexsmith, 1944. Picture taken at Sexsmith Train Station. From Left: Ross, Hawkstead, J. Johnson, Danny Rycroft, Sorken. (SPRA 292.02.06)

Read about the Daniel Rycroft fonds here at the Archives

View photographs from Daniel’s collection

Soldier Spotlight: Helen Mary “Nellie” Craig

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Force: R. C. A. F. (W. D.)

Nellie Craig was born in Scotland in 1920 to parents James and Sibella (Muir) Craig. With her parents and 3 siblings she immigrated to Canada and settled in the Peace River Country in 1930. The parents rented farms in the Wembley area for 13 years, and the children attended Hermit Lake School and the Klondyke Trail School. Both Nellie and her brother, Charlie, served in World War II. Nellie enlisted in June 1942 with the Women’s Air Force, and she was posted in Davidson, Saskatchewan and Penhold, Alberta in the Post Office Division. Previously, Helen had worked at the Wembley post office for 3 years. Upon her discharge in May 1945, Helen worked as the secretary for the Assistant Minister of Education in Edmonton. In November 1948 she married James Coulson, and the couple had two children: Tom and Maureen. Nellie died at age 85 in May 2006 in Edmonton.

Photograph: The Craig family, from Along the Wapiti, p. 213

Source:
Along the Wapiti p. 213 (story & photograph); p. 412 (Name in WWII Veterans list)
Lake Saskatoon Reflections p. 122-124
AGS website – Obituary Index

Soldier Spotlight: Frederick Bruce Albright

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this new blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Service Number: R76714
Force: Air
Regiment: Royal Canadian Air Force
Rank: Flight Sergeant

Bruce Albright was born March 2, 1914, the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Albright of Beaverlodge, AB. At age 26 in 1940 he enlisted in the RCAF as a pilot, and was stationed in Yorkton, SK. On August 16, 1941 Bruce was given his wings. He was sent overseas and took part in at least two big German raids. According to a news article, Bruce was captain of a Wellington bomber, and promoted to Flight Sergeant on June 1, 1941. It is believed that he was killed in action on June 2, 1942 while being east of Brussels in Belgium. Bruce was the first communicant of the United Church in Beaverlodge to give his life in WWII.  He is remembered by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Source: Grande Prairie Herald Aug. 28, 1941; Sept. 4, 1941; Aug 27, 1942; Nov. 25, 1943; Beaverlodge High Year Book 1947-48 p.26

Photograph: Bruce Albright and his woodpile, 1928

The Vultures of War

This item from the Nov. 8, 1935 paper calling on all citizens to commemorate Remembrance Day, refers to the Italo-Ethiopian War, one of the many smaller conflicts that took place between WWI and WWII. The result was Ethiopia’s subjection to Italian rule, and is often seen as one of the episodes that prepared the way for WWII, as it demonstrated the ineffectiveness of the League of Nations when League decisions were not supported by the general powers. The war, by giving substance to Italian imperialist claims, contributed to international tensions between the fascist states and the Western democracies. (Encyclopedia Britannica).

Nov. 8, 1935

Nov. 8, 1935

Written and researched by Kathryn Auger

 

This Week in History – 1943

Training in Grande Prairie. The building in the background is the Courthouse which was standing where the Centre for Creative Arts now sits on the corner of 99 St. and 101 Ave.

Training in Grande Prairie. The large building in the background is the Courthouse which was standing where the Centre for Creative Arts now sits on the corner of 99 St. and 101 Ave.

The April 8, 1943 issue of the Herald Tribune seemed to have an unusually large number of articles and ads to do with the war effort. The four items I have chosen are a glimpse of how daily life, even in remote northern Alberta, was affected by war.

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News Items from the December 9, 1943 Newspaper

Sexsmith boys Ken Nelson, Gordon Rycroft & Allen Tink home for Christmas, 1942.

Sexsmith boys Ken Nelson, Gordon Rycroft & Allen Tink home for Christmas, 1942.

This week, instead of picking one subject, I have chosen various articles from one paper. War news was a very large part of the papers at that time, as shown by 3 articles from the front page. Also interesting to note is that the Christmas light up downtown lasted from December 18 until Christmas Eve – one week only.

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The items from page 6 are fillers, but they illustrate some of the difficulties being experienced in Britain. We are more familiar with the larger issues faced by the people there, but these items show the extent to which everyday life was affected.

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