More From Moose Creek City, & Other News Around the District

Hope you’re not getting tired of the news from Moose Creek City – but I found this column in the January 28, 1915 paper and couldn’t resist one last time.  The original report of the “Ice Boat Adventure” had been in the December 10, 1914 paper, and almost six weeks later it was still being mentioned.  It must have been one of the most exciting things to happen around there for a long time.  It is also interesting to notice that the same people get mentioned in the columns every time – either they are the most prominent citizens of the area, or there aren’t very many people to write about!

In the January 27, 1938 issue of the Northern Tribune, the area news columns from Scenic Heights and Pipestone Creek caught my eye.  The Scenic Heights writer does a detailed item about a local cribbage tournament which was an annual event in the area, with trophies and bragging rights.  The Pipestone Creek article starts off with “Stop Press News,” which is bound to get attention, and follows with several other interesting items, including haying in January, an injunction against an enlarged school, and the annoyance of the night staff (at what one assumes was a local cafe) at having to make supper at 9:00 PM.

researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Frontier Signal ~ January 28, 1915

The Frontier Signal ~ January 28, 1915

Northern Tribune ~ January 27, 1938

Northern Tribune ~ January 27, 1938

Northern Tribune ~ January 27, 1938

Northern Tribune ~ January 27, 1938

This Week in History – Christmas Dinner

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The Crown Cafe is visible on the north side of Richmond Avenue in the 100-101 Street block (8th building from the left in this photograph, to the right of the pool hall with a peaked roof), ca. 1920.

 

I found menus for Christmas Dinner to be served in local cafes published in the paper in 1913 and 1921. Neither would be out of place in a restaurant today.

researched and written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald - December 23, 1913

Grande Prairie Herald – December 23, 1913

Crown Cafe menu

Grande Prairie Herald – December 20, 1921

This Week In 1914 – Load Up Your Sleigh and Come Along

Leaving for supplies in Edson, 1912

Leaving for supplies in Edson, 1912

Even during Christmas week practicalities were in the forefront. This large ad appeared in both the Herald and Signal newspapers this week. It seems that knowing the railroad would reach Grande Prairie in 1916, farmers were holding grain to ship by rail rather than the arduous trip over the Edson Trail. The merchants of Edson placed this ad to encourage the shipment of grain during the winter, offering immediate cash .

researched and written by Kathryn Auger

Frontier Signal - December 24, 1914

Frontier Signal – December 24, 1914

Grande Prairie Herald - December 22, 1914

Grande Prairie Herald – December 22, 1914

This Week in History – Three Christmas Traditions

Christmas on Richmond Avenue, 1966

Christmas decorations on Richmond Avenue, 1966

The December 17, 1937 front page had several articles about Christmas activities around town. “Bright Lights for Xmas” talks about the lighting downtown, and out of town shoppers having “come down in droves during the past few days.” Another has the Programme for a fairly ambitious looking Christmas Concert being performed by the children of Montrose School. Interesting that the concert was being held in the Capitol Theatre. The third item, “Decorate The Home Idea Good” must be one of the earliest home decorating contests.

I also get a kick out of the Ford version of “The Night Before Christmas” poem – indicating that advertisers even back then, were always looking for ways to tie their products into the season.

written and researched by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald - December 17, 1937

Grande Prairie Herald – December 17, 1937

Grande Prairie Herald - December 17, 1937

Grande Prairie Herald – December 17, 1937

Grande Prairie Herald - December 17, 1937

Grande Prairie Herald – December 17, 1937

Grande Prairie Herald - December 17, 1937 page 2

Grande Prairie Herald – December 17, 1937 page 2

This Week in 1914 – Ice Boat Adventure

An Ice Boat, 1980. Courtesy of Kathryn Auger.

An Ice Boat, 1980. Courtesy of Kathryn Auger

An item from the Moose Creek City Notes in the Frontier Signal of Dec. 10, 1914 describes a hair-raising boat ride on the ice of Buck Lake. Moose Creek City appears to have been another name for Emerson’s Cache Stopping Place, located about 20 km southeast of Sturgeon Lake, but it isn’t certain where Buck Lake was. No matter where it took place, it was quite a ride.

written and researched by Kathryn Auger

Frontier Signal ~ December 10, 1914

Frontier Signal ~ December 10, 1914

All Their Worldly Goods

an auction sale in Grande Prairie, 1914

an auction sale in Grande Prairie, 1914

This auction sale notice appeared in several papers, and in January 1915 the Notices to Creditors and Claimants were published in the paper.  Reading the list of goods possessed by these men would make one wonder if the proceeds would even pay for the ads.  There isn’t much information about the men, although it appears they were both homesteaders, and both were working at other jobs when they died.

written and researched by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 4, 1914

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 4, 1914

Riding the Rails

Grande Prairie train station ~ c. 1930

Grande Prairie train station ~ c. 1930

When we hear this term, we think of unemployed men hitching rides on trains during the depression.  Grande Prairie, however, had a dog who tried it.  Two weeks later, the owner is still hoping for someone to put the dog on the train home!

written and researched by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ November 29, 1935

Grande Prairie Herald ~ November 29, 1935

Ku Klux Klan Successfully Organized

J.B. Taft Stagecoach (1913) ~ Taft was one of the members of the society

J.B. Taft Stagecoach (1913) ~ Taft was one of the members of the society

Anyone looking through the old newspapers is startled by the headline on page two of the November 26, 1914 Frontier Signal: “Ku Klux Klan Successfully Organized.”  There is no direct statement of the aims of the organization, but it mentions that they worked with Temperance organizations, showed their patriotism on all occasions, and learned first aid.  There are several comments to make about this announcement.  One is that the other newspaper in town, The Herald, didn’t even report this event.  Another is that the organization was never mentioned again in the local papers.  At that time, the Klan was the proponent of a “nativist” philosophy, holding that Anglo Saxons were the apex of civilized development and that “foreigners” such as Europeans and others were to be guarded against.  1914 seems very early to have seen a Klan group organized in the north, as most information I could find talks about organizing Klan groups in the 1920s in Montreal, Ontario, British Columbia, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, and they were mainly concerned with anti-Catholic activities.  There are reports of Ku Klux Klan groups in southern Alberta working with mine owners against unions in the mines.  While the Klan may have been different then from what we understand it to be today, it still doesn’t sound like a “fraternal order” that would be an asset in town.

background information from Wikipedia and The Canadian Encyclopedia

written and researched by Kathryn Auger

Frontier Signal ~ November 26, 1914

Frontier Signal ~ November 26, 1914

 

Archives Week 2014 – Politics & Government

For Archives Week this year, we created a virtual exhibit centered around the theme of Politics & Government.  At first glance this may not seem like the most thrilling topic, but the government touches nearly every aspect of our lives and we’ve put together a collection of photographs showcasing their involvement in South Peace communities throughout the region’s history.  You can view the exhibit here.

Rapid Justice

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Richmond Avenue ~ 1940

On a Friday night in 1946, a fellow broke into two businesses in Grande Prairie.  Saturday he was in custody and sentenced, and on Monday was on the train to the Prince Albert Penitentiary.  He was well on his way to prison before the newspaper reports of the break-ins and his capture appeared on Thursday.

written and researched by Kathryn Auger

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Herald Tribune ~ November 21, 1946

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Herald Tribune – November 21, 1946