Fonds 603 1995 Grande Prairie Canada Winter Games Host Society fonds

1995 Grande Prairie Canada Winter Games Host Society fonds. — 1993-1995. — 6 cm of textual records. — 37 photographs. — 4 artistic drawings. — 4 sound recordings. — 13 video recordings.


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Agency History

The Canada Games started in February 1967 and are held every two years, alternating between summer and winter games. The 1995 Canada Winter Games were held in Grande Prairie, Alberta from February 19 to March 4, with some additional venues in Jasper. At the time, Grande Prairie was the smallest city to ever host the Games and only the second Alberta city (after Lethbridge in 1975) to do so. Twenty-one sports were featured at the games with 2517 athletes, 617 coaches and managers, 8000 volunteers, and 115 staff. The theme for the Games was “Capture the Vision”.

In January 1989, the federal government announced that the 1995 Games would be held in Alberta. Tom Thompson and George Keen started putting together a bid, enlisting the help of Games consultant Ian Howard and bid volunteers. A Site Evaluation Day was held on September 18, 1990 with representatives of the Canada Games Council and federal government visiting Grande Prairie and Jasper. On November 9, 1990, it was announced that Grande Prairie had won the bid.

The 1995 Grande Prairie Canada Winter Games Host Society incorporated as a not-for-profit organization with a mission: “We are dedicated to creating a positive climate for an unparalleled celebration of sport and culture which will leave the athlete and all those touched by their involvement in the 1995 Canada Games with a legacy rich in memories, new opportunities and pride as Canadians.”

The Host Society Board of Governors was led by Mayor Gord Graydon of Grande Prairie and was composed of the mayors, reeves, and chief executive officers of all cities, town, villages, municipalities, Indian bands, counties, and improvement districts in northwestern Alberta and northeastern BC. The Board of Governors met at least once a year to advise the Host Society on the spirit and values of the Games and to communicate between communities and Society.

The Host Society Board of Directors was also led by Mayor Gord Graydon and was composed of local and regional government representatives, education representatives, venue representatives, and Host Society Management Committee members. The Board of Directors met quarterly to support and advise the Host Society Management Committee in Games preparations and administration and to approve the Society’s capital and operating budgets.

The Host Society Management Committee was led by President H. J. (Tom) Thompson, Senior Vice President Alex Figel, and General Manager Kerry T. Moynihan. The Management Committee had fifteen divisions, each led by a vice-president: Administration/Volunteer Services (Judy Laughy), Athletes’ Village (John Webster), Culture (Carol-Lee Eckhardt), Facilities (George Keen), Finance (Fred Estlin), Friends of the ’95 Games (Bill Bowes and Turk Taylor), Health and Medical Services (Dr. Hilary Wynters), Jasper (Roger Smolnicky), Language Services (Marie Stevens), Legal Counsel (Lyle Carlstrom), Logistics (Bill McCubbin), Marketing (Wayne Jobb), Protocol and Ceremonies (Grant Menzies), Special Projects (Perky McCullough), and Sport (Rick Hryciuk). The Management Committee also included the Executive Assistant to the President (Debbie Smith), Alberta Community Development representative (Dwight Ganske), Federal Government Representative (Sandra Green), and Canada Games Council representatives and met monthly. Divisional volunteers and staff met monthly until January 1995, weekly thereafter, and daily during Games.

The Host Committee obtained $2 million each from the federal, provincial, and municipal governments. They also had additional federal support from the Department of Canadian Heritage, Human Resources Development (Unemployment Insurance Job Creation Program), Department of National Defence, Translation Bureaus, and for Canada House; additional provincial support from Environmental Protection, Public Works (Supply and Safety), Transportation and Utilities, Alberta Health, Alberta Community Development and Alberta Foundation of the Arts, and Alberta Lotteries; and additional municipal support with facilities, venues, services, and capital funding for the Canada Games Arena. Major Sponsors and Official Suppliers included Pepsi/Gray Beverages Inc., Xerox Canada, Sun Ice Ltd., Weyerhaueser, AGT Ltd., AGT Mobility, AGT Directory, County of Grande Prairie, General Motors of Canada, Air Canada, Alberta Tourism Education Council/Alberta Best, IGA, CBC/SRC, UNISYS, Daily Herald Tribune, Bowes Publishers Limited, The Calgary and Edmonton Suns, Alberta Power/Northwestern Utilities/ATCO Ltd., Canada Post, Dairy Farmers of Canada. Numerous other businesses and individuals also contributed on a smaller scale to make up a total of $3.35 million plus $3.8 million in gifts in kind.

The Canada Games Arena and Wapiti Nordic Ski Centre were constructed as venues and renovations were also made to the Johnny MacDonald Arena and Grande Prairie Regional College. A temporary Athlete’s village was also constructed.

Week One of the Games started with the February 19, 1995 Opening Ceremonies, including song and dance presentations, several addresses from dignitaries, lighting of the flame, and Colin James concert. Week One sports included Alpine Skiing (Jasper, Marmot Basin), Badminton (GPRC), Cross Country Skiing (Wapiti Nordic Ski Centre), Fencing (St. Joseph Catholic High School), Freestyle Skiing (Jasper’s Marmot Basin), Men’s Hockey (Canada Games Arena, Dave Barr Arena, Sexsmith Civic Centre, Wembley Rec-Plex), Judo (Grande Prairie Composite High School), Rhythmic Gymnastics (GPRC), Ringette (Beaverlodge Arena, Dave Barr Arena, Johnny MacDonald Arena), Shooting (Crystal Park School), Short Track Speed Skating (Johnny MacDonald Arena), Long Track Speed Skating (outside Leisure Centre Oval), and Wheelchair Basketball (Jasper Activity Centre).

Week Two sports included Artistic Gymnastics (GPRC), Biathlon (Wapiti Nordic Ski Centre), Boxing (Bowes Family Crystal Gardens), Curling (Grande Prairie Curling Rink), Figure Skating (Canada Games Arena), Women’s Hockey (Dave Barr Arena, Johnny MacDonald Arena), Squash (Grande Prairie Fitness Centre Squash Courts), Synchronized Swimming (Leisure Centre), Table Tennis (Grande Prairie Composite High School), and Weightlifting (GPRC Theatre). Week Two wrapped up with the Closing ceremonies at Canada Games Arena, including dignitaries, the Parade of Athletes, the Legend of the Northern Lights production, singer Michelle Wright, special awards, and the passing of the torch to Brandon, Manitoba as the next Host City.

Sources: http://www.canadagames.ca/content/Games/1995-Grande-Prairie.asp, http://www.canadagames2015.ca/canada-games-council, “The Best Games Ever” 1995 Canada Games Final Report (ca. 1996)

Custodial History

The records of the Cultural Division of the 1995 Grande Prairie Canada Winter Games Host Society were donated to the Archives in October 2012 by Vice President of Culture, Carol-Lee Eckhardt. The records were created primarily by Dr. Jack Wynters, Jim Nelson, and Carol-Lee Eckhardt during their work on the “Fire in the Sky” cultural performances.

Scope and Content

The fonds consists of the planning records for the 1995 Canada Winter Games, held in Grande Prairie in February-March 1995, particularly those the Cultural Division, which planned the “Fire in the Sky” cultural productions.

Notes

Table of Contents

Series 603.01Cultural Division
Series 603.01Cultural Division. — 1990, 1993-1995. — 6 cm of textual records. — 37 photographs. — 4 artistic drawings. — 4 sound recordings. — 13 video recordings.The Culture Division, one of the divisions of the Host Committee management committee, had a mandate to “showcase” local artists and those from other provinces and territories and to expose people to northern Alberta culture. The overall theme for the cultural program was “Iskoteo”, the Cree word for the Northern Lights, which were the inspiration for the theme, logo, and theme poem. Cultural division fundraisers, including the sale of buttons, the Light Up Grande Prairie Christmas light campaign (with the Grande Prairie Minor Hockey Association), and a truck raffle (with the South Peace Ball Association), we held to cover costs so that all cultural events could be provided free to the public. Funding was also obtained from Canadian Heritage’s Cultural Initiatives Program, Province of Alberta programs, and sponsors. The programs had six parts: Visual Arts, Performing Arts, Aboriginal Experience, Literary Arts, Venue Entertainment, and Holistic Arts. Other local groups, including Second Street Theatre and Grande Prairie Regional College Theatre also held cultural events during the Games. The Opening and Closing Ceremonies were not planned by the Culture Division. The Visual Arts program included the erection of “The Pinnacle” obelisk sculpture by Rudi Schmidt outside Canada Games Arena, Prairie Art Gallery shows, the “Iskoteo” juried art show at Towne Centre Mall, the Alberta Craft Council exhibit “Craft About Us”, the large Iskoteo logo in the windows of 214 Place, murals on chainlink fences by kids, the Arts and Crafts Marketplace at the Centre for Creative Arts, and the Artwalk Brochure. The Literary Arts program consisted of a contest for French and English written works and black and white drawings on the Iskoteo theme. The winning entries were published as the “Iskoteo Anthology” and given as a VIP gift. The stories were also made available to the public and the winning art entries displayed at the library. The Holistic Arts program was centred at the Holistic Centre at Queen Elizabeth II Hospital and included aromatherapy, African drum workshops, massage, and reflexology. The Performing Arts program was centred at Muskoseepi Park and had several elements, including the nightly “Fire in the Sky” program starting with the medal winners of the day in the AGT March of Champions and including a five part multi-media show presenting the history of the Peace Country from the time of the dinosaurs to the 1995 Games using video, live performers, puppets, and lasers , the “Spirit of the People” tent featuring performers from a different province or territory each night, and the “Kulture Koffee House” in the Pavilion with performances by local artists and out of province guests. Canada House also featured four hours of entertainment each day and there were live performers at each sports venue. The Aboriginal Experience featured Native, Metis, and Inuit cultures for 12 hours a day at St. Clement School, including performances and the Aboriginal Arts and Crafts Marketplace. Sources: “The Best Games Ever” 1995 Canada Games Final Report (ca. 1996)The series consists of the records of the Cultural Division of the 1995 Grande Prairie Canada Winter Games Host Committee. The records were created primarily by Dr. Jack Wynters, Jim Nelson, and Carol-Lee Eckhardt in the course of planning and producing the “Fire in the Sky” evening performances. The textual records include a few different versions of the “Fire in the Sky” episode scripts written by Jim Nelson and altered by Jack Wynters, film stock recommendations, proposals and contracts, filming arrangements, costs, and shooting schedules, puppet and character sketches, a preliminary program, site plans and maps, a project list, a schedule, a rehearsal schedule, minutes of a production meeting, publicity flyers and schedules, and correspondence regarding hot air balloons, Iskoteo and puppet design, lasers, screen, advertisers, supplies, fireworks, ampitheatre, production costs, drummers, and costumes. The scripts have been arranged by the Archivist in files by episode and chronologically by version within each file. Loose records were inserted into the “Planning Documents” file, which was roughly chronological and had its original order retained by the Archivist. Where there were separate files, ie. for “Iskoteo and Puppet Design” and “Laser”, they were maintained. The photographs include 35 contact sheet prints of the Iskoteo character and two prints of the 12 Foot Davis character. The audio-visual material includes two videos produced by Alberta Tourism and used as source material, one video of equipment tests, six videos of source material created by the Cultural Division, one video of partially completed shows, three videos of completed shows, three audio tapes of “Fire in the Sky” narrations and audio, and one audio tape of the “Capture the Vision” theme song.
Iskoteo Sketch, 1994
artwork
A sketch by Randall Fraser of the Iskoteo character for the cultural component of the 1995 Canada Winter Games.
Location: 0603.01.01
Northern Light Sky Writers Sketch, 1994
artwork
A sketch by Randall Fraser of the Northern Light Sky Writers for the cultural component of the 1995 Canada Winter Games.
Location: 0603.01.02
12′ Davis Giant Puppet Sketch, 1994
artwork
A sketch by Randall Fraser of the 12′ Davis giant puppet for the cultural component of the 1995 Canada Winter Games.
Location: 0603.01.03
Iskoteo Alternate Head Piece, [ca. 1994]
artwork
A sketch by Randall Fraser of an alternate head piece for the Iskoteo character for the cultural component of the 1995 Canada Winter Games.
Location: 0603.01.04
Iskoteo Flyer, 1995
flyer
A promotional flyer advertising and describing the Iskoteo arts program at the 1995 Canada Winter Games.
Location: 0603.01.42
12 Foot Davis, [ca. 1994]
1 photograph; colour; 8 x 10 in.
A photograph of the 12 Foot Davis character in costume at Dunvegan.
Location: 0603.01.05
12 Foot Davis, [ca. 1994]
1 photograph; colour; 4 x 6 in.
A photograph of the 12 Foot Davis character in costume at Dunvegan.
Location: 0603.01.06
Iskoteo, [ca. 1995]
35 photographs; b & w; 35 mm
Several photographs of the Iskoteo character in costume in various poses at a photography studio.
Location: 0603.01.07-.41
Alberta Tourism “Zone 8” Mighty Peace, 1990
Video Cassette
Promotional video about the Mighty Peace tourism zone of Alberta, showing scenery, attractions, and events. The Mighty Peace Zone includes Berwyn, Grimshaw, Hines Creek, Manning, Nampa, Peace River, Spirit River, Clear Hills County, County of Northern Lights, MD of Fairview, MD of Peace, MD of Spirit River, and Northern Sunrise County. Clips were used from the video in the “Fire in the Sky” shows and the video was shown in its entirety in the “Preshow”.
Location: 0603.01.44
Alberta Tourism “Zone 13” Game Country, 1990
Video Cassette
Promotional video about the Game Country tourism zone of Alberta, showing scenery, attractions, and events. The Game Country Zone included Beaverlodge, Fox Creek, Grande Prairie, Hythe, Sexsmith, Valleyview, Wembley, Whitecourt, and County of Grande Prairie, and parts of MD of Greenview, and Woodlands County. Clips were used from the video in the “Fire in the Sky” shows and the video was shown in its entirety in the “Preshow”.
Location: 0603.01.45
Tape #1 Test tape, 1994
Video Cassette
Testing of filming equipment, lighting, filters, and microphones, in preparation for filming the raw footage for the “Fire in the Sky” shows. The tests occur indoors in a couple of offices, outdoors on Richmond Avenue and Richmond Hill, and of black and white photographs.
Location: 0603.01.46
Tape #2, 1994
Video Cassette
Raw footage for the “Fire in the Sky” shows including a brief interview with Dave Biltek at his office, footage of the Canadian and Alberta flags at Superstore, polo action shots, and interviews at the polo grounds with Cled Lewis, Loretta Thompson, Curtis Crough, Ross Adam, Iyas Abbas, and Lucien Provencal.
Location: 0603.01.47
Tapes #5 and 6, 1994
Video Cassette
Raw footage for the “Fire in the Sky” shows including interviews with Ken “Baldy” Swenson, Mayor Gord Graydon, and Euphemia McNaught, a homestead woman in the Campbell Cabin, and Iskoteo material filmed in the dinosaur exhibit at the Calgary Zoo.
Location: 0603.01.48
Tapes #7 and 8, 1994
Video Cassette
Raw footage for the “Fire in the Sky” shows including homestead, Aboriginal, oilfield, and modern black and white still photographs at the Glenbow Museum and Provincial Archives of Alberta.
Location: 0603.01.49
Tape #9, October 8-9, 1994
Video Cassette
Raw footage for the “Fire in the Sky” shows including golfing, interviews with Margaret Heath, Alice Dyck, Bob Guest, Greg Ross, Emma Wynters Eckhardt, Nigell Carrell, and Alex Houssein, and various mascots at the Muskoseepi Pavilion, Jubilee Park, the Courthouse, Richmond Avenue, the Airport, and on Richmond Hill.
Location: 0603.01.50
Tape #10, October 10-11, 1994
Video Cassette
Raw footage for the “Fire in the Sky” shows including mascots at the Prairie Mall, an interview with Victor Doucette, Iskoteo shots at Simonette and helicopter aerial footage, and Carol-Lee Eckhardt.
Location: 0603.01.51
Shows 3-5 Intermediate Version, [ca. 1995]
Video Cassette
An intermediate version of the “Fire in the Sky” shows 3, 4, and 5 including some music, dialogue, and editing directions, but lacking some of the show elements. Show 3 includes scenes of 12 Foot Davis at Dunvegan, bison, an interview with Margaret Heath and Tom Kerr photographs, river scenery, homesteading scenes, and interviews likely taken from the “People of the Peace” NFB movie and other sources, still photographs of homesteaders from the Glenbow and Provincial Archives of Alberta, the homestead wife footage filmed at the Campbell Cabin, and the standard Iskoteo northern lights, sunspots, solar wind ending taken from “The Northern Lights” NFB movie. Show 4 includes scenes of the Mascot Mardi Gras occuring in various locations around Grande Prairie, modern footage of Grande Prairie, interviews with Kenneth “Baldy” Swenson, Alex Houssein, Dave Biltek, Gord Graydon, Greg Ross, Emma Wynters Eckhardt, Nigell Carrell, Marie Stevens, Arcie Calliou, Darlene Repka Smith, Loretta Thompson, Curtis Crough, Lucien Provencal, Cled Lewis, Iyas Abbas, and Bob Guest, golf and polo action shots, footage taken from tourism movies, “People of the Peace,” and other sources, and the standard Iskoteo ending. Show 5 includes brief scenes of dinosaurs, prehistoric creatures, and Iskoteo, still photographs of Aboriginals and homesteaders, and footage taken from “People of the Peace” and other sources. The show appears to be incomplete.
Location: 0603.01.52
Preshow, February 16, 1995
Video Cassette
The final version of the “Fire in the Sky” preshow, including the Alberta Tourism “Zone 13” Mighty Peace and “Zone 8” Game Country videos, sports footage of honourary chairpersons Kerrin Lee-Gartner and Alexandre Daigle, “The Pinnacle” obelisk being assembled outside the Canada Games Arena, clips from the “Snowbirds” NFB movie, “It’s Snow” NFB movie, clips from the 1992 Canada Games retrospective movie, Captain Tractor “Logdriver’s Waltz” music video, “Matrioska” NFB movie, commercials for AGT, Northwestern Utilities, Superlube, Chevrolet Cavalier, Pontiac Sunfire, PTI Group, Superchannel, Dragon Palace, Wendy’s, Modern Decore, Woodland Do It Centre, IGA, Westair Aviation, Robin’s Donuts, Weyerhaeuser, Chevrolet Blazer, The Brick, Courtesy Corner (Rycroft), JD Automotive, Husky House, Air BC, Bud Laverick (Remax), BJ’s Cue Club and Sports Bar, Northern Metalic, GMC Jimmy, Create-a-Portrait, One Hour Photo Source, Subway, Grande Prairie Inn Triples Club, and KFC, and credits for the Cultural Division, sponsors, “Iskoteo” supporters, and “Fire in the Sky” performers, interviewees, and production crew.
Location: 0603.01.53
Show 1, February 3, 1995
Video Cassette
The final version of the “Fire in the Sky” show 1 with background music and narration, including Roy Bickell giving a welcome from AGT, northern lights, sunspots, and solar wind clips from “The Northern Lights” NFB movie, the Iskoteo landing sequence with Randall Fraser playing Iskoteo, Canada Flag footage, prehistoric and dinosaur life clips from a variety of films integrated with Calgary Zoo footage of Iskoteo, clips from Alberta Tourism video and “People of the Peace” NFB movie, the standard Iskoteo ending, Roy Bickell welcoming everyone to the March of Champions, and credits.
Location: 0603.01.54
Show 2, February 3, 1995
Video Cassette
The final version of the “Fire in the Sky” show 2 with background music and narration, including Roy Bickell giving a welcome from AGT, northern lights, sunspots, and solar wind clips from “The Northern Lights” NFB movie, the Iskoteo landing sequence with Randall Fraser playing Iskoteo, Canada Flag footage, land scape footage, Aboriginal still photographs from the Glenbow and Provincial Archives of Alberta, clips from the “People of the Peace” NFB movie, Alberta Tourism movies, and other sources, interviews with Archie Calliou, Samson Redhead, Bonnie Bell, and Patrick Heavenfire, the standard Iskoteo ending, Roy Bickell welcoming everyone to the March of Champions, and credits.
Location: 0603.01.55
End Credit Shots Fire in the Sky, [ca. 1994]
Video Cassette
According to the label on the tape, it includes footage of Culture Division staff and volunteers and two photographs for use in the end credits of the “Fire in the Sky” shows. Another note states that “This footage was shot on an 8mm/240 line instrument. (Not shot with Hi-8 camera.”
Location: 0603.01.56
Narration Master, [ca. 1995]
Audio Cassette
According to the label on the tape, it is the Narration Master for the “Fire in the Sky” shows.
Location: 0603.01.57
Fire in the Sky 1, [ca. 1995]
Audio Cassette
According to the label on the tape, it is includes audio for the “Fire in the Sky” shows.
Location: 0603.01.58
Fire in the Sky 2, [ca. 1995]
Audio Cassette
According to the label on the tape, it is includes audio for the “Fire in the Sky” shows.
Location: 0603.01.59
Capture the Vision, [ca. 1995]
Audio Cassette
A recording of the “Capture the Vision” theme song for the 1995 Canada Winter Games. The song was written by John Shields and may have been sung by Jessica Schultz.
Location: 0603.01.60
Iskoteo Newspaper, 1995
newspaper
Two copies of a promotional newspaper advertising and describing the Iskoteo arts program at the 1995 Canada Winter Games. The paper was edited by Carol-Lee Eckhardt, written by Jody Farrell, designed by Trina Irons, and printed by the Daily Herald Tribune.
Location: 0603.01.43
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