Fonds 063 Grande Prairie School Division No. 14

fonds-063

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Grande Prairie School Division No. 14. — 1921-1981. — 436.5 cm of textual records. — 178 photographs. — 76 blueprints.


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Agency History

Grande Prairie School Division No. 14 was created through an Order in Council of the Provincial Government on October 16, 1937. The school division represented the provincial Department of Education through the school inspectors, who had formerly been in charge of overseeing the teachers and school district boards. Individual school district boards were replaced by trustees who carried on the day-to-day operation of the school. At the first meeting on January 4, 1938, board members of the new school division were served with a statement of claim seeking to prevent them from doing board business. The resulting meeting lasted two days, during which the injunction was defeated, a secretary-treasurer hired, offices set up in the Court House, and decisions made on consistent contracts for cleaning, heating and supplying the country schools with water. School Division 14 was the school authority until January 1951, when the County of Grande Prairie was formed and assumed administration of the schools within the County.

Custodial History

Records were passed on to the County of Grande Prairie No. 1, who deposited them on loan in the Provincial Archives in 1970, 1991, and 1995. The records were transferred to the Grande Prairie Regional Archival by permanent donation in 2000. An accrual consisting of the minutes of the Divisional Board (1943-44) was transferred by the County of Grande Prairie in 2013.

Scope and Content

The fonds consists of the minutes and accounts of the Grande Prairie School Division No. 14 from its inception in 1938 until its integration into the County; policy statements and attendance policies; financial statements; and correspondence between the School Division and teachers, trustees and the Department of education. It includes reports and correspondence of the school inspectors prior to the creation of the division. Common documentation in these files include letters regarding formation of school districts; land documents for the school site; letters and petitions from concerned parents regarding location, provision or instruction; census lists and class reports; applications and letters from teachers; Department of Education Inspector’s reports; orders for supplies and books; blueprints of schools, teacherages and barns; and building inspection reports. An unidentified barn blueprint and cost sheet is labeled general School Division Records (063.02). Also included in many of the files are photographs of the school buildings taken in the mid 1950s during the time of consolidation, when many of the buildings were being sold or left vacant. These are record shots, and the quality of the photographs is not consistent. As each school was sold, letters regarding the sale of the property were added to the file. Files of correspondence are for the following schools in the County of Grande Prairie: Aldergrove, Annellen, Appleton, Ashdown, Aspen Dale, Aspen Ridge, Bad Heart, Baldur, Beaverbrook, Beaverlodge, Beaverlodge Separate School, Bezanson, Big Horn, Blooming Valley, Bridge Creek, Buffalo Lake, Crystal Creek, Currie, East Kleskun, Elmworth, Equity, Fitzsimmons, Five Mile Creek, Flying Shot Lake, Gimle, Glass Lake, Goodfare, Grande Prairie Association for Retarded Children, Grande Prairie, Grovedale, Halcourt, Harry Balfour, Haven, Hayfield, Hermit Lake, Hythe, Independent Valley, Itipaw, Kemble, Kleskun Hill, Kleskun Lake, Lower Beaverlodge, Luckey Tree, Klondyke, LaGlace, Lambert, Lindsay, Many Springs, McHenry, Meadowville, Millarston, Molde, Morningview, Mountain Side, Mountain Trail, Mount Saskatoon, North Beaverlodge, North Equity, North Kleskun, North Sexsmith, Odin, Old Post, Pendleton, Percy, Pipestone Creek, Preston Lake, Ravenswood, Ray Lake, Rio Grande, Riversvale, Rivertop, Royal Banner, Saskatoon Lake, St. John’s Lutheran, Sexsmith, Sexsmith Separate, Sinclair Lake, Somme, South Bad Heart, South Wapiti, Southwell, Steeprock, Sylvester, Teepee Creek, Torun, Tranquility, Twilight, Two Rivers, Valhalla, Wapiti, Webster Trail, Wellington, Wembley, West End and West Hythe.

Notes

Title based on the contents of the fonds.
Related Records: fonds 065-104, 576-584 records of individual school boards collected by Grande Prairie School Division No. 14; fonds 059, Phyllis Stewart Collection; County of Grande Prairie Administration sous-fonds 301 (Board of Education Minutes, 1951-1994).
Some files are restricted because they contain personal information.

Table of Contents

Series 063.01Minutes series
Series 063.02Correspondence series
Series 063.03Financial Records series
Series 063.01Minutes series. — 1938-1949. — 13.5 cm of textual records.The series consists of the minutes and accounts of the Grande Prairie School Division No. 14 from its inception in 1938 until its function is taken over by the County of Grande Prairie School Committee in 1951. There is also some information on attendance policies and correspondence regarding the same.
Series 063.02Correspondence series. — 1920-1981. — 422 cm of textual records. — 178 photographs. — 76 maps.The series consists of correspondence between the School Division and teachers, trustees and the Department of education. It includes reports and correspondence of the school inspectors prior to the creation of the division and correspondence with the County after the division was included in County administration. Common documentation in these files include letters regarding formation of school districts; land documents for the school site; letters and petitions from concerned parents regarding location, provision or instruction; census lists and class reports; applications and letters from teachers; Department of Education Inspector’s reports; orders for supplies and books; blueprints of schools, teacherages and barns; and building inspection reports. An unidentified barn blueprint and cost sheet is labeled general School Division Records (063.02). Also included in many of the files are photographs of the school buildings taken in the mid 1950s during the time of consolidation, when many of the buildings were being sold or left vacant. These are record shots, and the quality of the photographs is not consistent. As each school was sold, letters regarding the sale of the property were added to the file.
SubSeries 063.02.001General Correspondence. — [ca. 1920-1955]. — 1 cm of textual records. — 2 blueprints.The sub-series consists of a file of miscellaneous documents including a teacher’s timetable for a one-room school in the 1940s, a list of materials needed to build a school barn, a ca. 1955 list of the schools with their outbuildings and the value placed on each one, and some general forms and specifications.
 
Teacher’s Timetable, [1940]
document
A teacher’s time table from a one-room school listing the grades and subjects taught. The table in drawn in black and red and shows the teacher’s focus changing every 10 minutes as she switches between Divisions One (Grade 1-2), Two (Grade 4-6) and Three (Grade 8-9). Every day he/she teaches Arithmetic, Mathematics, Language, Literature, Social Studies, English, Art, Health, Choral Speech, Writing, Science, Community Economics, Dramatics and Enterprise.
Location: 0063.02.001.01
 
Plan of Proposed Barn, 1930 c.
blueprint
two plans, one of the floor and one of the elevations; cost sheet for barn.
Location: 0063.02.001a-b
SubSeries 063.02.002Aldergrove School District 4574. — 1930-1953. — 1 cm of textual records. — 1 blueprints.Aldergrove School opened on March 20, 1933, a year after the organization of the school district. Located on the S.W. corner of 17074-12 W6, the school was a 26 x 32 log and frame building with a 10 x 20 lean-to. Sophie Knudtson (Mrs. Gerlinger) was the first teacher, followed by Mary Akre (Mrs. A. Gibson), and Ethel Meyer. In the fall of 1937, owing to a lack of children in the district, the school closed permanently and the pupils were sent to neighbouring schools.Sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education.
 
Low-Cost Frame School Plan for Pioneer and New Districts, 1938
blueprint
Plans, elevations, details for walls, doors, windows, blackboards, partitions, cupboards.
Location: 0063.02.002.1
SubSeries 063.02.003Annellen School District 4111. — 1931-1957. — 2 cm of textual records. — 1 blueprints.Annellen School District No. 4111 was originally taught in the home of Ray Holland in 1922. A log school building was then constructed on the corner of Reg Symington’s homestead in 1923. The log school house was replaced in 1943 with a frame building which was used until 1952 when the children were bussed to school in Hythe. Annellen School was named after Anne and Ellen McPherson. Some of the teachers who were hired over the years to teach at Annellen School were W.A. Brown, John Rule, Jack Tracey, Gladys Kennedy, Betty Womsley, Catherine Alt, Gertie Brightwell, William Lay, Inga Maricle, Stanley Roberts, Margaret Platts, Beatrice MacAuley, and Mrs Schumaker.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school board, teachers, parents and the school division; and building specifications for the new school built in 1942. The blueprint is a Standard Government of Alberta, Department of Education low-cost frame school plan for pioneer and new districts.
SubSeries 063.02.004Appleton School District 2818. — 1930-1948. — 1 cm of textual records. — 1 blueprints.Appleton School District was located in the Beaverlodge Valley on the east side of the river. The first log school was built in 1913; Jim Cory of Halcourt was the builder, aided by volunteers. John Appel, a local homesteader, advanced the necessary money to complete the building and the school was named Appleton in his honour. Miss Margaret MacNaught was the first teacher, followed by Daisy Dixon, Newton Grimmett, Alberta Elcome, Judd Perry, Euphemia MacNaught and Jean O’Brien. In 1921 the school was moved two miles to the northwest. There a stable and ice house were built and a well was drilled. The school was also used for church services and as a facility for the Community Club. In 1941, a lumber building replaced the old log school. Appleton School closed under consolidation during the 1940s.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education. The blueprint is for a closed porch on a low-cost frame school.
 
Closed Porch for Low-Cost Frame School, 1941
blueprint
Plan and south, west and north elevations.
Location: 0063.02.004.1
SubSeries 063.02.005Ashdown School District 4504. — 1929-1959. — 4 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Ashdown School District #4504 was formed by residents of the Homestead District near Hythe in 1930. The district had no funds and could not apply for debentures because they lived mostly on unimproved land. Therefore, they decided to build a log school by volunteer labour. The school opened October 5, 1931 with Ferne Horte as teacher. Soon the volunteers were back building the barn. Teachers at Ashdown School included L. Phillips, P. Melrose, and P. Cranshaw. Ashdown School closed under consolidation in the 1950s.The sub-series consists of attendence records, building accounts, and correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. The photographs are of Ashdown School and the barn and outhouses.
 
Ashdown School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Ashdown school house (district #4504), situated near Hythe, was formed in 1930.
Location: 0063.02.005.1
SubSeries 063.02.006Aspen Dale School District 4792. — 1940-1963. — 2 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.In 1937, the western portion of Aspen Ridge School District and land to the south and west were combined into a new school district—Aspen Dale School District #4792. The old Aspen Ridge school was moved onto a new concrete foundation on the new Aspen Dale site, NE 21-70-9 W6, and the school opened in the fall of 1938. At some point a teacherage and a barn were added to the site. Teachers at the Aspen Dale school included Martha (Hennig) Gitzel, Violet Evans, Hillis Stratton, Mrs. W.H. Young, Miss B. M. Juneau, Florence Russell, Mrs. J. Smith, Annie Chugg, Elvira Wiens, P.J. Moynihan, Lorena McLaughlin, Phyllis Larson, Erika Scheerschmidt. Under centralization, the school was closed in September 1958 and students were bussed to Wembley. The school house remained in use as a community center until 1979.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school trustees, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. The photographs are of the school, teacherage, and the barn in 1958.
 
Aspendale School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Aspendale school house (district #4792) was opened in 1938 by combining the western portion of Aspen Ridge School District with land to the south and west. The old Aspen Ridge school was moved to the new Aspendale site, NE 21-70-9 W6.
Location: 0063.02.006.1
Aspendale Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Aspendale school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.006.2
Aspendale Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Aspendale school property.
Location: 0063.02.006.3
SubSeries 063.02.007Aspen Ridge School District 4348. — 1929-1962. — 5 cm of textual records. — 4 photographs.Aspen Ridge School first opened in 1928 and closed on June 30, 1957. The school was located on the north west corner of SW 24-70-9-W6. The first teacher, Miss Broadbridge, was followed by Winona Howell, Martha Hennig, Joe Montgomery, Mrs. Crouse, Miss Annie Walker and Elbridge E. Green. In September of 1938, the old school district of Aspen Ridge split into Aspen Ridge on the east and Aspen Dale on the west. Aspen Ridge retained its original district number but got a new school house and a new location at SE 29-70-8-W6. When the new Aspen Ridge school opened in 1938, Elbridge Green was the teacher followed by A.E. McCready, Ingibjorg Jakobson (Olsson), Laura Bohme, Mary Funnell, Blanche Regimbald, Nora Giesbrect, Albine Sawchuk, Audrey Sutherland and Florence Nail. Mrs. Rose and Mrs. I. Smith taught for the final year. Aspen Ridge closed c. 1957.The sub-series consists of school reports and correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. Photographs are of the school, the teacherage, the barn, and the toilet facilities.
 
Aspen Ridge School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Aspen Ridge school house (district #4348) was built in 1928 at northwest courner of SW 24-70-9 W6.
Location: 0063.02.007.1
Aspen Ridge Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Aspen Ridge school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.007.2
New Aspen Ridge School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Aspen Ridge school house (district #4348) on its new location at SE of 29-70-8 W6.
Location: 0063.02.007.3
Aspen Ridge Outbuildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
An outhouse and a barn on the Aspen Ridge school property.
Location: 0063.02.007.4
SubSeries 063.02.008Bad Heart School District 4369. — 1929-1960. — 3 cm of textual records.Bad Heart School District #4369 was established in 1928, and in 1930, $500 was borrowed to build a new school and barn of logs. In 1948 the school burned to the ground, and because of the size of the district, it was decided to build two new schools: North & South Bad Heart. Teachers included Florence Mae Foster, E. Pearl Grimmeth, Mrs. Janet Jenkins, Mary Looker, Miss Sheets, Bill Wight, Merle Hillerud, Olive Simmons, Frank Taves, Florence Reimer, Glen Dixon, Mr. Atkinson, Mr. Horrick.The sub-series consists of school reports and correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.009Baldur School District 4349. — 1929-1956. — 4 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Baldur School operated for 10 years in the Poplar Hill area of Hythe, not far from Bush Lake. It was named after a hero in Norse Mythology, as were the nearby districts of Valhalla and Odin. The first organizational meeting was in 1928, and the school was started that fall by volunteer labour. By Christmas of 1929, the school was ready and a teacher was hired, Mary Lewis. Through the depression which followed, the community struggled to keep the school open and teachers hired. Two of the earliest teachers were Agnes Loberg and Alice Stolee.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. Two photographs taken in the 1950s are of the school and barn.
 
Baldur School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Baldur school house (district #4349) was situated in the Poplar Hill Area of Hythe and was named after a hero in Norse mythology
Location: 0063.02.009.1
SubSeries 063.02.010Beaverbrook School District 3979. — 1928-1962. — 3 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Beaverbrook School was in the Hazelmere District, which was settled in the late 20s and extended westward towards Stony Lake and Monkman Pass. Some of the teachers throughout the years inlcude Newton Grimmett, Rachal Labatt, Edward Rockarts, Ella Holtz, Dorothy Solomonson, Olive Simmons, Hazel Coogan, Elnora Barker, and Doris Dalgleish. The new Beaverbrook School was built in 1948, replacing the log school building. The plan was to move the Beaverbrook school to Elmworth eventually, however, the school building was sold in 1962. In 1952, Beaverbrook was closed and the district became amalgamated with Elmworth School District.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education. The photographs are of the log school and log barn, c. 1950.
 
Beaverbrook School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Beaverbrook school house (district #3979), in the Hazelmere District, closed in 1948.
Location: 0063.02.010.1
Beaverbrook Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Beaverbrook school barn with the school house in the background.
Location: 0063.02.010.2
SubSeries 063.02.011Beaverlodge Separate School District 68. — 1957-1962. — 0.5 cm of textual records.St. Mary’s, Beaverlodge Separate School, was organized in 1957 under the leadership of Father T.P. Murphy, Jim Nasedkin and Dr. G.L. McMurray. The school consisted of four and one-half classrooms and was built largely by volunteer labour. It opened for the 1958-59 school year with Sisters of the Holy Cross from Grande Prairie as teachers. By the next fall, a Convent had been built and St. Mary’s could hire and house its own staff. The first resident staff were Sister Mary Agnes (principal), Maria Goretti and Mary Patricia, teachers, and Sister Mary Bridgida as cook and housekeeper.The sub-series consists of correspondence between Grande Prairie School Division No. 14 and Beaverlodge Separate School.
SubSeries 063.02.012Beaverlodge School District 2341. — 1929-1970. — 57 cm of textual records. — 4 photographs. — 29 blueprints.Beaverlodge School District No. 2341 was formed in the spring of 1910, the first public school in the Grande Prairie District. The school was built of logs and located at the old townsite. Even the desks were hand-made. The first teacher was Mrs. C.A. Drake (Mrs. J.W. Wilkie), followed by Elizabeth Johnson. In 1922, a two-room frame school was built, and by 1929 there was also a new two-room, brick-faced school at the new townsite. These three schools served the population (with overflow classes in the Victory Hall, the Community Centre and Bentum Hall) until centralization, when two new schools—elementary and high school–were built.The sub-series consists of correspondence files containing inspectors’ reports; communications from board members, teachers, parents, the school district; census forms; and building records. Blueprints, dating from 1959 to 1969, include town plans, landscaping plans and blueprints for building and additions. Three photographs are of the elementary school and two sheds on the school property c. 1950. One photo, also c. 1950, is of the old Beaverlodge High School built in 1929.
 
Beaverlodge Elementary School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
Beaverlodge Elementary School (district #2341).
Location: 0063.02.012.1
Beaverlodge School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Beaverlodge school property.
Location: 0063.02.012.2
Beaverlodge School Shed, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A shed located on the Beaverlodge school property.
Location: 0063.02.012.3
 
Proposed Addition to Beaverlodge High School, c.1968
blueprint
copy of detailed blueprint
Location: 0063.02.012.01
Proposed Addition and Alterations at Beaverlodge Elementary School, 1966
blueprint
includes 1951 building, 1956 addition and proposed addition
Location: 0063.02.012.02
Proposed Addition and Alterations at Beaverlodge Elementary School, 1966
blueprint
ground floor plan–includes 1951 building, 1956 addition and proposed addition
Location: 0063.02.012.03
Proposed Addition and Alterations at Beaverlodge Elementary School, 1966
blueprint
sketch plan and front elevation
Location: 0063.02.012.04
Proposed Addition and Alterations at Beaverlodge Elementary School, 1967
blueprint
footing & foundation plan; roof structure
Location: 0063.02.012.05
Beaverlodge School, 1960-1969
blueprints
various plans for entire building, wall and window details, and landscaping
Location: 0063.02.012.06-7, 12
Sample Blueprints, 1960
blueprints
DEACCESSIONED – Milk River School in Warner Alberta
Location: 0063.02.012.08-.11, 15-.17
Sketch Plan Proposed High School Beaverlodge, 1960
plan
Sketch plan of proposed Beaverlodge School.
Location: 0063.02.012.13
Town of Beaverlodge, 1960
town plan
showing location of Beaverlodge School
Location: 0063.02.012.14
Proposed High School, Beaverlodge, 1960
diazo plan
Diazo plan for proposed high school in Beaverlodge.
Location: 0063.02.012.18
Sketch Plan No. 2 – Addition to Beaverlodge High School, 1961
plan
Sketch Plan No. 2 showing addition to Beaverlodge High School.
Location: 0063.02.012.19
Proposed Landscaping for School at Beaverlodge, [ca. 1962]
plan
Plan showing proposed landscaping for school at Beaverlodge.
Location: 0063.02.012.22
Beaverlodge High School Detail, 1963
diazo plan
Diazo plan of Beaverlodge High School detail.
Location: 0063.02.012.23-25
Proposed Additions and Alterations to Beaverlodge High School, 1963
diazo plan
Diazo plan showing proposed additions and alterations to Beaverlodge High School.
Location: 0063.02.012.26
Town of Beaverlodge, 1966
town plan
Plan showing subdivision of part of lot 2, Blk. 4A & Pt. Of 2nd Ave.–Plan 6156 K.S.
Location: 0063.02.012.27
Beaverlodge School, 1960-1969
plans
various plans for entire building, wall and window details, and landscaping
Location: 0063.02.012.28-29
SubSeries 063.02.013Bezanson School District 3302. — 1930-1952. — 2 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.The Bezanson School District #3302 was organized in 1915 and school held in the Presbyterian log church at the top of the Smoky River hill above the townsite, starting in 1916. Miss Ida Colby was the first teacher. In 1919, a lumber school was built and named after A.M. Bezanson. The first teacher in the new school was Mrs. Todd. She was followed by Mae Bolonger and Mrs. Ida (Colby) Dewhirst. In 1925 the school was moved to NW 25-71-3 W6th. Mae Traynor, Martha Gudlaugson, Dorothy Goodland, Betty Willets, Lillian Hicks, Nancy French, Lucy Bonella, Gertie Clarkson, Hilda Muttart, Alma Ulmer, Beatrice Moir, Martha Knechtel, K.F. Philip, Laura Berg, Grace Ferris, Ruth Gibson, Lucy Jones, Margaret McNaught, Marion Muzyka, Marion Burgess, Jean McLaughlin, Phyllis Mattoon, Mary Tomshak, Allen Thronson, Vera Spence and Marie Ames were the teachers in this school. In 1950-51, teachers were difficult to obtain for small country schools so children did correspondence lessons under supervision. By this time, a new school had been built in the village of Bezanson, so some children transferred there. At the end of June 1951, the school was closed and the building sold and moved to Bezanson village, where it burned down a few years later.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education and photographs.
 
Bezanson School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Bezanson school house (district #3302) was built in 1919.
Location: 0063.02.013.1
Bezanson School Outbuilding, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A building on the Bezanson school property.
Location: 0063.02.013.2
SubSeries 063.02.014Bezanson School District 3898. — 1955-1970. — 12 cm of textual records. — 9 blueprints.In 1950 five school districts had amalgamated under the title of Lindsay School District 3898: Somme, Bezanson, Lindsay, East Kleskun and Fitzsimmons. Bezanson Consolidated was formed in 1955, when Lindsay School District 3898 was renamed Bezanson School District 3898. That same year, a modern teacherage was built to house the teachers, for whom accomodations were hard to find. Since the expense of the teacherage did not fit into the County budget, local farmers donated the labour and the county supplied the materials. As a result of consolidation, a new four-roomed school was built and opened in 1957.The sub-series consists of school reports and correspondence between the school division, teachers, parents and trustees. The blueprints are for a 1955 teacherage, the 1960 school addition, and the proposed water supply for Bezanson School. The photographs are of the school, teacherage and barn c. 1958. List of Electors from the 1960 Federal Election is included.
 
The Sparling Teachers Residence, 1955
blueprint
basement and ground floor plans
Location: 0063.02.014.1
The Sparling Teachers Residence, 1955
blueprint
Cross-section and front Elevation
Location: 0063.02.014.2
The Sparling Teachers Residence, 1955
blueprint
Lot plan and side, rear and Alternative Elevations
Location: 0063.02.014.3
Proposed addition to Existing School at Bezanson, 1960
blueprint
Scheme 1, Proposed Floor Plan
Location: 0063.02.014.4
Proposed addition to Existing School at Bezanson, 1960
blueprint
Scheme 2, Proposed Floor Plan
Location: 0063.02.014.5
Addition to Existing School at Bezanson, 1960
blueprint
Drawing W-2, Main Floor Plan
Location: 0063.02.014.6
Addition to Existing School at Bezanson, 1960
blueprint
Drawing W-3, Elevations (North, South, East, West)
Location: 0063.02.014.7
Proposed Water Supply Bezanson School, 1962
blueprint
Plan water supply to school
Location: 0063.02.014.8a
Proposed Water Supply Bezanson School, 1962
blueprint
Plan water supply to school
Location: 0063.02.014.8b
SubSeries 063.02.015Big Horn School District 3312. — 1929-1957. — 2 cm of textual records. — 1 photographs.The Big Horn School District was established in 1916, but by then the school had been in operation for two years, first in the Methodist Church on SE 16-73-8 W6th , and after it burned down in 1917, in various homes around the district. The school was built in 1920. The first teacher was Emery Keith. Later teachers were Miss McLelland, Miss Ruffe, Mrs. Wagar, Miss Crawley, Mrs. Heiken, Miss Waltan, Leo Patterson, Miss Chamber, Mrs. Bittorff, Mrs. George Lowe, Mrs. Garner, Miss Reid, Mr. Howlett, Miss Mackey, Lillian Lowe, Miss Halwa, Bert Harrison, Maisie Carter, Mabel White, Eileen Morrison, Gladys Scottsvold, and Mrs. Wood. Big Horn School closed in favour of the County System c. 1950.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. The single photograph is of the school after it was sold in 1954.
 
Big Horn School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Big Horn school house (district #3312) was built in 1920 and closed around 1950 in favour of the County System.
Location: 0063.02.015.1
SubSeries 063.02.016Blooming Valley School District 3912. — 1931-1954. — 2 cm of textual records. — 1 photographs.Blooming Valley School opened in 1920, in a vacant bachelor shack, with Talbert Ronning from Valhalla as the first teacher. The school house was built in 1921 on SW 3-75-9 W6 through community effort. Mrs. Mills was the first teacher in the new school. Later a barn was added to the property. At its height, there were 24 children at Blooming Valley School, but by 1953, only 6 children were on the roll. The school was closed and the students bussed to Valhalla. Teachers at Blooming Valley included Ada Fuller, Jessie Erskine, Dorothy Peck, Ardys Allan, Florence Smith, Myrtle Johnson, Anne Hrehircheck, Vera Ruptash, Cora Ventress, Ruby Fredrickson, Judith Erickson, Alice Pfau, Ralph Cook, Rae Dolemo, Belle Stewart Wallace and Vera Severson.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. The single photograph was taken after the white-framed school had been vacant for one year.
 
Blooming Valley, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Blooming Valley school house (district #3912) was built through community effort in 1921 on SW 3-75-9 W6. At its height, the student population was up to 24, but droped to 6 in 1953 and the school was closed. The students were bussed to Valhalla to continue their schooling.
Location: 0063.02.016.1
SubSeries 063.02.017Bridge Creek School District 4984. — 1953. — 1 cm of textual records.In 1950, the families at Bridge Creek requested their own school for 20 children who, up till this time were traveling to Grovedale School over unimproved roads. Bridge Creek School District was organized, and in September 1951 the school opened. At first, only supervisors were available to oversee the lessons: Ethel Hawkes, Shirley Penson, Margaret Courtney (who died in a fire which destroyed the teacherage), Mike Senciw. Teachers included Rita McGhan, Cal Salmon, Mrs. Frank Lockwood, Mr. Gerry, and Mrs. D. Watt. In 1961 the school was closed and bussing provided to Grovedale.The sub-series consists of two Workbook orders for two undated years, one when the expected enrollment was 18, the other when the expected enrollment was 24.
SubSeries 063.02.018Buffalo Lake School District 3144. — 1932; 1940-1950. — 2 cm of textual records. — 1 photographs.Buffalo Lake School District was first organized in 1914 but not acted upon for the next few years. The first Buffalo Lake School was built in 1918, and school was started that fall. Except for a period from June 1925 – February 1927 when there was no school, this building served the community until 1929, when a new school was built. Teachers included Mrs. George Wilson, Miss C. Smith (Mrs. L. Heiken), Miss Bohn, Miss Alice Sutherland, Miss M. Quail, Miss Della Finlay, Miss Lila MacDiarmid, Miss Mary McDonald, Mrs. Bessant, Mrs. Russell, Miss J. Hutson, and Mrs. Della Maple. Miss Clarice Wold, Miss S. Sutherland and Miss Pfau served as supervisors when teachers were not available. The new school was built in 1929 by Olaf Bue and Andrew Oilund on the same site, the old school then becoming the stable. Children from Manysprings School District also attended Buffalo Lake School District while waiting for their school to be built. The last year the school operated was 1948, and then in 1949 the school building was moved to LaGlace.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education.
 
Pipestone Creek Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The original Pipestone Creek School became the teacherage in 1952. The Old Buffalo Lakes School which was brought down to become the Pipestone Creek School after 1952, can be partly seen on the right side of the photograph.
Location: 0063.02.018.1
SubSeries 063.02.019Canor School District 3955. — 1929-1949; 1963. — 2.5 cm of textual records.Canor (Canadian-Norwegian) School was organized c. 1920, and school taught for a few months in a vacant house. From 1920-1928 the students attended Chatham until a school was built in the Canor District. They travelled to Chatham in a school van, a covered sleigh. In 1928, the school was constructed by Ed Loven and Mr. Powell. Teachers included Miss B. Hallet (Mrs. J.C. Lawrence), Miss Benson, Miss Comfort, Daisey Albers, Miss Willis, Miss E. Cochrane, Miss M. Poppin, Mr. T.E. Shannon, Miss Pow, Harriet Wallace, Miss O. Prevost, Miss L. Burton, Phyllis Clarke, Mrs. Tinchuk, Mary Sereda, Miss R. Roberts, Miss D. Longson, Ethel Hoflin, and Irene Samuelson. Teachers boarded at C. Christensen’s until Mr. Shannon [1935]. All the teachers from Miss Pow on boarded at Olga Christensen. Canor School operated until 1949, when the one-room schools in the area were consolidated to Sexsmith and LaGlace. There was no teacherage at Canor.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.020Canuck School District 3873. — 1930-1965. — 2 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.The Canuck School District was located south-west of Sexsmith. It was built in 1921, but classes were first held in a log building on Walter McGervins’ homestead as early as 1918. Teachers included Leo Patterson, Miss Nugent, Peggy Stanford, Mrs. Clendenan, Dora Coburg, May Robinson, Mr. Strawn, Myrtle Dixon, Alice Sutherland, Myrtle Tolley, Marjorie Clifford, Florence Cunningham, Patsy Meraw, Mrs. R. Bennett, Betty Rigby, Alice Samuelson, Norah Webb, Roy Grimsrud, Barbara Bailey, Eleanor Wafler, Velma Podulsky, Pat Van Schaick, Florence Nail and Mrs. (Myrtle) Jack Brown. The school was closed ca. 1955.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department . The photographs are of a cottage-roofed white frame school with two porches, a teacherage and a frame barn.
 
Canuck School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Canuck school house (district #3873), located south-west of Sexsmith, was built in 1921 and closed around 1955.
Location: 0063.02.020.1
Canuck Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Canuck school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.020.2
Canuck School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Canuck school property.
Location: 0063.02.020.3
SubSeries 063.02.021Caribou School District 3573. — 1929-1954. — 3 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Classes in the Caribou School District were first held in a home next to the Red Willow River. By 1928, a school had been built on John Sheppard’s homestead, uniquely finished with Russian plaster. Teachers at Caribou included Clarence Rockarts, Mr. Sketchly, Helen Webb, Roy Berlet, Elnora Solomanson, Dinah White, and Frank Bullis. The school only closed down when students began to be bussed to Halcourt in the mid 1950s.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. The photographs, taken in the late 50s, are of the abandoned school, a long shed and the outhouse.
SubSeries 063.02.022Chatham School District 3638. — 1931-1946. — 1 cm of textual records.Chatham School District was formed in 1916, and for the first few years was taught in borrowed quarters: a vacant house for the 1916-1917 term, and then in the U.F.A. hall which was built in 1918. The school was built in 1925 by George and Orville Jensen. The school finally closed in 1948 and the students were bussed to Sexsmith. Teachers were Agnes Ferris, Miss B. Hallet, Miss C.H. Johnston, Ethel Turner, Marion Morrison, Margaret O’Neill, George Grover, Miss S. Olson, Miss Frewing, Miss M. Wheatley, Gertrude Brightwell, Olive Adsett, Ruth Axelson, Milton Robertson, Miss M. Meiklejohn, Alice Hettinger, Miss M. R. Burton, Jean Fraser-Smith, Miss M. Jaque, Shirley Love and Alice Samuelson (supervisor).The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.023Clairmont Lake School District 3303. — 1931-1964. — 9 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.Clairmont Lake School was built in 1918, but for a year or two before there was a school house, classes were held in various places: the Baptist Church manse, the upper floor of George White’s pool hall, and a “little brown shack” on 100th Avenue. The first teacher was Mrs. Bessie Caldwell. Miss Green came in 1918 to teach in the newly built Clairmont School, followed by Margaret and Isobel McNaught. Other teachers at Clairmont included Wilford S. McDonald, Anne Lawford (Mrs. McDonald), Philip Ault, Catherine Ault, Martha Gudlaugson, Claude Cavett, Mr. Dwyer, Gordon Forbes, Irene Johnson, Laura Johnson, Dorothy Shaw, Rene Mellott, Eleanor Morris, Delva Murchie, Mabel Mayne, Florence Lantinga, Miss Kyle, Frank Toews, Anna Drysdale, Jean and Alice McCaig (Drysdale), Shirley Love (Hackwell), and Eleanor Bain. In 1928, a second room was added to the school site which by now also had a barn, a woodshed and the usual outhouses, one for the girls and one for the boys. In the 1940s, a Home & School Association was started which helped fund and organize special events and activities. In 1946, when Clairmont lost its status as a village, the school was included in Grande Prairie School Division No. 14. In 1962, the school was closed and the students bussed to the Harry Balfour School in Grande Prairie.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education. The photographs, taken in the late 50s, are of the school, the barn, and a woodshed on the property. A List of Electors for the 1960 Federal Election is also included.
 
Clairmont Lake School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Clairmont Lake school house (district #3303) was built in 1918 and was included in Grande Prairie School Division No.14 when Clairmont lost its status as a villiage in 1946. The school closed in 1962.
Location: 0063.02.023.1
Clairmont Lake School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Clairmont Lake school barn.
Location: 0063.02.023.2
Clairmont Lake School Outbuilding, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A woodshed on the Clairmont Lake school property.
Location: 0063.02.023.3
SubSeries 063.02.024Craigellachie School District 4035. — 1929-1949. — 3 cm of textual records.Craigellachie School District was formed in 1921, but the log schoolhouse was not finished until January 1923. The name “Craigellachie” was chosen from those submitted, it being suggested by William Greig who was from Craigellachie, Scotland. Mrs. Haddock was the first teacher.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. It includes a letter written by a teacher identified only as “Gert” regarding transportation difficulties for rural teachers. This is Gert Webber, who taught at Craigellachie.
SubSeries 063.02.025Crystal Creek School District 3403. — 1930-1958. — 2 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.Crystal Creek School was built in 1917, although the district was formed c. 1914 and school taught in the church. Mr. Allan Boyd was in charge of construction. In 1930, the school was enlarged, in 1933 a teacherage was moved in, and in 1934 a new barn was constructed. The school continued to operate until 1956, when busses began transporting the students to Grande Prairie. The school building was sold and became a house at 9920-101 Avenue in Grande Prairie.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. The photographs, taken in the late 50’s, show the school, the barn and some sheds on the property.
 
Crystal Creek School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Crystal Creek school house (district #3403) was constructed in 1917 and operated until 1956 when students were then bussed to Grande Prairie to continue their studies. The school building was sold and became a house at 9920-101 Grande Prairie.
Location: 0063.02.025.1
Crystal Creek School Outbuildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
Sheds on the Crystal Creek school property.
Location: 0063.02.025.2
Crystal Creek School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The barn on the Crystal Creek school property was built in 1934.
Location: 0063.02.025.3
SubSeries 063.02.026Currie School District 3767. — 1929-1960. — 2 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.Currie School site was located northwest of Clairmont Lake and contained a frame school and teacherage. In 1956, the parents voted to close the school and bus the students to Grande Prairie. The school site and buildings were sold in 1959. Some of the teachers included Martha Gudlaugson, Wilma Robinson, Ethel Mayer, Alice Sutherland, Marguerite Meiklejohn, Reina McKInney, Martha Gitzel, Henry Wiebe, Ethel Nagy, Bert Lysiak, Clement C. Upshall, and Esther Beck.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. The photographs, taken in the late 50s, are of the school, the teacherage, the barn and outhouse.
 
Currie School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Currie school house (district #3767) was located northwest of Clairmont Lake. In 1956, the parents voted to close the school and bus the students to Grande Prairie and in 1959 the school house and its buildings were sold.
Location: 0063.02.026.1
Currie Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Currie school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.026.2
Currie School Outbuildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn and outhouse on the Currie school property.
Location: 0063.02.026.3
SubSeries 063.02.027East Kleskun School District 3635. — 1930-1958. — 2 cm of textual records.East Kleskun School was located east of the Kleskun Hills. It was organized in 1919, and school was taught in an empty house until the school was ready in September. The school was built on NW 30-72-3-W6th in 1919 and a teacherage added to the site in 1937. Miss Dorothy Morrison was the first teacher. She was followed by Mrs. Jim Storm, Frieda Raisin, Hazel Peterson, Miss Nelson, Mrs. Urich, Cleora White, Grace Ferris, Mr. Black, Myrtle Tolley, Miss Reith, Emily Clifford, Margaret Hardisty, Luella Philips, Marie Henning, Noreen O’Connell, Eileen Murray, Valentine Wallace, Annie Chugg, A.G. Nicholson, Clarice Wold, Julia Thompson, Eileen Steed, Paul Schau, Margaret White, Edna Kiselczuk and William Adair. The school operated until June 1957, when the board voted to centralize to Bezanson or Grande Prairie. The site, including land, school, teacherage and barn were sold to a local farmer that fall.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.028Elmworth School District 3791. — 1930-1970. — 23 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs. — 8 blueprints.The first Elmworth School was built in 1921 and opened January 2, 1922, with Miss Edna Small as the teacher. By 1937, the population had increased sufficiently for a two room school to be opened. This increased to three rooms in 1949 and four in 1952. Under consolidation, students were bussed in from Hazelmere and Craigellachie by 1949, and later from Haven, Ravenswood, Itipaw, Rio Grande, and Cariboo. In the early 50s, the Hazelmere School house was moved into Elmworth and added to the school along with another classroom, for a total of six rooms. 1955 brought the addition of a staff room, two classrooms and a Science room; and the final addition was a gymnasium, library, more classrooms and an office. Teachers at Elmworth included E. Alice Taylor, W.B. Mitchell, F. Shannon, Reta Ash, Mary (Turner) Pandachuck, Jean Pow, Marion Heller, Agnes Patterson, Amy (Sharland) Pandachuck, Edna Moyer, Florence (Reimer) Purves, Jean Purves, Alice Wood, Dorcas Dalgleish, J.D. Noble, Wilma Reid, Edith Lee, Elnora Barker, Ferne Finch, W. Taylor, Ron Quinn, Stella Holtz, Dina White, Ethel Hill, Marilyn Ayre, V. McNeil, Frank Vanderkley, Grant Henderson, Helena Pretyluk, Cecile Dixson, and Mr. & Mrs. McCue.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education. There are also records from the various building programs. The blueprints are of a two-room addition planned in 1954, the proposed addition in 1961, the actual addition in 1961, the location of radiation and steam mains in the old school in 1962, and a landscape plan in 1962. The photographs, taken in the late 50s, are of the school, a teacherage, and a log barn.
 
Elmworth School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Elmworth School (district #3791) originated as a one room school house in 1921 and grew to modern multi-roomed school in the mid 1950’s. Under consolidation, students were bussed from Hazelmere and Craigellachie.
Location: 0063.02.028.1
Elmworth Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Elmworth school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.028.2
Elmworth School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A log barn on the Elmworth school property.
Location: 0063.02.028.3
 
A Two-Classroom Addition to the School at Elmworth, Alberta, c. 1954
blueprint
Floor Plan
Location: 0063.02.028.1
Addition to the Existing School at Elmworth, Alberta, 1962
blueprint
Sketch Elevations–East Elevation
Location: 0063.02.028.2
Addition to the Existing School at Elmworth, Alberta, 1962
blueprint
Sketch floor plan of the proposed addition
Location: 0063.02.028.3
Cover Over Existing Light-Well at Elmworth, 1962
blueprint
Details of corrugated fiberglass cover over existing light-well
Location: 0063.02.028.4
Addition to School at Elmworth, 1962
blueprint
Sketch plan, scheme 4, with Cost analysis, scheme 4
Location: 0063.02.028.5
Addition to School at Elmworth, 1962
blueprint
South Elevation
Location: 0063.02.028.6
Main Floor Plan–Elmworth School, 1962
blueprint
drawing showing radiation and steam mains as installed
Location: 0063.02.028.7
Elmworth School Landscape Plan, 1962
blueprint
includes planting key
Location: 0063.02.028.8
SubSeries 063.02.029Equity School District 3929. — 1929-1957. — 2 cm of textual records. — 9 photographs.The first school in the Equity district was held in a log cabin on Alex Novlesky’s homestead in 1920. The first teacher was Miss C. Smith (Mrs. L. Heiken). She was followed by Mr. M. McLeod, Helen Watson (Mrs. George Badger), Miss Burgess, Miss Cobb, Nain Grimmett, Cleora White, Alberdina Ganzeveld, Gertie Gourley, Ettie Cochrane, Norma Geeson, Stella Becker, Dora Doyle, Irene Johnson, Jean Fraser-Smith, Nicholas Onyschuk, Philip Cox, Shirley Cooksley, K. Hrehirchuk, Mary Warren, Bernice Willis, Mary Smart, Mary Kirkham, Nancy Wood and Muriel Coleman. In 1939, another school was built in the area and called North Equity. Grade Nine students from both schools attended North Sexsmith School. Equity School closed in 1951, and the pupils were bussed to Sexsmith. In 1954, the woodshed and barn were sold and moved off the property.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education. . The photographs, taken in the late 50s, are of the school, the teacherage, the barn, and a woodshed on the property.
 
Equity School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Equity school house (district #3929) was built in 1939. When the school closed in 1951, students were bussed to Sexsmith to continue their schooling.
Location: 0063.02.029.1
Equity School Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Equity school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.029.2
Equity School Woodshed, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A woodhouse located on the Equity school property.
Location: 0063.02.029.3
Equity School Pumphouse, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A pumphouse on the Equity school property.
Location: 0063.02.029.4
Equity School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn situated on the Equity school property.
Location: 0063.02.029.5
SubSeries 063.02.030Fitzsimmons School District 4500. — 1930-1958. — 4 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Fitzsimmons School District #4500 was formed for the area north of the Lindsay School District in 1930, when the population of the district became too great for the Lindsay School. The school was named after Scotty Fitzsimmons who had homesteaded in the district. By September 1931 the school house was built and ready for students. In 1932, a barn was added to the site. The first teacher was Dorothy Cowell. She was followed by Isobel Horsely, Stella Becker, Harry Humphries, Josephine Price, Marguerite Meiklejohn, Theoline Yaremko, Ruth Axelson, Gertrude Brightwell, Evelyn Krantz, Velva Regnier, Sadie Sarmaga, Pam Hunter, and Margaret White. In 1938, Fitzsimmons School came under School Division 14. an the School Board wrapped up in 1939. It was replaced by an advisory body of parents from the district. The school was closed in 1956 and the students then attended Bezanson School.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education. The photographs, taken in the late 50s, are of the school and a log barn and outhouse.
 
Fitzsimmons School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Fitzsimmons school house (district #4500) was constructed in the early 1930’s as a result of over population in the Lindsay School District. The school was closed in 1956 and the students then attended Bezanson School.
Location: 0063.02.030.1
Fitzsimmons School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The barn on the Fitzsimmons school property was built in 1932.
Location: 0063.02.030.2
SubSeries 063.02.031Five Mile Creek School District 3287. — 1930-1963. — 3 cm of textual records.Five Mile Creek School District was organized in 1914, and that same year a school was built on S.E. 4-72-5 W6th. The first teacher was Miss Moody. In 1925, the area south to Bear Creek was added to the district and the school was moved to SE 28-71-5 W6th. At that time, school started in August, with July and January being the months of holidays. Phyllis Lamb was the first teacher at this site, followed by May Broadbridge, Miss Burke, Miss Creed, Miss Inkster, Ruth Rutherford, Gertie Brightwell, Ross Kitchen, Wilma Robinson and Winnie Willis. In 1934, an addition was made to the school for senior grades and the high school students from Twilight and Crystal Creek joined them. Brian Pearcy was the first principal and high school teacher. Others included Walter Kujath, Jack Holmes, and Rene Mellott. The High School closed in 1941, and the room used for junior high until consolidation in 1956.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.032Flying Shot School District 3399. — 1931-1963. — 3 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs. — 1 blueprints.The first Flying Shot School was a low log building on the Clifford place opened in 1917. The building was hospital and home to Reverand and Mrs. Forbes and had also served as the courthouse in Grande Prairie. Flying Shot Lake was originally an Aboriginal settlement and there were Aboriginal children who attended the school at the time. Miss MacDonald and Miss Jeanette McPhee taught at the first Flying Shot School. In 1920, a new school building was built west of the old school site on Dan Owen’s land. The first teacher in the new school was Miss Marian Morrison. In 1948, the Flying Shot area formed a new school district west and south of the Flying Shot School to accommodate the growing population. The new school district was known as “Lucky Tree”. At this time, the Flying Shot School was moved east again onto land donated by Mr. Howes, close to the original site. After the move, teachers were Mrs. Pam Tissington, Mrs. Rimbey, and Mrs. Helen Tissington. Flying Shot School closed in 1956.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education. The blueprint is for an addition to Flying Shot Lake School c. 1943. The photographs, taken in 1964, are of the school, the teacherage, and the barn.
 
Flying Shot School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Flying Shot school house (district #3399) was built in 1920.
Location: 0063.02.032.1
Flying Shot Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Flying Shot school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.032.2
Flying Shot School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Flying Shot school property.
Location: 0063.02.032.3
 
Addition To Flying Shot, 1943
blueprint
Plan and east Elevation
Location: 0063.02.032.1
SubSeries 063.02.033Gimle School District 3786. — 1929-1956. — 2 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Gimle School was organized in 1919 by the Icelandic inhabitants of the farming community south of Hythe. Mrs. Kate Morgan was the first teacher, followed by Ada Rumele. Other teachers included Miss Green, Kathleen Robson, Judd Perry, Molly Steward, Miss A. Bolton, Vivian Hood, Elma Elkins, Kathleen Ross, Isabel Perry, Peggy Martin, Genevieve Hutson, Ada Fletcher, Mary Bauman, and Connie Kerr. The school house was also used as a church and a community hall until the Albright Hall was built. With consolidation, the students from Gimle were bussed to Hythe and the school was closed.The sub-series consits of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education. The photographs are of the school (the old Mt. Saskatoon school) and the barn.
 
Gimle School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Gimli school house (district #3786) was organized in the Icelandic farming community south of Hythe, in 1919. The school was also used as the community’s church and hall until the Albright Hall was built.
Location: 0063.02.033.1
Gimle School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Gimli school property.
Location: 0063.02.033.2
SubSeries 063.02.034Glass Lake School District 3785. — 1939-1954. — 2 cm of textual records.Glass Lake School was located on NW 22-73-10 W6, east of Hythe. Teachers over the years were Mrs. McCallum, Kathleen Robson, Gladys Park, Mr. Floen, Mrs. Nepstad, Mrs. Cunningham, and Mrs. Ventress. The school closed c. 1950 and the students were bussed to Hythe.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.035Goodfare School District 4314. — 1929-1959. — 8 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.Goodfare School was located on the N.E. ¼ 9-72-12 W6. The first school, built of logs, opened July 28, 1928, with Miss Cecille McArthur as the teacher. Some years later, a log barn was built in the school yard and a small porch added to the front of the school. These were sold and the school lot reverted to the owner of the quarter section when the school was closed in the 1950s. Teachers who taught at Goodfare School included Charlie Crombie, Annie Welch, Mrs. E. Bricker, Fanny Jean Proctor, Ethel Groger, Donalda Koebke, Gladys Park, Alice Pfau, Mr. M. Cunningham and Arthur Fletcher.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the Department of Education and the school division. The photographs are of the Goodfare Senior (old Sinclair Lake) School, the Goodfare Junior School (old Annellan), and the old Pendleton Barn.
 
Goodfare Senior (Old Sinclair Lake) School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Goodfare school house (district #4314) was located on the NE 1/4 9-72-12 W6 and was opened in 1928. The was closed in the 1950’s.
Location: 0063.02.035.1
Goodfare Junior (Old Annellan) School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Goodfare school house (district #4314) was located on the NE 1/4 9-72-12 W6 and was opened in 1928. The was closed in the 1950’s.
Location: 0063.02.035.2
Old Pendleton Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The barn situated on the Goodfare school property.
Location: 0063.02.035.3
SubSeries 063.02.036Grande Prairie Association for Retarded Children. — 1960. — 0.1 cm of textual records.The County of Grande Prairie was one of the contributors to the first school for the mentally handicapped in Grande Prairie. The Peace School of Hope was opened in 1955, the third of its kind in the province of Alberta. Initially, the school operated in the basement of the Masonic Hall with nine pupils. Mrs. M. Roberts from Edmonton was the first teacher.The sub-series consists of only one document, a statement of funds for the construction of “The Grande Prairie Association for Retarded Children’s School Building.”
SubSeries 063.02.037Grande Prairie School District 2357. — 1947-1964. — 8 cm of textual records.The Grande Prairie School District was formed in 1911, and as the town of Grande Prairie grew, it became the center for higher education in the region. Students in the County of Grande Prairie would sometimes attend high school in Grande Prairie. It was for these students that the Wapiti Dorm was built. As both the Town and County System expanded, they cooperated in providing educational opportunities for all the students in the area.The sub-series consists of correspondence between School District #2357 and School Division #14 regarding issues which affected both systems. A major issue towards the end of the collection regards the creation of the Grande Prairie Vocational School.
SubSeries 063.02.038Grovedale School District 4910. — 1945-1961. — 1 cm of textual records.The first movement towards a school at Grovedale was in 1940, when a petition was sent to the Department of Education requesting the formation of a school district. It was not until 1944, however, that a “temporary” school was started in a cabin with Frank Thompson as teacher. Later teachers included Vera Gabler, Aleda Stoll, Elinor Bulford, Olive Gerow, Mrs. Gorrie, Miss Glendenning, Mr. J.L. McIntosh, Charlotte Olson, Verna Lucky, Dorothy Hove, Mrs. M Sundberg, and Mrs. H. Barker. In 1948, a teacherage was added to the site, and in 1957 a new two-room school was built. In 1960, Bridge Creek school was closed, and both teacher and students transferred to Grovedale. This necessitated putting the old school back into use with three teachers. The temporary school had become not only permanent, but the centralized school in the area south of the Wapiti River.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school trustees, teachers, parents, the department of Education, and the school division.
SubSeries 063.02.039Halcourt School District 2835. — 1924-1959. — 6 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs. — 1 maps.School in the Halcourt area was first taught in the community church in 1912, with Marion McNaught as the teacher. After some months, a log school and a log barn were built across the road from the church. In about 1917, the school was moved to Halcourt corner. T.G. Irwin was the first teacher here, followed by Mrs. Harry Davis and Edna Small. The log school was in use until 1939, when a lumber building was constructed. As the country schools around Halcourt closed, students were bussed into Halcourt. After 1945, the school district acquired the Orangeman’s Hall for school classes, and in 1950, the Appleton School building was moved to Halcourt. Halcourt finally closed in the 50s when continued consolidation made Elmworth the regional school. Teachers who taught at Halcourt were Isabel McNaught, Kay Chuckaluk, Helen Bacon, Pearl Wakefield, Edna Keough, Joe Sauder, August Stolee, Frank Toews, Mrs. C. Dalgleish, Mrs. G. Conley, Miss Anderson, Miss Probst, Miss Dever, Miss Hughston, and Miss Stephens.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents and the school division. The map is a Department of Education map of the Halcourt School District. Three photographs taken in the late 50s are of two school houses (one of which is the old Appleton School), and of the yard with out houses, barn and sheds.
 
Halcourt School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Halcourt school house (district #2835) was built in 1939 and was the centre for many students whose schools had closed during the 1940’s. Halcourt School closed in the 1950’s.
Location: 0063.02.039.1
Halcourt, Old Appleton School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Appleton school house (district #2835) was moved to Halcourt in 1950.
Location: 0063.02.039.2
Halcourt School Outbuildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
Barns, out houses and sheds on the Halcourt school property.
Location: 0063.02.039.3
 
Halcourt School District,
map
Latest Confirmed Map of the Halcourt School District
Location: 0063.02.039.1
SubSeries 063.02.040Harry Balfour School. — 1955-1966. — 20 cm of textual records. — 4 blueprints.Harry Balfour School was the regional county school built in Grande Prairie in 1955, with classes starting in the fall of 1956. The school was named after H.E. Balfour, who had been a School Inspector for many years. There were approximately 218 students when Harry Balfour school first opened.The sub-series consists of records regarding the establishment of Harry Balfour School and school records from the initial years of operation. Included are a certificate of title, a site plan and 3 blueprints of the proposed addition to the school in 1961. There is also correspondence between school board, parents, teachers and the school division.
 
Certificate of Title, 1956
Certificate of Title
Creator: Certificate of Title
A certificate of title for land in the townsite of Grande Prairie in the name of the County of Grande Prairie No. 1. To Certify that County of Grande Prairie No.1 is now the owner of and in lot containing 7.26 acres more or less in the townsite of Grande Prairie
Location: 0063.02.040.01
 
Proposed Addition to Harry Balfour School, 1961
blueprint
Floor plan of new addition only
Location: 0063.02.040.2
Proposed Addition to Harry Balfour School, 1961
blueprint
Floor plan of new addition only
Location: 0063.02.040.3
Harry Balfour School add County of GR.PR. No.1, 1964
blueprint
Plan of Avondale School Grounds
Location: 0063.02.040.4
Proposed Addition to Harry Balfour School, c. 1961
blueprint
Classroom plan and cost estimate
Location: 0063.02.040.5
SubSeries 063.02.041Haven School District 4732. — 1939-1954; 1966. — 1 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Haven School was built with volunteer labour out of logs and materials donated by the settlers, plus a grant from the provincial government for $150. It was located four miles south of Hinton Trail corner, and opened in the fall of 1937 with Josephine Price as the first teacher. At its peak there were more than 30 pupils. Teachers who taught at Haven included Mrs. Robert Parks, Mrs. Gordon Moyer, Ann Pyrcz, Evelyn Rieger, Mrs. Arthur Mounce, Kathleen Burgess, Ronald Quinn and Dinah White. During the years of teacher shortages, supervisors were used in the classroom. Haven School was closed with consolidation in the mid 50s.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school trustees, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. The photographs, taken in the late 50s, show an abandoned log school house and a barn of vertical log construction with a tin roof.
 
Haven School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Haven school house (district #4732) was situated south of Hinton Trail corner and was opened in 1937. It had more than 30 students at its peak and was closed with consolidation in the mid 1950’s.
Location: 0063.02.041.1
Haven School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Haven school property.
Location: 0063.02.041.2
SubSeries 063.02.042Hayfield School District 4661. — 1940-1953; 1981. — 1 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Hayfield School was started in 1930 in a rented house with Miss Jean Montgomery as the first teacher. In 1933, a notched log building was built on the NW ¼ of Section 22, Township 71, Range 11, West of the 6th meridian southwest of Beaverlodge. The school was named for the 40 acre hay field viewed from the site. Miss Ruth Conley was the first teacher at the new school and there were 42 pupils. Miss Reaume was the last teacher. The school was closed in 1951 and the pupils bussed to Beaverlodge.The sub-series consists of a 1950 list of trustees, a few supply lists and transfer cards, and a two page 1981 report from Alberta Culture Historic Sites. The photographs show a log school house with five large windows, and a log barn with a flat pole roof.
 
Hayfield School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Hayfield school house (district #4661) was constructed in 1933 on NW 1/4 22-71-11 W6 and was named for the 40 acre hay field viewed from the site. When the school was closed in 1951, the students were bussed to Beaverlodge to continue their studies.
Location: 0063.02.042.1
Hayfield School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Hayfield school property.
Location: 0063.02.042.2
SubSeries 063.02.043Hermit Lake School District 3250. — 1930-1957. — 3 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Hermit Lake School District was established in 1915, although classes had been held since 1913. In 1916 a frame school was built. Later, a lean-to kitchen was added to the school to provide hot lunches for the students. In 1928, the school was moved one mile east of its original location and the lean-to kitchen replaced by the entrance porch. A teacherage was also added to the site. Hermit Lake School closed in 1956, but was used as a community hall until 1976, when it was moved to the Grande Prairie Museum Heritage Village. The first teacher at Hermit Lake School was Molly Sharp. Other teachers included Velma Cranston, Mary Robertson, Dorothy Donaldson, Grace Wishart, Fred Howlett, Eileen Murray, N.E.Wood, M. Burgess, Ruth Conley, Grace Cook, Ellen Rasmussen, Ethel Hawkes, Mae Blom, Muriel Coleman and Edith Jackson. Location of the school was SE 5-72-7 W6.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. One photograph is of the school house; the other is of the teacherage (known as the Hermitage) and school barn with the winter’s supply of wood.
 
Hermit Lake School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Hermit Lake school house (district #3250) was built in 1916 and was closed in 1956 to be later used as a community hall until 1976.
Location: 0063.02.043.1
Hermit Lake Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Hermit Lake school teacherage, also known as the Hermitage, was built in the late 1920’s.
Location: 0063.02.043.2
SubSeries 063.02.044Hythe School District 3194. — 1929-1962. — 23 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs. — 1 blueprints.The original school at Hythe, called Happy Valley, was built in 1914. Miss K. Robson was the first teacher. When Hythe became a village in 1929, a new frame school was built and the name of the district changed from Happy Valley to Hythe. By 1950, the small country schools were beginning to close and Hythe became a central school. A new Elementary and a new Junior High School were built there.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education. There is also a Revenue Fund Assets & Abilities report from 1949. The blueprint is of the addition to the Hythe School in 1951. The photographs are of a white frame school with a large row of windows on one side and a long frame barn taken in the 50s, and a photograph of the new school with gym taken in 1957.
 
Hythe School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Hythe school house (district #3194) was built in 1929 when Hythe became a villiage. In 1950, when small country schools were beginning to close, Hythe became a central school and a new Elementary and Junior High School were built.
Location: 0063.02.044.1
Hythe School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Hythe school property.
Location: 0063.02.044.2
 
Addition to the Hythe School, 1951
blueprint
hand-drawn architectural drawing on brown paper
Location: 0063.02.044.1
SubSeries 063.02.045Independent Valley School District 4604. — 1940-1952. — 2 cm of textual records.Independent Valley School was located near the British Columbia border, west of Beaverlodge. In the small community, the school was also used as a church. The main difficulties were finding teachers and funds to pay the teachers. Teachers included Muriel Johnson, Ada Fletcher, Eileen Hill, M. Platte, Harriet Funnell Sullivan, and Mildred Pratt.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school trustees, teachers, janitorial staff (parents and students) and the school division.
SubSeries 063.02.046Itipaw School District 4477. — 1929-1954. — 4 cm of textual records.The organization of Itipaw School District was initiated in 1929, but disputes about taxes kept the school from being built until 1933-34. School opened in the fall of 1934 and remained open until 1952, when low population forced closure of the school. Students were then vanned to Elmworth. In 1953, the school buildings were sold, and in 1955 the site was sold. Teachers at Itipaw included Stella Hohol, Edna Moyer, Vera Sutherland, Ruth Axelson, W. H. Bullis, Kate Keillar, Rhoda Russill, Mrs. Cook, and Elaine Grant. The name Itipaw was taken from the word Wapiti, spelling it backward.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school board, teachers, parents, school division, and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.047Kemble School District 4558. — 1931-1937. — 1 cm of textual records.Kemble School District was organized in 1931 for residents of the Goodfare District west of the Steeprock School District and east of Kelly Lake. At the time it was established, there were sufficient children to warrant a school, but by the time a school was built on 29-71-13 W6 five years later, all the families with school-age children had moved out of the district. The district was then left with the problem of a newly-built facility with no children to attend.The sub-series consists of correspondence between trustees, school inspectors and government officials as the district is organized and decisions are made about financing, building and using the new facility.
SubSeries 063.02.048Kleskun Hill School District 3428. — 1931-1960. — 2 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Kleskun Hill School was opened in the spring of 1916 in a tent, as the school house was not complete. For the first years, school was taught from spring through fall, and holidays were during the winter. The first teacher was Miss Sarah Bennett, followed by Miss McColm and Mrs. Wilson. A teacherage was built at the end of World War I, and the first teacher to occupy the teacherage was Wesley Sutherland, a war vet with his English war-bride. In the early 20s, a fire destroyed the school and a vacant store building was moved from Clairmont to serve as the school. In 1937, Kleskun Hill School came under the Grande Prairie School Division. Teachers at Kleskun Hill included Jimmy Ald, Alfreda Reavley, F.G. Irwin, Mrs. Nelson, Gwen Stewart, Mr. & Mrs. Black, Delva (Brown) Murchie, Miss E.J. Roberts, Miss L.H. Johnson, Florence (Smith) Wales, Winnifred Willis, Myrtle Tolley, Mrs. M.J. Bickner, Marion Heller, Rhoda Patterson, C.M. McIntosh, and Elaine Fitzpatrick. After 1947, no teachers were available so supervisors were used and children did correspondence lessons. The school then closed and students bussed to school in Bezanson.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division, and the Department of Education. The photographs show two views of a white frame school house with large windows on one side.
 
Kleskun Hill School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
In the early 1920’s a fire destroyed the original Kleskun Hill school house (district #3428) so a vacant store building was moved from Clairmont to serve as a school. After 1947, when there were not enough teachers, the school was closed and the students were bussed to a school in Bezanson.
Location: 0063.02.048.1
Kleskun Hill School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
In the early 1920’s a fire destroyed the original Kleskun Hill school house (district #3428) so a vacant store building was moved from Clairmont to serve as a school. After 1947, when there were not enough teachers, the school was closed and the students were bussed to a school in Bezanson.
Location: 0063.02.048.2
SubSeries 063.02.049Kleskun Lake School District 2743. — 1932-1952. — 1 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Kleskun Lake School was established c. 1912 when the number of children in the district exceeded the capacity of the Kleskun Hill School. Robert Cochrane was the contractor. Teachers included Edna Agar, H. B. Kellett, A. V. Raison, Agnes Melsness, Martha Hennig, H.L. Bjork, Gordon Forbes, Martha Gudlaugson, Newton Grimmett, Beverly Macomber, Marjorie Sebastion, Beth Thorne, Henry Wiebe, and Venice Jones. Kleskun Lake School closed with the advent of consolidation in the late 40s or early 50s.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The photographs are of a white frame school with six double windows on one side, and a long barn of slab construction on walls and roof.
 
Kleskun Lake School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Kleskun Lake School (district #2743) was established in the early 1910’s when the student population exceeded the capacity of the Keskun Hill School. The school closed with consolidation in the late 1940’s, early 1950’s.
Location: 0063.02.049.1
Kleskun Lake School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Kleskyn Lake school property.
Location: 0063.02.049.2
SubSeries 063.02.050Klondyke Trail School District 4509. — 1931-1948. — 1 cm of textual records.Klondyke Trail School opened in September, 1933, and was located in the south-east corner of SE 13-71-9-W6. The school operated until 1943. Then the building was moved to Lower Beaverlodge in 1948 and served that school district. People who were instrumental in organizing the Klondyke School District were Gust Gitzel and Jack Bullis as well as Fred Dolphin, Henry Taylor, Harry Taylor, and Louis Ulmer. Teachers were Martha Hennig, Joe Montgomery, Howard Minchin, Edna Stokke, Eileen Murray, Bernice Eshpeter and Matilda Kmicik.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.051La Glace School District 3371. — 1921, 1939-1959. — 17 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.The La Glace School District was organized in 1916 and approval sought from the Ministry of Education to build a school. The first school year was 1918-1919, with classes held in Albin Hoflin’s cabin. Mary Collette was the first teacher, followed by Mrs. Pickering, E.H. Keith, F.G. McNaughton, Mr. Strong, Miss Mann, Miss Metcalf (Christianson), Mr. Williamson, Edith Lechelt, Parker Norden, Lucy Hardman, Miss Krantz, Miss Cunningham, Doris Eide and Miss Clarke. The first school was built in 1921 on the NE corner of S.E. 8-74-8 W 6th. In 1938, a high school was built in the town of La Glace, and two years later the elementary school was moved into town. As the small one-room schools began to close down under consolidation, La Glace became one of the centralized schools and a new multi-roomed facility was built.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. It also contains a 1920 debenture certificate and some 1940 correspondence regarding late settlement of the debenture. The photographs are of white frame school house of one room, a multi-roomed school of cement construction, and the yard showing out houses, sheds and barns.
 
La Glace School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A modern mult-roomed La Glass school (district #3371) was built in the late 1930’s.
Location: 0063.02.051.1
La Glace School Yard, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The La Glace school yard with out buildings in the background.
Location: 0063.02.051.2
La Glace School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The La Glace school house (district #3371) was built in 1921 on the NE corner of SE 8-74-8 W6.
Location: 0063.02.051.3
SubSeries 063.02.052Lambert School District 3932. — 1921-1964. — 14 cm of textual records. — 6 photographs.Lambert School No. 3932 was located on S.E. 29-73-12 W6. The log school was built in 1920, complete with fenced yard, water well and homemade desks. The school barn was built in 1921. Mr. Keeping was the first teacher. Due to a lack of students, the school was shut down until more settlers arrived. This original school burned down and Mr. Pollock’s warehouse was used as a school until the Municipality built a new frame school in 1948. Eventually, another school was moved in and Aldergrove students were vanned to Lambert. Then, another school was moved in and Preston Lake students were brought to Lambert. In 1960, all the Lambert schools closed and the children were bussed to Hythe.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. There is also a List of Electors from the 1960 federal election. The photographs show three white frame school houses, 2 teacherages and a barn.
 
Lambert School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Lambert school house (district #3932) was located on SE 29-73-12 W6. The original school burnt down in 1921 and a new one was not built until 1948 when there was an abundance of students. The Lambert School ran until 1960 and the students were bussed to Hythe to continue their schooling.
Location: 0063.02.052.1
Lambert School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Lambert school house (district #3932) was located on SE 29-73-12 W6. The original school burnt down in 1921 and a new one was not built until 1948 when there was an abundance of students. The Lambert School ran until 1960 and the students were bussed to Hythe to continue their schooling.
Location: 0063.02.052.2
Lambert School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Lambert school house (district #3932) was located on SE 29-73-12 W6. The original school burnt down in 1921 and a new one was not built until 1948 when there was an abundance of students. The Lambert School ran until 1960 and the students were bussed to Hythe to continue their schooling.
Location: 0063.02.052.3
Lambert Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A Lambert School Teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.052.4
Lambert Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A Lambert School Teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.052.5
Lambert School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Lambert school property.
Location: 0063.02.052.6
SubSeries 063.02.053Lindsay School District 3898. — 1928-1957. — 6 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs. — 1 maps.Settlers in the Bezanson area first met for the purpose of organizing a school in the summer of 1920. A site on the NW 23-72-3 W6th was chosen, and upon approval of the Department of Education, Bill Welsh, of Grande Prairie, began construction. The school was named after one of the pioneers in the area, Mr. George Lindsay, and opened on September 1, 1921with about 30 students. Miss E. Carter was the first teacher. In 1926-27, the school was closed for two months. The money saved by the closure was used to build a teacherage. By 1933, enrollment was high enough to demand a second room for the high school students, and in 1938, a new Lindsay High School was built on the SE 16-72-3 W6th (near the hamlet of Bezanson) where grades 1-9 were also taught, and the Lindsay Primary School was closed. In 1950 the Lindsay Primary was also moved into the hamlet and five school districts amalgamated under the title of Lindsay School District 3898: Somme, Bezanson, Lindsay, East Kleskun and Fitzsimmons. In 1955, the name was changed from Lindsay School to Bezanson School District 3898. Teachers at Lindsay School included Hazel Lupton, J.H. Dixon, D.G. Scott, Fred Bryenton, Murray Skinner, Mary Clifford, Miss Dobson, Miss Lewis, Eileen Skirten, Mrs. Kelsey, Newton Grimmett, Isabel Moody, Jean Westendorf, Marie Bayens, H.B. Carrico, Isabel McKenzie, S.W. Brooks, Albert Thompson, E.J. Meen, C.S. Carson, Noreen Ford, John Morrison, Marie Ames, W.E. Griffin, Roy Gouchey, and Fern Gouchey.The sub-series consists of school census and correspondence between the school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The map is a hand-drawn map of the quarter sections in the Lindsay School District, with land-owners names and location of their homes on it. The photographs show two white frame school houses with swings in front of them, a wood frame barn, and Bezanson teacherage at Lindsay School.
 
Lindsay School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Lindsay School (district #3898), named after the local pioneer George Lindsay, was opened in 1921 in the Bezanson area. In 1955 the name of the school district was changed to Bezanson School District .
Location: 0063.02.053.1
Lindsay School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Lindsay School (district #3898), named after the local pioneer George Lindsay, was opened in 1921 in the Bezanson area. In 1955 the name of the school district was changed to Bezanson School District.
Location: 0063.02.053.2
Lindsay School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Lindsay school property.
Location: 0063.02.053.3
Bezanson Teacherage at Lindsay School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
Bezanson 3898 teacherage at Lindsay School when it was still at the original site.
Location: 0063.02.053.4
 
Lindsay School District 3898, undated
map
Hand-drawn map of the quarter sections in the district, with land-owners names and location of homes.
Location: 0063.02.053.1
SubSeries 063.02.054Lower Beaverlodge School District 2812. — 1929-1959, 1981. — 4 cm of textual records. — 1 photographs.In 1910, the settlers at Lower Beaverlodge petitioned the government to form a school district for their children. School District #2812 was formed in 1912, the second in the Grande Prairie area. That same year a notched log school was built on the SE ¼ -16-71-9 W6th, 7 miles southeast of the community of Beaverlodge, by Billy Johnson. The total cost was $125.00. J.W. Wilkie was hired as the first teacher in September 1913 for $600 per year, plus $20.00 for lighting fires. The school was also used as a church and community center. In 1930, an influx of settlers from Germany created demand for a new building, a new site and a change in boundaries. The school was closed under consolidation in the 50s, and was moved to a park in Beaverlodge.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. There is also a 1981 Historic Sites report before the building was moved to the municipal park in Beaverlodge. The photograph shows the log school house on its original site, with attached porch and boarded up windows. A wood frame barn is in the background.
 
Lower Beaverlodge School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Lower Beaverlodge school house (district #2812) was built on the SE 1/4 16-71-9 W6 in 1912 and was closed under consolidation in the 1950’s. While it was running, the school house was also used as a church and a community centre.
Location: 0063.02.054.1
SubSeries 063.02.055Lucky Tree School District 4945. — 1947-1960. — 2 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.Lucky Tree School District #4945 was formed in the Dimdsale area on August 11, 1947, and a frame school moved in that same year. The school was named in September when four children of the Luckey family and five from the Greentree family were registered, making up almost half of the total attendance. For the first two years, only supervisors were available to oversee lessons, but in 1949 Miss Edith Olstad came as teacher. She was followed by Bernice Willis, Dolores Probst, Pearl Lester, Ruby Yates, and Mr. T.W. Collinge. Lucky Tree closed with consolidation in 1956 when the students began to be bussed into Grande Prairie.The sub-series consists of correspondence between the school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education. The photographs show a wood frame school (the old Wellington School), a small teacherage (moved from Millarston), and a shed-roofed barn.
 
Old Wellington School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Lucky Tree school house (district #4945) was built in the Dimsdale area in 1947 and closed with consolidation in 1956. The students were then bussed into Grande Prairie to continue their studies.
Location: 0063.02.055.1
Old Millarston Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Lucky Tree teacherage was moved from Millarston.
Location: 0063.02.055.2
Lucky Tree School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Lucky Tree school property.
Location: 0063.02.055.3
SubSeries 063.02.057Many Springs School District 4683. — 1940-1942. — 1 cm of textual records. — 1 maps.Many Springs School District was formed in the mid-thirties. The site chosen for the school was on SW 30-74-7 W6th, but a school was not affordable at the time. In the meantime, the pupils continued to attend the Buffalo Lake School. The teachers filled out separate registers for each of the two districts. During the late thirties and early fourties the ratepayers of the area worked hard to raise $750, with the understanding that when they reached their goal, the government would match it and they could go ahead and build their school. However, consolidation came into being and the school was never built.The sub-series consists of correspondence regarding the keeping of separate records of the Manysprings children attending Buffalo Lake School and a hand-drawn land map of the families in Manysprings. Other correspondence concerns Buffalo Lake School but is addressed to the secretary-treasurer of Manysprings.
 
Many Springs School District, [ca. 1940]
map
Hand drawn land plan of the Many Springs School district
Location: 0063.02.057.1
SubSeries 063.02.058MacHenry School District 2851. — 1929-1957. — 4 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs. — 2 blueprints.The first MacHenry School was a log structure built in 1912 by Ray Sears Sr. on the Emerson Land just east of Pine Creek. The second school, also of log, was built a little further east on S.W. of 16-73-6-W-6, the homestead of Tom Smith. The first teacher at the MacHenry School was Mr. Higbee, husband of Dr. Annie Higbee. Other teachers who taught there (not necessarily in order) included William Kinderwater, Miss Johnson, Miss Mary Collette, Mrs. Wheatfield, Mr. Cherry, Miss May Robinson, Clifford Ozee, Mrs. Ida Wilson, Garfield Walters, Miss Christie (Mrs. D. Coleman), Miss Reed (Mrs. J. Lowe), Miss E. Payne (1930-1936), Miss Lawley, Miss Roach, Miss Hornick, Miss Marie Poppen (1937-1940), Mrs. Kelsey, Miss Eva Alexandre (1940-1942), Miss Doris Eide, and Martha Kochalyk (1942-1943). Mrs. Jennie B. Bellamy taught from 1943-1952, at which time the school was closed.The sub-series consists of correspondence between the school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The blueprints are standard Government of Alberta, Department of Education plans for a 1940 style, low cost frame school with a closed porch. The photographs show a white frame school with a “McHenry School” name plate beside the front door and two un-painted barns of ship-lap construction.
 
MacHenry School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The MacHenry school house (district #2851) was built on SW 16-73-6 W6 and was closed in 1943.
Location: 0063.02.058.1
MacHenry School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The MacHenry school house (district #2851) was built on SW 16-73-6 W6 and was closed in 1943.
Location: 0063.02.058.2
MacHenry School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the MacHenry school property.
Location: 0063.02.058.3
 
Closed Porch for Low Cost Frame School, 1939
blueprint
Plan and south, west and north elevations.
Location: 0063.02.058.1
Low-Cost Frame School Plan for Pioneer and New Districts, 1938
blueprint
Plans, elevations, details for walls, doors, windows, blackboards, partitions, cupboards.
Location: 0063.02.058.2
SubSeries 063.02.059Meadowville School District 4488. — 1929-1958. — 4 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.Meadowville School District #4488 was established in the LaGlace area in 1930. The School was a frame building on the Angus Sutherland land, across from and east of John Blomli’s buildings. H. E. Balfour was the first official trustee and Mrs. Green the first teacher. The next year, 1931, the school burned down and school was held at Blomli’s house until a new frame school was built in 1932. Teachers from then on were Pearl Grimmett, Edna Stokke, Shirley Carter, Henry Hennig, Mrs. Bernard Hamm, Mabel Oakes, Lucille Burton, Mrs. Cornelia Siebert, Mrs. Frederickson, Mike Sebastian, Virginia Houseman, Joyce Cleve, May Spiden, Kay Johnson, and Mrs. James Lowe. The schoolhouse was bought c. 1950 by Mrs. Jake Schroeder, moved to Grande Prairie, and remodelled into a house.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. It includes a tax roll from about 1934 which shows legal description, area, valuation, owner and owner’s address. The photographs show a white frame school with a white teacherage and unpainted wood frame barn.
 
Meadowville School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Meadowville school house (district #4488) was built in 1932. After the school closed in the 1950’s, it was bought and moved to Grande Prairie were it was remodelled into a house.
Location: 0063.02.059.1
Meadowville Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The teacherage at Meadowville School.
Location: 0063.02.059.2
Meadowville School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Meadowville school property.
Location: 0063.02.059.3
SubSeries 063.02.060Millarston School District 4436. — 1930-1946. — 2 cm of textual records. — 4 photographs.Millarston School District was formed in 1929 for Township 70, Ranges 7 and 8, West of the sixth meridian. It was named after Anges Millar MacAlister, who first requested the Department of Education for a school in the area. A log school on a rock foundation was built in 1929. Mr. E.J. Rennick came to teach and build a small home (which would be the teacherage) on the site. He was followed by Margaret Lewis, Jessie Erskine, Bill Sparling, Don Caldwell, Jack Fisher, Claude Cavett, and Eileen Murray. In 1944, there were only 14 students registered (down from 32) and 11 in the neighbouring Pipestone Creek District so the schools were combined, with the Pipestone Creek students being “bussed” to Millarston and separate registers kept. This continued until 1949 when total enrollment for the two districts dropped to 10 pupils and the school was closed.The sub-series consists of correspondence between the school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The photographs, taken in the late 1950s, show an abandoned site with the log school house, teacherage and barns.
 
Millarston School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Millarston school house (district #4436) was built in 1929 and was named after Angus Millar MacAlister who first requested the Department of Education for a school in that area. The school was closed in 1949 when the student enrollement dropped to 10 students.
Location: 0063.02.060.1
Millarston School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the abandoned site of the Millarston school property.
Location: 0063.02.060.2
Millarston School Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Millarston school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.060.3
Millarston School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the abandoned site of the Millarston school property.
Location: 0063.02.060.4
SubSeries 063.02.061Molde School District 3518. — 1930-1959. — 4 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Molde School District was formed in 1918 and classes were first held in one of the homes of the pioneers. The first teacher at Molde School was Lena S. Hommy (Mrs. Sam Larson). She was followed by Alvie Baycroft, John McFarlane, Naomi Wade, Clara Dell, Mr. Lundberg, Lillian Wilson, Olivia Saunders, Pearl Liversidge, Ethel Mayer, Gertrude Brightwell, Lois Hardman, Kathleen Nay, R. Dolemo, Connie Hodges, Alma Johnson, Lucy Hardman. Molde School, when it was built in 1920, was located on the north-east corner of NE 27-74-10 W6. Later, a well was drilled and a barn added to the property. The school closed with consolidation in the 50s, and in 1959, the County of Grande Prairie sold the buildings, on site, to the Emanuel Ladies Aid of the Evangelical Lutheran Church to use as a community building.The sub-series consists of correspondence between the school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The photographs show a white frame school house and large wood frame barn in good condition. There is an outhouse behind the barn.
SubSeries 063.02.062Morningview School District 3514. — 1927-1957. — 3 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.Morningview School District was established in 1917 in the area south east of Sexsmith. The first school opened in 1918 in a vacant log house, but closed during the flu season that winter so the school could be used as a hospital. Later a school , barn and teacherage were built on the school site. In 1954, the school was closed and the students were vanned to Sexsmith. After this, there was some discussion on forming a separate school district in the Morningside area, but the school was built at Sexsmith. Teachers at Morningview included Mr. Stitts, Catharine Roach, Ruth Valentine, Temple Crawford, Lorna McKernan, Dorothy Morton, Mrs. Ozee, Miss Hennig, Miss Hill, Lorna McFarlane, Alice Schwan, Olive Arnegard, Clare Edlund, Miss Fisher, Martha Gudlaugson, Dorothy Kynaston, Mrs. Cooke, Mrs. J. Tracy, Elna Morgan and Mrs. Grumbly.The sub-series consists of correspondence between the school inspectors, Morningview school board, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. There is also an Annual Financial Statement from 1927. The photographs are of a white frame school and teacherage and a wood frame barn.
 
Morningview School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Morningview school house (district #3514) was built in the area south east of Sexsmith. When the school closed in 1954, students continued their schooling in Sexsmith.
Location: 0063.02.062.1
Morningview School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn and other outbuildings on the Morningview school property.
Location: 0063.02.062.2
Morningview Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Morningview school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.062.3
SubSeries 063.02.063Mountain Side School District 4494. — 1930-1960. — 4 cm of textual records.Mountain Side School served the farming area north and east of Saskatoon Mountain. The district was established in 1930 and a school site chosen on SE 25-72-9 W6th. To access money from a government grant, the ratepayers called a work-bee for February 26, 1931, and the frame school was erected by volunteers. A log barn was built in 1933 and a teacherage in 1935. Mr. Henry Wiebe was the first teacher and there were 28 children when school opened on May 4, 1931. Later teachers included Miss Elma Elkins, Miss Carr, Miss Mary Beard, Mr. Clarence Otterbein, Mr. Paul Poetker, Miss Olive Throness, Mrs. Agnes Hamm, Miss Tomshak, Miss Julia Podulski, and Roy Grimsrud. The school was closed in the late 1950s and students bussed to larger schools.The sub-series consists of correspondence between the school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.064Mountain Trail School District 4071. — 1930-1948. — 2 cm of textual records.Mountain Trail School was located at the bottom of Saskatoon Mountain on its south face, 5 miles east of Beaverlodge. The site contained a stable and outbuildings as well as the log school, at which grades 1-9 were taught. Elna Elkins was the first teacher, followed by Jessie Erskine in 1932, Elizabeth Willetts, Serena Otterbein, Beatrice Moir, Miss M. Feist, and Annie Proden, . Florence Russell taught from 1941-1943. The school was closed in 1944 and the school furnishings forwarded to Beaverlodge, the school district where the students would attend.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school board members, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.065Mount Saskatoon School District 4443. — 1928-1948. — 3 cm of textual records. — 1 maps. — 1 blueprints.Mount Saskatoon School was located north-east of Beaverlodge, four and one-half miles west of Mountain Side School. The district was organized in 1929, and on May 5, 1930 a special meeting was held to pass a motion that one thousand dollars be raised by way of debentures for erecting and equipping of the schoolhouse. Mount Saskatoon School opened c. 1930 with Frances Fisher as the first teacher. Other teachers included Marjorie McLaughlin, Thomas MacKenzie, Elma Buhler, Ingibjorg Jacobson, J. E. Fraser-Smith, Mrs. Wallace Clark, and Miss Hawthorne. When vanning the students to Beaverlodge was first suggested in 1939, a petition from the parents kept the school open. Unfortunately, later that year the school burned, with a complete loss of building and materials. It was re-built by Charles Turner and operated for about 10 more years, but it became increasingly difficult to find teachers and the school closed c. 1948.The sub-series consists of correspondence between the school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. It includes a 1928 map of the proposed district showing a fur farm, a detailed description of the materials used to build the 1930 school, and a detailed listing of the furnishings for insurance purposes after the school burned in 1939. The blueprint is a standard 1939 Twenty Four Pupil Rural School Plan produced by the Department of Education in Alberta.
 
24 Pupil Rural School Plan, Mount Saskatoon School District 4443, 1939
plan
School plan for 24 pupil rural school at Mount Saskatoon.
Location: 0063.02.065.1
Mount Saskatoon School District 4443, 1928
map
Map showing families in the school district.
Location: 0063.02.065.2
SubSeries 063.02.066Mount Star School District 3500. — 1929-1958. — 4 cm of textual records. — 5 photographs. — 2 blueprints.Mount Star School District #3500 was established in 1917, and classes were started that year in a rented building. The first school was built by volunteer labour in 1921, and burned down in 1939. A new school was built in 1939 and operated until 1955, when all the schools in the area were consolidated to Teepee Creek. Teachers at Mount Star included Margaret Johnson, Miss Mustard, Miss McLeod, Mrs. Brister, Miss Brown, Miss Patrick, Mrs. Oscar Mackey, Art Polley, Miss Luxton, Miss Horde, Mrs. Swahn, Mr. Carrico, Mr. Lomas, Mrs. Norden, Mrs. Roberts, Mrs. C. Ford, Mrs. F. Bolon, Mrs. Nicoll, Miss E. Willis, Emma Mae Wilson, Miss Chugg, Mary Tomshak, Annette Fraser, Eleanor Waeffler, Bernice Willis, Phyllis Luckey, and Donald Oke.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The blueprints are the standard Government of Alberta, Department of Education plan for a low-cost frame school for Pioneer and New Districts. The Mount Star plans include a flagpole detail. The photographs are of a white frame school with a “Mount Star School” nameplate beside the front door, the teacherage, the barn and a log corral and pole shed.
 
Mount Star School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Mount Star school house (district #3500) was built in 1939 and operated until 1955 when it, and the other schools in the area, were consolidated to Teepee Creek.
Location: 0063.02.066.1
Mount Star Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Mount Star school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.066.2
Mount Star School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
“Old north sexsmith barn” is written on the back of this photograph of a Mount Star School Barn.
Location: 0063.02.066.3
Mount Star Pole Shed, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
An old pole shed at Mount Star School.
Location: 0063.02.066.4
Mount Star Buildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Mount Star School Barn stands in the foreground with the pole shed in the distence.
Location: 0063.02.066.5
 
Closed Porch for Low-Cost Frame School, 1939
blueprint
Plan and south, west and north elevations.
Location: 0063.02.066.1
Low-Cost Frame School Plan for Pioneer and New Districts, 1938
blueprint
Plans, elevations, details for walls, doors, windows, blackboards, partitions, cupboards.
Location: 0063.02.066.2
SubSeries 063.02.067North Badheart School District 4369. — 2 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs. — 2 blueprints.North Badheart School District #4369 was formed in 1949 when the Badheart School burned down and the district was divided into north and south. An existing building was moved in from Odin District and served as the North Badheart School until 1955, when all schools in the area were consolidated at TeePee Creek. Teachers at North Badheart were Florence Nail and Elsie Boyd.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education. The blueprints are the standard Government of Alberta, Department of Education plan for a low-cost frame school for Pioneer and New Districts. A closed porch plan is included.
 
North Badheart School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The North Badheart School District (#4369) was formed in 1949 and the school house (a building moved from Odin District) served until 1955 when all the schools in the area were consolidated at TeePee Creek.
Location: 0063.02.067.1
North Badheart Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The teacherage for the North Badheart school.
Location: 0063.02.067.2
North Badheart School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
Outbuildings on the North Badheart school property.
Location: 0063.02.067.3
 
Closed Porch for Low-Cost Frame School, 1939
blueprint
Plan and south, west and north elevations.
Location: 0063.02.067.1
Low-Cost Frame School Plan for Pioneer and New Districts, 1938
blueprint
Plans, elevations, details for walls, doors, windows, blackboards, partitions, cupboards.
Location: 0063.02.067.2
SubSeries 063.02.068North Beaverlodge School District 3524. — 1931-1955. — 3 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.North Beaverlodge School was located in the Albright area between Hythe and Beaverlodge. The school opened in 1918, with Miss Nellie Robson (Mrs. Healing) as the first teacher. The site contained a standard frame school, teacherage, barn and outbuildings. In 1934 a PTA Association was started, and in 1941 an addition was added to the teacherage. The last year of operations was in 1954, and in 1955 the buildings were sold. Students from the North Beaverlodge District then attended Beaverlodge School. Teachers at North Beaverlodge included Catherine Craig, Margaret Simpson, Emma Bricker, Constance Aitkenhead, Edwin Nepstad, Garth Eggenberger, Kathleen Robson, Isabel Perry, Mrs. W. Halstead, Jean Smith, Irma Toth, Joyce McLean, Mrs. A.N. Jenner, Lydia Griffin, and Audrey Sutherland as the last teacher.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The photographs are of a white frame school, a white frame teacherage, and a large shed-roofed barn.
 
North Beaverlodge School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The North Beaverlodge school house (district #3524) was located in the Albright area between Hythe and Beaverlodge. The school closed in 1954 and the students continued their schooling at the school in Beaverlodge.
Location: 0063.02.068.1
North Beaverlodge Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The teacherage at the North Beaverlodge school.
Location: 0063.02.068.2
North Beaverlodge School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the North Beaverlodge school property.
Location: 0063.02.068.3
SubSeries 063.02.069North Equity School District 4821. — 1939-1952. — 1 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.North Equity School District was established north-west of Sexsmith in 1938 when the numbers in the Equity School became too high for a one-room school. North Equity School was built in 1939 on NW 28-74-6 W6, and in 1940 the district became part of the Grande Prairie School Division No. 14. Mr. Adair was the first teacher and Mrs. Coleman taught in 1941-1943. Supervisors in later years included Nellie Hriskow, Gordon Badger, Gordon Steinke, and Miss McKinney. The old North Equity school was moved to Sexsmith c. 1950, and sold in 1954.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The photographs are of old North Equity school, a white frame building 30 x 30 feet, with a small porch on the side.
 
North Equity School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The North Equity school house (district #4821) was built in 1939 on NW 28-74-6 W6 and later became part of the Grande Prairie School Division No. 14 in 1940. When the school was closed, in the 1950’s, it was moved to Sexsmith.
Location: 0063.02.069.1
North Equity School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The North Equity school house (district #4821) was built in 1939 on NW 28-74-6 W6 and later became part of the Grande Prairie School Division No. 14 in 1940. When the school was closed, in the 1950’s, it was moved to Sexsmith.
Location: 0063.02.069.2
SubSeries 063.02.070North Kleskun School District 3750. — 1930-1956. — 3 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.North Kleskun School District was established in 1918, and school was taught in a borrowed building for the first four years in summer sessions from April to Christmas. The teachers for these “summer sessions” were Miss Moodie, Miss Lively, Mr. Allison and Stanley Ward. In 1923 a new school was built on SW 10-74-4-W6, and Miss Johnson was teacher that fall. Later teachers were Mrs. Wade, Margaret Lawson, Miss Boyd, Elsie Young, Florence Donald, Gordon Stewart, Christine Mackey, Mrs. Barrette, G.L. O’Grady, Amy Cochrane, Margaret Vinet, A. Weatherup, Doris Austin, Annie Pundyk, Rev. G. Pearce, Phyllis Clarke, Dennis McIntosh, William Adair and Esther Beck. North Kleskun closed in 1955, when the country schools in the area were centralized to Teepee Creek.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. Included in this is a North Alberta Land Registration Certificate for NW-3-74-4 W6th. The photographs are of a white frame school with “North Kleskun School” name plate on the side, the teacherage and the school barn.
 
North Kleskun School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The North Kelskun school house was built in 1923 on SW 10-74-4 W6 and closed in 1955, when the country school is the area were centralized to Teepee Creek.
Location: 0063.02.070.1
North Kleskun Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The North Kelskun teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.070.2
North Kleskun School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn situated on the North Kelskun school property.
Location: 0063.02.070.3
SubSeries 063.02.071North Sexsmith School District 3637. — 1929-1948. — 1 cm of textual records.North Sexsmith School was organized in the early twenties and first taught in a rented cabin. A log school was built by volunteer labour on the N.E. corner of Don Coleman’s homestead. Grades one to nine were taught, with some students from neighbouring districts coming for grade nine. Teachers at North Sexsmith included William Hendrix, Miss Hill, Milton McLeod, Miss Cobb, Helen Foy, Mona Foy, Gordon Stewart, Margaret Bittorf (Mrs. G. Lowe), Muriel (Don) Coleman, Lillian McFarlane, Ethel Drury, Mary Trenemon, Francis Young, Muriel Bradley, E.B. Parker-Nordon, Jean D. McNaughton, Virginia Housman, Mrs. M. R. Tracie, Marion Heller, B. Vik, Shirley Cooksley, Shirley Gammon, and Jean Housman. North Sexsmith School closed under consolidation in 1947 and students were vanned to Sexsmith.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.072Odin School District 4318. — 1930-1949. — 2 cm of textual records.Odin School District was established in 1928 and classes taught in vacant buildings until the school was built in 1931. Alberdina Ganzeveld was the first teacher, followed by Miss McRae, Dorcas Macklin, Edwin Nepstad, Martha Henning, Rachael King (Dolemo), Bertha Meen, Miss Mosand, Alice Dalen, Miss Branchflower, Miss Ruptash and Mr. & Mrs. Cook. In 1943 a teacherage was built. The school operated until 1949, when the children were bussed to Valhalla Centre or LaGlace and the school building was moved to Teepee Creek.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, parents, teachers, the school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.073Old Post School District 4862. — 1939-1954. — 2 cm of textual records. — 1 blueprints.The Old Post District was located south west of the hamlet of LaGlace, on S. 29-73-8 W6. It was organized in 1940 and the school opened in 1941 with Florence Smith (Wales) as the first teacher. Only two other teachers taught at Old Post: Agnes Kinderwater and Lillian Lowe. In 1949 the school closed and the students were bussed to LaGlace. The school house was moved to the Blooming Valley Hall site. The district was the site of the first Hudson’s Bay Company fur trading post, hence the name “Old Post.”The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, parents, teachers, the school division and the Department of Education.
 
Low-Cost Frame School Plan for Pioneer and New Districts, 1950 c.
blueprint
Plans, elevations, details for walls, doors, windows, blackboards, partitions, cupboards.
Location: 0063.02.073.1
SubSeries 063.02.074Pendleton School District 4737. — 1939-1950. — 1 cm of textual records.Pendleton School opened in September, 1937 and closed in 1950 when the children were vanned to Goodfare Consolidated No. 4314. The school was built of logs and located on S.W. 29-72-11 W6. Pendleton School was named after Mr. Grant Pendleton, an old gentleman who lived alone close to the school site. Teachers who taught at Pendleton School No. 4737 were Ethel Denmark, Ada Fletcher, Art Fletcher, Lydia Pryko, Eleanor Wilson, Mrs. Morse, Beatrice Juneau, Gladys Park, and Eleanor Wilson.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.075Percy School District 3031. — 1929-1962. — 2 cm of textual records.Percy School was located near Dimsdale, south of Bear Lake on the N.E. 25-71-7 W6. It opened c. 1929 and closed c. 1957. The site contained a frame school, teacherage, barn and outbuildings. Teachers included Mary Crawford, Claude Cavett, Marie Poppen, Alfred Aldridge, Royal Hughson, E.J. Meen, May Ward, Noreen Ford, Winnifred Gerry, Florence Sedore, and Bessie Grumbly. The school site and buildings were sold to Mr. Nordhagen in 1961.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school board, teachers, parents, school division, and the department of Education. It includes a 1940-41 Price List and Requisition form for the School-Book Branch of the Government of Alberta Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.076Pipestone Creek School District 4798. — 1937-1965. — 3 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.In 1933, residents of the Pipestone Creek District began the process to form a school district of their own, separate from the Millarston District where their children attended. This became a reality in 1937 and a site for the Pipestone Creek School was approved on NE 22-70-8 W6. In 1938, they began holding classes in a rented cabin with Cathy Ross as teacher. This building would serve as the school until 1944 under teachers Hilda Bland, Maud Reinhart, Olga Lacusta, and Belle Wallace. A small cottage beside the Pipestone Creek Store served as the teacherage. From 1944-1948, due to the shortage of teachers, the students were vanned to Millarston. In 1948, the old school re-opened and students were taught by Ingebjorg Olsson, Sonja Stamp, June Dowling and Pearl Lester. In 1952, the student population was still at 30, so the old Buffalo Lakes school was moved in. Teachers were Gladys Omlid, Florence Russell and Clara Knutson. The school was finally closed in 1957 and the students bussed to Wembley.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. Photographs are of a frame school house identified as the old Buffalo Lakes School and a log building, which was the first school and became the teacherage in 1952.
 
Pipestone Creek School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
Pipestone Creek School (district #4798) was built in 1937. Due to a small amount of student population, 30, the Old Buffalo Lakes School moved into the building in 1952. When the school was finally closed in 1957 the students were bussed to Wembley.
Location: 0063.02.076.1
SubSeries 063.02.077Preston Lake School District 4557. — 1930-1961. — 6 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.The first classes of Preston Lake School were taught in Thor Johanson’s home in 1931, with Mrs. Light as the first teacher. Community members agreed to build a new school in 1932. A frame building was decided upon and each settler was to donate two weeks worth of labour. The school opened that fall without any debts. Mrs. Ed Bolt was a teacher in the new school for several years. Preston Lake School was closed in 1955 and the students were bussed to Lambert School. In 1960, when Lambert School closed, the students were then bussed to Hythe.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school board, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. Photographs are of a white frame building and a log barn.
 
Preston Lake School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Preston Lake school house (district #4557) was built in 1932 and when it closed in 1955, the students were bussed to Lambert School.
Location: 0063.02.077.1
Preston Lake School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Preston Lake school property.
Location: 0063.02.077.2
SubSeries 063.02.078Ravenswood School District 4463. — 1929-1957. — 4 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs. — 2 maps.Although the first meeting of ratepayers to form the Ravenswood School District was held in 1929, and the district formed in 1930, no school was in existence until 1937. The district covered Township 69, Range 11, West of the 6th, and the school site was located on the north-west corner of 15-69-11 W6, about 21 miles southwest of Beaverlodge. Here the trustees decided to build a log school and a school barn. The first temporary school opened in 1937 at a ratepayers house until completion of the new log school. The first teacher was Robert Ramsay, followed by Edith Lechelt. Ravenswood School was closed c. 1957.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education. There are also 2 maps of the district and an assessment list. The photographs are of a delapitated log school and barn taken in the late 50s.
 
Ravenswood School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Ravenswood school house (district #4463) was built on NW 15-69-11 W6 and closed in the late 1950’s.
Location: 0063.02.078.1
Ravenswood School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Ravenswood school property.
Location: 0063.02.078.2
 
Ravenswood School District No.4463, 1936
map
Hand drawn land plan of the District
Location: 0063.02.078.1
Ravenswood School District No. 4463, 1936
assessment list
List of ratepayers, land description, assessed value, and No. of Acres in crop
Location: 0063.02.078.2
Ravenswood School District 4463, 1930
land plan
hand-drawn plan of where families were located in the school district
Location: 0063.02.078.3
SubSeries 063.02.079Ray Lake School District 4442. — 1928-1963. — 8 cm of textual records. — 4 photographs.Ray Lake School was located in the middle of the Ray Lake District, a log school with dove-tailed corners built by volunteers. The Ray Lake School opened for classes in 1931 and closed in 1958 when the children were vanned to the Hythe. Ray Lake School had the following teachers: first teacher Alberta Spitzmesser, Olivia Patterson, Violet Scott, Miss Macomber, Effie Davidson, Jack Cheal, Jack Lewis, Mildred Hill, Joyce Lang, Mrs. Riddel, Mrs. Simmons, Mrs. Reinhart, Miss McNamee, and Ada Schwietzer. As well, there were two substitute teachers, Beryl McCauley and Roger Jones, during the war years.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education. Two of the photographs, taken in the late 50’s, show an old log school with a built-on frame porch and a dilapidated log barn. The other two photographs are of the later white frame school and a two-room teacherage.
 
Old Ray Lake School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Ray Lake school house was built in 1931 and when it closed in 1958 the students continued their schooling at Hythe.
Location: 0063.02.079.1
Old Ray Lake School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Ray Lake school property.
Location: 0063.02.079.2
Ray Lake School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The second Ray Lake school. In 1958 when the school closed, the students continued their schooling at Hythe.
Location: 0063.02.079.3
Ray Lake Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Ray Lake school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.079.4
SubSeries 063.02.080Rio Grande School District. — 1929-1952. — 2 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs. — 1 maps.Rio Grande School was organized in 1918, with community volunteers building the log school that winter. The school was located on SE 5-71-11-w6th, 18 miles southwest of the town of Beaverlodge. Annual school meetings were noted by the rivalries between Catholic and Orangemen settlers. The first teacher was May Embrie (Carbett), followed by Miss MacDonnell, Jessie Reddic, Nora Shook, Edna Fraser, Belle Brocky, Jean McGillivary, Gladys Jamieson (Mills), Cliff Lee, Avery Kenny and Frank Bullis. Local young people such as Lawrence Ozust, Peggy Martin, Margaret Gould, Stella Holtz and Dorothy Edgerton kept the school open when teachers were not available. When bussing to Elmworth school became available, Rio Grande School closed for good.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. There is also a hand-drawn land plan showing the families in the district c. 1929. The photographs, taken in the 50s, show a well-constructed log school and a newer frame barn.
 
Rio Grande School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Rio Grande school house was built on SE 5-71-11 and when the school closed in the early 1950’s, the students were bussed to Elmworth school.
Location: 0063.02.080.1
Rio Grande School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn located on the Rio Grande school property.
Location: 0063.02.080.2
 
Rio Grande School District 3657, 1929
land plan
hand-drawn plan showing families in the school district
Location: 0063.02.080.1
SubSeries 063.02.081Riversvale School District 4775. — 1938-1947. — 1 cm of textual records.Riversvale School District was located south of Aspen Ridge and Aspen Dale School Districts just north of Wapiti River. The first meeting of the Riversvale School Trustees was held on June 14, 1937, when they agreed to purchase four acres from R.L. Jones on the northwest corner of SW 6-70-9 W6 for the school site. A house was purchased from an estate to be used as a school. Riversvale School operated for three years, from 1937-1940. Alice Hittinger was the teacher when the school closed and students were sent to outlying districts. The buildings sold in 1946.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.082Rivertop School District 4371. — 1929-1959. — 4 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.In March 1929, the Department of Education granted $1000 for the building of a new school in the Rivertop District, so named was it was just was on the top of the banks of the Smoky River. The school was built by volunteer labour–a two story log building with quarters upstairs for the teacher. It opened in September 1929. Margaret Miles was the first teacher, followed by Waldo Roppel, Myrtle Whaley, Harold Richards, T. Schoefield, Bev Joslin, R. Mellott, Bert Harrison, Bessie Grumbly, Jeanette Vinet, William Adair, Miss Fribel, Nellie Albinati, and Jim Courtney. In 1955, Rivertop School closed permanently and all the pupils were bussed to the centralized school at Teepee Creek.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education. Photographs, taken in 1954, are of a newer shed-roofed school, the original large log school and teacherage and a barn/woodshed.
 
Rivertop School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Rivertop school house (district #4371) was at the top of the Smoky River banks. The school closed permanently in 1955 and the students were bussed to the centralized school at Teepee Creek.
Location: 0063.02.082.1
Rivertop School and Outbuildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The original Rivertop school house (district #4371) was built in 1929.
Location: 0063.02.082.2
Rivertop School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Rivertop school property.
Location: 0063.02.082.3
SubSeries 063.02.083Royal Banner School District 3788. — 1928-1966. — 5 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Construction began on the Royal Banner School in the spring of 1930. The school was located on S.W. 9-74-10-6, 4 miles southwest of Valhalla Centre. It opened in September 1930, with 16 students and Mr. Norman Floen as the first teacher. Royal Banner School operated for about twenty-five years before closing down when the children were bussed to Valhalla Centre. The following teachers taught at Royal Banner School over the years: Norman Floen, Ruth Frost, Mrs. Oscar Johnson, Clara Jerstad, Agnes Kinderwater, Bert Nickolson, Vera Ruptash, Mr. MacNamee, Mrs. Macrae, Vera Severson, and Mrs. Harry Sullivan.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. There is also a land plan of the Royal Banner School District. Photographs, taken in the 50s, are of white frame school with an attached two-room teacherage, and the outbuildings on the property—an outhouse and a log barn.
 
Royal Banner School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Royal Banner school house (district #3788) was built in 1930 on SW 9-74-10-6. The school closed down about twenty-five years later and the students were bussed to Valhalla Centre to continue their schooling.
Location: 0063.02.083.1
Royal Banner School Outbuildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn and outhouse situated on the Royal Banner school property.
Location: 0063.02.083.2
 
Royal Banner School District,
land plan
hand-drawn plan showing location of school and families in district
Location: 0063.02.083.1
SubSeries 063.02.084Saskatoon Lake School District 2518, 3550 and 56. — 1929-1958. — 8 cm of textual records.The first school at Saskatoon Lake (#2518) was built on NW 14-72-8-W6th in 1913, two miles out of Lake Saskatoon Town. It was also known as the Cutbank Lake school. Mr. Charles Higbee, husband of Dr. Annie Higbee, was the first teacher. Later teachers included Mr. E. Hockey, Marion McNaught, Miss Collette, Mr. Ferris, Miss Fraser, Louise Trelle, Wilhamena Pearcy, Mrs. Joe Boyd, John McNaught, Miss Lawrence, and Nettie Sharpe. Another district, #3550, was organized for the Village of Saskatoon Lake, on the west side of the lake. Saskatoon Lake Consolidated School District #56 was formed in 1918 when the Saskatoon Village School District #3550 and Saskatoon Lake School District #2518 were consolidated. Horse drawn vans brought the children in from the surrounding district. Trustees of Saskatoon Lake School District #56 were made up of representatives of both the Village and Lake school districts. Consolidation was considered justified because high school could then be taught at Lake Saskatoon. A vacant grist mill was renovated to create a school near the shores of Lake Saskatoon. There was a main school room on the lower floor, an upper floor for teacher’s living quarters school, and an addition for the high school. Teachers at the school included Mr. & Mrs. Patullo, Miss MacGilvary, Miss Irving, Mr. Jones, Miss Mary Donahue (Mrs. Jack Third), John McNaught, Isabel, McNaught, Marion McNaught, Miss Gladys Lawrence, Miss Vera Hadigan, and Miss Ruth Rutherford. In 1929, Banner Builders (Stacey & Knight) erected a modern two-room school on the north side of the lake. Two rooms upstairs were for grades 1-6 and 7-11; the basement provided living quarters for teachers. The first teachers at the new school were Mr. & Mrs. Jack Third. Later teachers included Mr. & Mrs. E.A. Brickman, William & Edna B. Parker Nordon, Howard and Jack Minchin, Iva Carrell, Betty Hodges, Shirley Carter, Florence Lantinga, Anne Dyck, Marion Harland, Colleen Martin, Noreen Ford, Alice Wood, Elsaida Magee, Mrs. Nettie Wood, Willie Taylor, Miss Avis Reynolds, Mrs. Alberdina Wilson, Mrs. Alice Drysdale, Mr. & Mrs. Glen Lett, Mr. & Mrs. Harry Sherk and Mrs. Lillian Lowe. In September of 1954, the elementary school children were transferred to Wembley, but the high school remained open for the remainder of the year. In January 1955, the high school also was transferred to Wembley and the Lake Saskatoon school was sold to George Cooper.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, the school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.085St. John’s Lutheran School. — 1957-1962. — 0.1 cm of textual records.St. John’s Parochial Lutheran School opened in 1928, the first parochial school in the Peace River district. It was located in the rural Wembley district and 33 pupils were enrolled when it began. The school house was a log building which served both as school and church. The first teachers were pastors or candidates for the ministry. All nine grades were taught at St. John’s and often enrollment was as high as 45 pupils. St. John’s Parochial Lutheran School closed in 1961 when teachers became scarce and consolidation was necessary. The school still stands at its original site as an historical monument.The sub-series consists of a small amount of correspondence between St. John’s and School Division No. 14 regarding ordering of curriculum and books, and bussing the students on County busses. It includes a 1960-61 Price List and Order Form for the School Book Branch of the Department of Education in the Province of Alberta.
SubSeries 063.02.086Sexsmith School District 3600. — 1952-1965. — 6 cm of textual records. — 1 blueprints.Sexsmith School District #3600 was organized in 1918 with Mrs. Nettie Hale Ozzee as the teacher. She was followed by A. MacAlister, Kathryn Mallory, Kate Ballou, Meta Lively, and W.D. McDougall. In 1922, a second room was added to the school by renting Shannon’s Hall, and from that time, two teachers were employed. By 1938, a Senior High School Room was added for high school students, and by 1950, the school had taken over four buildings, with a total of six rooms. North Sexsmith School had closed in 1948, and students from other rural schools also swelled the student numbers. With consolidation in the early 50s, Sexsmith became a central school and in 1955, a multi-roomed facility of eight classrooms, typing room, science room, was built. In 1956, the Sexsmith School District joined the County of Grande Prairie School Division #14.The sub-series consists of later correspondence records between the school division and Sexsmith School District with school census, principals’ and teachers’ reports, financial statements and health unit reports as well as more general correspondence. The blueprint is a 1939 standard Department of Education plan for a Closed Porch.
SubSeries 063.02.087Sexsmith Separate School District 51. — 1961. — 0.1 cm of textual records.Sexsmith Separate School District #51 was established in 1955 when Sister Joseph Austin and Sister Patricia began teaching at the old Sexsmith High School. In 1956, St. Mary’s School was officially opened with Sister Joseph Austin as principal. During the years 1955 to 1966, grades one to eleven were taught at St. Mary”s. This was reduced to grades one through nine in the fall of 1966.The sub-series consists of correspondence regarding students from the outlying districts attending Sexmith Separate School.
SubSeries 063.02.088Sinclair Lake School District 4370. — 1930-1954. — 4 cm of textual records. — 1 blueprints.Organization of the Sinclair Lake School District was initiated in 1928, and school opened in a borrowed building in the spring of 1929. Sinclair Lake School was built that summer and opened in September 1929; soon a barn was added to the site. Although financing the school throughout the depression was difficult and School Board meetings were marked by strife and dissention, somehow they kept the school open. Sometimes the teacher moved from home to home as taxpayers provided room and board to pay off taxes, and at one point the teacher was a farmer in the district paying off his taxes through teaching so they didn’t have to pay a salary. Sinclair Lake School Board dissolved itself in 1940 after the formation of Grande Prairie School Division #14. The school itself remained open until consolidation c. 1950. Some of the teachers at Sinclair Lake School were Norma Grover, R.A. Hill, Mrs. Leitch, Roy Berlet, and Miss Hines.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The blueprint is for a closed porch on a Low Cost Frame School c. 1939.
 
Closed Porch for L.C.F. Plan, 1939
blueprint
Plan and south, west and north elevation
Location: 0063.02.088.1
SubSeries 063.02.089Somme School District 3634. — 1930-1961. — 4 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Somme School District was located north-east of Grande Prairie. Classes began in the little log church that had been built by the Presbyterians in 1915. The School opened in 1928 with Bill Gutierrez as teacher. In 1930, a new school was built, complete with a fenced schoolyard, swings, teeters and a school barn. Somme School closed under consolidation in 1956.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The photographs, taken in the 50s, show a white frame school house and the outbuildings on the property – various sheds, barn and outhouses.
 
Somme School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Somme school house (district #3634) was built in 1930 north-east of Grande Prairie and was closed with consolidation in 1956.
Location: 0063.02.089.1
Somme School Outbuildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
Various sheds, a barn and outhouses on the Somme school property.
Location: 0063.02.089.2
SubSeries 063.02.090South Bad Heart School District 4369. — 1948-1960. — 2 cm of textual records. — 4 photographs.South Bad Heart School District was formed in 1949 when the Bad Heart School burned down and the district was divided into north and south. People of the district volunteered their labour to build a new frame school that was used until 1955 when all the schools in the area were consolidated at Teepee Creek.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education. The photographs are of a white frame school with large side porch and “South Badheart School” name plate on porch. There is also a white frame teacherage, barn, out house and shed.
 
South Badheart School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The South Badheart school house (district #4369) was built after the Bad Heart School burned down in 1949 and was used until 1955 when all the schools in the area were consolidated at Teepee Creek.
Location: 0063.02.090.1
South Badheart Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The South Badheart school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.090.2
South Badheart School Outbuildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn and outhouse on the South Badheart school property.
Location: 0063.02.090.3
South Badheart School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the South Badheart school property.
Location: 0063.02.090.4
SubSeries 063.02.091South Wapiti School District 4623. — 1933-1958. — 2 cm of textual records.South Wapiti School District was formed in 1933, the first district south of the Wapiti River. The school was built of logs on the N.E. quarter of 8-69-8 W6th; the site also eventually had a teacherage, ice house and barn. School opened in May 1935, with Miss Harkness as the first teacher, and operated as a summer school for the first two years. Later teachers were Mr. A. Dormer, Gladys Moore, Belle Wallace and Anna Day. Muriel Sutherland and May Ryan were supervisors when teachers could not be hired. The district became part of Grande Prairie School Division No. 14 in 1938 and remained in the division until the formation of the County system. Because South Wapiti was outside the County, it was operated as an Independent District with official trustees. In 1954 a new school was built and was used until 1962, when the school was consolidated with Grovedale School. The last teachers at South Wapiti were Joe Stevenson, Connie Miller, Violet Nichol, Mrs. Barker, Mr. Adair and Elke Egge.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. It includes a Transfer of Land Certificate from 1942.
SubSeries 063.02.092Southwell School District 4470. — 1929-1959. — 3 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Southwell School was named after Arthur Southwell, one of the early settlers in the Hythe area. It was built of logs in 1929 on the southwest corner of S.W. 1-73-12 W6. The following teachers taught at Southwell School over the years: Mr. Platzer, Ruth Conley; Olive Simmons, Laura Woods, Mary Scott, Peggy Martin, Kay Ross, Gladys Park, and Pearl Lester who was a supervisor. After consolidation the students from Southwell were bussed to school in Hythe.The sub-series consists of of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The photographs, taken in the 50s, are of a log school house with frame porch and an unpainted frame barn.
 
Southwell School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Southwell school house (district #4470) was built in 1929 on the south-west corner of SW 1-73-12 W6 and was named after the Arthur Southwell family who were early settlers in the district.
Location: 0063.02.092.1
Southwell School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Southwell school property.
Location: 0063.02.092.2
SubSeries 063.02.093Steeprock School District 4499. — 1930-1954. — 5 cm of textual records.Steeprock School was opened on December 15, 1933. The log school was located on N.W. 30-72-12 W6 and was named after the Steeprock Creek. The first teacher was Mrs. Emma Bricker. She was followed over the years were Gladys Park, Mr. A. W. Fletcher, Roy Berlett, Frank Toews, John Lacusta, Emma Bricker, Connie Hodges, Florence Fletcher, Mrs. Mills, Miss Burgess, Merve Unger, Ada Schweitzer, and Sadie Tanchuk. In 1950 the school closed and students were bussed to school in Goodfare.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. It includes a hand-drawn map of the district showing the families there in 1943.
SubSeries 063.02.094Sylvester School District 4599. — 1936-1954. — 1 cm of textual records.Sylvester School was one of the three schools which served the area south and west of Elmworth, the other two being Beaverbrook and Itipaw. The teacher at Sylvester from 1936-1938 was Beverly Macomber. The school closed c. 1938 and the students were transferred to nearby schools.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school.trustees, teachers, parents, school division, the Department of Education and the Department of Municipal Affairs. It includes some financial statements and records, a tax roll from 1933 and a standard form of contract between trustees and teacher dated 1936.
SubSeries 063.02.095Teepee Creek School District 3911. — 1930-1959. — 10 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs. — 1 maps.Teepee Creek School was established in 1920 and opened in a one room log school building. The first teacher was Mr. William Adair. A school site was approved in 1922 on the southwest corner of the S.E. 16-74-3 W6. In October of 1937, Teepee Creek School District was included in Subdivision 2 of the Grande Prairie School Division # 14. Some of the teachers at Teepee Creek School over the years were Mr. Gillies, Ann Lempky, Winona Howell, Dora Looker, Bill Maxwell, Rene Ashley, Wilhelmina Gillies, Norman Floen, Margaret Vinet, Mrs. Ann Mackey, R.L. Williams, Bert Harrison, Annette Fraser, Phyllis Johnson, and Muriel Stewart. The school house burned down on the second last day of school in 1938. Thus, in the fall of 1938, classes were held in Bennett’s house one half mile east of the school site until a new school was built. In 1955, a new consolidated school was built and included the surrounding districts of Bad Heart, Rivertop, Tranquility, Webster Trail, and North Kleskun.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. Photographs are of a log barn and a white frame school.
 
Teepee Creek School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Teepee Creek consolidated school (district #3911) was built in 1955 and included the surrounding districts of Badheart, Rivertop, Tranquility, Webster Trail, and North Kleskun.
Location: 0063.02.095.1
Teepee Creek School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Teepee Creek school property.
Location: 0063.02.095.2
 
Land plan for Teepee Creek School District, 1950 c.
land plan
showing names of families and current and prospective students in the Teepee Creek School district
Location: 0063.02.095.1
SubSeries 063.02.096Torun School District 4483. — 1930-1962. — 5 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.By 1929, there were about 42 families of Polish origin settled in the Webster area. The first community project was the building of the church. School classes were held in the front part of the church while awaiting the completion of the school building. The school building was completed by volunteer labour and named after Torun, Poland, the hometown of local pioneers. The first teacher was Miss Platzer who, with a student body of only Polish-speaking students, did not speak a word of Polish. Other teachers who taught at Webster were Agnes Moran, Ellen Bolt, Tony Wacowich, Miss Warblowsky, Beatrice Hodges, June Whitecotton, Martha Gitzel, Kathleen Johnson, Margaret Gorynuik, Mervyn Unger, Ingrid Peaerson, Grace Cook, Olga Oskoboiny, Clara Knutson, Donald Oke and Elvera Grotkowski. A teacherage was added in 1936 but it was swept away by a torrential rain. In 1954, the first school was sold and the Old Twilight school moved on site. Torun school closed in 1957, and the students were vanned to Sexsmith.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The photographs show a log barn, an abandoned, unpainted, wood frame school and a newer school in good condition identified as the Old Twilight School.
 
Old Twilight School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Old Twilight school house moved on site of the Torun school property (district #4495) in 1954. The school closed in 1957 and the students continued their schooling at Sexsmith.
Location: 0063.02.096.1
Torun School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The original Torun school house (district #4483) was built in the late 1920’s in the Webster area and was replaced by the old Twilight school in 1954. The Torun School is named after the hometown of local pioneers: Torun, Poland.
Location: 0063.02.096.2
Torun School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Torun school property.
Location: 0063.02.096.3
SubSeries 063.02.097Tranquility School District 4495. — 1930-1956. — 4 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Tranquility School District was located between the Smoky River and Kleskun Lake, with East Kleskun School District to the south and Teepee Creek School District to the north. It was established in 1930, and a school house built on the corner of SW 30-73-3-6 on the south side of Kleskun Creek. The name Tranquility was chosen at the foundational meeting because it was a warm peaceful day. Miss Annie Graham was the first teacher with school opening Jan. 5, 1931. In 1932 a 16 x 24 ft. barn was built. Tranquility School was closed down for the school year in 1933-34 due to lack of funds. The students went to Fitzsimmons School for that year, and Tranquility re-opened September 4, 1934. In 1955, centralization closed the school permanently.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. Two photographs, taken in 1954, show a white frame school and a red frame barn.
 
Tranquility School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Tranquility school house (district #4495) was built in 1930 on the corner of SW 30-73-3-6 on the south side of Kleskun Creek and was closed permanently with centralization in 1955. The name Tranquility was chosen because the foundational meeting took place on a warm and peaceful day.
Location: 0063.02.097.1
Tranquility School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Tranquility school property.
Location: 0063.02.097.2
SubSeries 063.02.098Twilight School District 4417. — 1930-1953. — 1 cm of textual records.Twilight School District was formed in 1929 when the population of the Five Mile Creek School District became too much for a one-room school, and 16 sections in Range 5, Townships 71 & 72 were sub-divided to create a new district. Debentures were issued, tenders were requested, and the school built. It opened right after New Year’s 1930. Charles A. Cromie was the first teacher. To reduce expenses in the 1930s, each family donated a load of firewood and a work bee was held to saw it. The teachers who taught at Twilight were Charles Cromie, Maud Nowlin, Gerald White, William Porteous, Ann Mix, Ethel Meyer, Bernice Beveridge, Irene Lewis, Mrs. Morris, Jean Westendorf, Mary Nicholychuk, Mary Roberts, Shirley Colton, Dorothy Rehaume, and Isabel Moodie. In 1950, Twilight school was taken over by the Divisional School Board and the children bussed to Grande Prairie. In 1952, the school was moved to the Torun District near Webster.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.099Two Rivers School District 3497. — 1930-1963. — 2 cm of textual records. — 2 photographs.Two Rivers School District was situated in the triangle formed by the confluence of the Red Willow and Beaverlodge rivers, 9 miles south of the town of Beaverlodge. It was formed in 1917 and a school built in 1918. The first teacher was Verna Elliott, followed by William Sherry. The school was shut down for the duration of the first World War and students vanned to Lower Beaverlodge. The school re-opened in 1927, with Rita Cleland as teacher. Other teachers included Myrtle Dryer, Doris Irvine, Marion Dixon, Kae Chekaluk, Mrs. McNab, Doris Vernon, Edna Humphrey, Isabel Perry, Mrs. Halstead, Mrs. Ron Morris, and Florence Russell, who was the last teacher. A barn was added to the site in 1933, and a teacherage in 1943. The school was also added to in 1947, but in 1953 the school was closed and the students bussed to Beaverlodge.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school. boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. Two photographs show an unpainted frame shed/barn, and a white frame school with an addition.
 
Two Rivers School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Two Rivers school house (district #3497) was built in 1918 and when it closed in 1953, the students were bussed to Beaverlodge.
Location: 0063.02.099.1
Two Rivers School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Two Rivers school barn was built in 1933.
Location: 0063.02.099.2
SubSeries 063.02.100Valhalla School District 3130. — 1929-1959. — 11 cm of textual records. — 5 photographs. — 1 maps. — 1 blueprints.Valhalla School began in Olaf Horte’s house in 1914 with Nelius Ronning as the first teacher. In the summer of 1915, community members built a new school on S.W. 18- 74- 9 W6. This new school opened just after New Year in 1916 with Alvie Baycroft as teacher. Other teacherrs included Chester Ronning, Miss Sigrid Hommy, Mrs. A. S. Todd and Miss M. Erickson. In 1925-26, the Valhalla School Board included Molde School pupils and a second room was needed. In 1929, the school reverted back to one room, but in about 1943, a two room school was built. With the closing of the one-room country schools, Valhalla School became a central facility. Three rooms were opened in 1951, and in 1954, a six room school was erected about one quarter of a mile east of the original log schoolhouse. The following teachers have also taught at the Valhalla School during these years were Judd Perry, Tillie Torgerson, John Paul, Mr. R. Leitch, Mr. E.A. Keeping, Edna Small, Ferne Rideout, Mr. And Mrs. J.A. Pattullo, Stella M. Becker, Mr. R. A. Hill, Agnes Melsness, Ruth Axelson, Stella Gilkyson, Elizabeth Baker, Mary Gray and Lorna Horte.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. The photographs are of 2 white frame schools identified as the Old Northfield School and the Old “Old Post” School, a cement constructed shed roofed school, a modern multi-roomed school and the out buildings of barn and outhouse. There are also two “maps,” a hand-drawn one showing the location of families in the area c. 1948, and the a town plan showing the proposed school site in Valhalla Centre c. 1952.
 
Valhalla Centre, ‘Old Northfield School’, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Old Northfield School was part of the Valhalla Centre School District (#3130).
Location: 0063.02.100.1
Valhalla Centre, ‘Old “Old Post” School’, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Old “Old Post” School was part of the Valhalla Centre School District (#3130).
Location: 0063.02.100.2
Valhalla Centre School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A Valhalla Centre school (district #3130) constructed from cement and with a shed roof.
Location: 0063.02.100.3
Valhalla Centre School Outbuildings, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn and outhouse on the Valhalla Centre school property.
Location: 0063.02.100.4
Valhalla Centre School, 1957
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A modern multiroomed school from the Valhalla Centre district (#3130).
Location: 0063.02.100.5
 
Land plan for Valhalla School District, 1950 c.
land plan
showing families in the area around Valhalla
Location: 0063.02.100.1
Valhalla School, 1950 c.
blueprint
town plan of Valhalla showing the proposed location of Valhalla School
Location: 0063.02.100.2
SubSeries 063.02.101Wapiti School District 2802. — 1930-1957. — 5 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs.The Wapiti School District No. 2802 was located in the Bear Lake Municipality on four square miles of land: sections 3 through 10 and 15 through 22 in township 71, range 7, west of the 6th meridian. It covered the Spring Creek area and was formed in 1912 under the name of Graystone School District No. 2802. In 1913, the name was officially changed to Wapiti School District No. 2802, and a school was built on the NE 8-71-7-W6. The first teacher at Wapiti School was Mrs. C. Taylor. Other teachers included Miss Marion McNaught, Miss Margarite Johnson, Mr. R.W. Lickelt, Mrs. Maude Clifford, David Hunter, Miss Jennie Sundberg, Miss H.M. Robson, Mrs. O.L Simmons, Miss M.M. McDonald, Miss J.M. Redig, Miss Bailey, Miss Mallory, and Miss Eunice Holmes, all before the end of 1925. Later teachers were Anne Foss, Evelyn Roberts, Hazel Hartman, Mr. A. McQuarrie, Doris Campbell, Whitney Fletcher, Ellen Lewis, Fred Howlett, Mike Miller, Jeanne Westendorf, Noreen O’Connell, Raymonde Roberts, Marie Jubinville, Vernon McNamee, Ingebjorge Olsson, Eileen Murray, Tom Shannon, J.L. McIntosh, Mabel Wallace, Anne Matheson, Ursula Pankow, Verna Luckey, Edna Kiselczuk, Pat Grant and A. Dowhan. A new school building was erected in 1937, and when the student population became too large for the one-roomed school, classes were also taught in the Dimsdale Hall. The Wapiti School closed with consolidation in 1955.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. Photographs are of a white frame school with a full basement, a white frame teacherage, and a wood frame barn.
 
Wapiti School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Wapiti school house (district #2802) opened in 1912 and closed with consolidation in 1955.
Location: 0063.02.101.1
Wapiti Teacherage, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Wapiti school teacherage.
Location: 0063.02.101.2
Wapiti School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A barn on the Wapiti school property.
Location: 0063.02.101.3
SubSeries 063.02.102Webster Trail School District 4812. — 1937-1958. — 6 cm of textual records. — 1 photographs.Webster Trail School District #4812 was established in 1938. Originally, school was held in the front rooms of Emil Arac’s frame house. By March 1, 1938, there were 13 pupils attending Emil’s house for school with Mrs. Clarkson as teacher. In 1939, a new school building was located on Pete Dedio’s quarter. Gordon Stewart, farmer/teacher, rang the bell that fall. During WW II, teachers were scarce and correspondence was supervised. Just before the end of WW II, the teacher situation improved and teachers taught at Webster Trail School until 1954. The children were then bussed to a larger school at Teepee Creek. The Webster Trail schoolhouse was sold in 1956.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school trustees, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education. It includes detailed records of the grants and building process of the school c. 1939 and one photograph of the frame school.
 
Webster Trail School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The Webster Trail school house (district #4812) was opened in 1939 until 1954 when it was closed with consolidation. The students were then bussed to a larger school at Teepee Creek to continue their studies.
Location: 0063.02.102.1
SubSeries 063.02.103Wellington School District 3636. — 1937-1958. — 1 cm of textual records.The Wellington School District No. 3636, organized in 1919, consisted of a strip of land about two miles wide by six miles long between the Sexsmith and Clairmont School Districts. The first school was built on skids in the Gudlaugson farmyard, as five of the six children attending were from that family. Two years later the school was moved to N.E. 6-73-5, then to N.E. 31-72-5 ca. 1925. On this site, a new and larger school was built on a cement foundation. The first teacher was a young man just out of Normal School, Oliver Loptson. Other teachers included Miss Roche, Jessie McDonald, Miss Neilly, Nell Kent, Myrtle Dixon, Hazel Dixon, Marion Dixon, Edna Shore, Mr. Bullis, Mr. Byrnes, Rae King (Mrs. Andy Dolemo), Mrs. Dave Thompson, and Myrtle Tolley (Mrs. Jack Brown). Wellington School served the community until centralization forced its closure in the 1940s.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the Department of Education. There are also two diplomas for the “Best Exhibit at the School Fair” in 1932-1933.
SubSeries 063.02.104Wembley School District 3567. — 1931-1955. — 1 cm of textual records.Wembley School grew out of the original log building that was known as Hillhead School. Hillhead School was established in 1917 and was situated on the south-east corner of the Myrham Stewart homestead. The first teacher was Margaret McNaught. A new one room school building was constructed shortly after opening the first school. Some of the teachers’ names were Isobel McNaught (Perry), Mona Foy, Capt. R.E. Campbell, and Fred Barber. To meet the needs of the rapidly expanding village of Wembley, the Hillhead School was moved to Wembley in 1925. A second room was constructed in 1925–1926, and a new four room school (the Wembley School) was completed during 1930. Grades one to five continued to attend the old two room school while grades six through twelve attended the new school. Teachers at this new school included Mel Fowler, Helen Bromley ( Fowler), Ruth Robertson (Stokke), Mary Robertson, Mr and Mrs Whenham, Mr. McClung, Miss Kitlitz, Mr. Davidson, Mr. Sagert, Louella Phillips, Doreen Feist, Rhoda Patterson, Mrs. Storm, Mr. Rigby, Miss Ballantyne (Johnson), Mr. Wenstob and Mrs Bunyan. During 1954, a new school was built consisting of six classrooms, gym, science lab, typing room and administration office. The last students of the four room school were moved into the new school that year.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school inspectors, school boards, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.105West End School District 4592. — 1932-1937. — 0.5 cm of textual records.West End School District was established in the early 30s, when families settled west of the Caribou School District, just inside the BC border. The first meeting was held at the home of Eldon Best on April 14th, 1932 to determine community support for a West End School. The School Board held their first meeting on May 12th, 1932 to delegate overseeing the building of the new school, and the next meeting was held in the newly constructed West End School on January 7th, 1933. The school started with 18 children from 5 families. A school barn was also built in 1933. West End School District #4592 became part of Grande Prairie School District #14 in 1937. Teachers were Margaret Stewart, Ella Holtz and Margaret Hardisty.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school board, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education.
SubSeries 063.02.106West Hythe School District 4279. — 1930-1962. — 3 cm of textual records. — 3 photographs. — 1 maps.West Hythe School was organized in 1924, and a new 30 pupil school built in 1928 on the north west corner of 10-73-11 W6. A school barn was added in November 1928. The first teacher at this school was Mrs. L. Woods. Other teachers that followed were N. W. Bergman, Gladys Jameson, Miss Peck, Mrs. L. Woods, and Miss Bessie Walker. Miss Walker taught until 1940, when West Hythe came under Grande Prairie School Division No. 14. The last teachers at West Hythe were Miss Drosdiack, Mrs. Anderson, Mrs. Sharkey, Mrs. Dolemo, Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Hartley.The sub-series consists of correspondence between school board, teachers, parents, school division and the department of Education. A hand-drawn land plan shows families in the district c. 1930. Photographs are of a white frame school, a red frame barn with addition, and a wood-frame shed.
 
West Hythe School, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The West Hythe School District (#4279) was established in 1924 and the West Hythe School was built four years later on the north west corner of 10-73-11 W6.
Location: 0063.02.106.1
West Hythe School Barn, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
The West Hythe school barn was built in 1928.
Location: 0063.02.106.2
West Hythe School Shed, 1950 c.
1 photograph; b & w; 3 x 5 in.
A wood framed shed on the West Hythe School property.
Location: 0063.02.106.3
 
West Hythe School District Route Map, 1950 c.
plan
Proposed bus route
Location: 0063.02.106.4
Series 063.03Financial Records series. — 1920-1981. — 1 cm of textual records.The series consists of a 1949 Budget Report Form from the East Smoky School Division No. 49 and financial statements from the Grande Prairie School District No. 14 (1938-1950).
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