Keeping the Roads Clear

Another bright idea for farmers from the city folks in Edmonton!  Farmers using wider sleighs in the winter would be a cost effective way to keep roads open, according to the Edmonton Good Roads Association, reducing the heavy burden of taxes to pay for drags and snowplows.  The Association planned to petition the government to enact regulations to ensure the use of wide bench sleighs as a means of keeping winter roads open.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ January 26, 1925

A Trapped Trapper

When a large bear took over his cabin, Jim Fells of Bezanson retreated to the attic, where he was trapped until the next day. His rescuers didn’t believe there was a big bear in the cabin which wouldn’t leave, so Jim shot at the bear with his .22. When the bear attempted to leave the cabin through a window, the visitors believed him!

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger
The Herald Tribune – Jan 31, 1946

Photo description – Cabin in Winter, [1915]
A cabin in winter showing icicles along the roof edge.
Location: 0344.02.07

A Beaverlodge Soldier’s Christmas Party

David, Mary Jean, and Jim Carlisle decorate their Christmas tree, 1939

For the last post of this year, I found this feel-good story which shows why Canadian soldiers still hold a place in the hearts of the Dutch people.  Thanks everyone for your interest in the blog this year, and I look forward to continuing it in 2017.

Captain Don Little of Beaverlodge organized a party for seventy-five Dutch children with the help of his unit.  The men even sewed little cloth bags for the treats, which were contributed from their own Christmas parcels.  Sinterklaas and Black Pete attended the party, which was the first for the children in several years.  In appreciation, the soldiers were presented with a little dog named Dutchy as a mascot for their unit.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald-Tribune ~ January 4, 1945

A Christmas Extravaganza on the Radio

Many adjectives are used in this article to describe the Christmas Day radio programming being planned by the Canadian Radio Commission – unheard of, daring, thrilling.  It was to begin with the Christmas message from King George V.  There would also be choirs, interviews, and stories from across Canada, requiring the services of over 1000 people and technicians and using 32 000 miles of wire.  I wonder if it lived up to this report.  As a sign of our times, I looked and you could actually listen to King George’s speech on YouTube.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 20, 1935

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 20, 1935

A Different Kind of Christmas Gift

Blood transfusions seem to still have been a bit unconventional in the area, even though blood typing, a key in the process, was discovered in 1910.  It is gratifying that so many citizens volunteered for the testing, and the surgery to help the man who was ill was a success.  It is certainly one of the medical procedures we may take for granted, but volunteers still have to come forward to donate blood.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 15, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 15, 1933

Dashing Through the Snow

This dash through the snow was not in a sleigh, but on foot, by a young fellow who had just robbed the pool hall.  He apparently didn’t think about being tracked by the intrepid Constable Burgess, who was even able to match boot prints in the snow to the perpetrator.  I was surprised at the high bail.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 15, 1933

Grande Prairie Herald ~ December 15, 1933

A Stuck Duck

With the cold weather we’ve been having, we can sympathize with the little duck who got his tail frozen in the ice at Flying Shot Lake.  Lucky for him some people were out skating and he was rescued.  Interesting that the first place they they took him was to the newspaper office.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald-Tribune ~ December 8, 1949

The Herald-Tribune ~ December 8, 1949

He Wasn’t Actually Lost…

This story about the search for men lost in the bush around Nose Mountain involved mill workers, RCMP, Indian trackers, a Dakota search plane, parachutists, and the first helicopter to land at the Grande Prairie Airport.  One man found his own way back to the road, and the other said that he hadn’t been lost at all.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

The Herald-Tribune ~ December 8, 1949

The Herald-Tribune ~ December 8, 1949

What the World Needs Now…

This list of inventions needed by the world is a bit odd, with some fairly practical suggestions as well as some strange ones – why would the world need an aeroplane that could be managed easily by a youngster?  Many items from the list do exist now, such as highly efficient furnaces, bendable glass, and talking movies, which were introduced the same year this list was published.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 12, 1923

Grande Prairie Herald ~ June 12, 1923

Fashions in Farming – The Tractor Farmers

The Teepee Creek news correspondent looked around the neighbourhood and began to wonder if there was something to be said for power farming. The writer appears to have been one who favoured farming with horses, but was beginning to have some doubts. The references to the Wheat Pool seem to hint at dissatisfaction with the organization. Since its founding  in 1923, the Pool had had its ups and downs and not all the member farmers agreed with some of its policies and practices.

Researched & written by Kathryn Auger

Photograph description – Arnold Christianson with his discing outfit, a steel wheeled tractor and disc, 1928.

teepee-creek-1

The Grande Prairie Herald Nov 1, 1929

The Grande Prairie Herald Nov 1, 1929