Soldier Spotlight: Lance Corporal David Burrows

Image: David Burrows, 1940 (SPRA 2005.094.06)

Regimental No.: M.104378
Rank: Lance Corporal

At the age of 3, David Burrows came to Canada with his parents, Robert and Mary (Pollock), and siblings from Scotland, in 1927. They settled in the Glen Leslie district by Bezanson AB and operated a farm. David attended the Somme School from 1931 to 1939. He remained on the home farm until he enlisted in WW II service on October 14, 1942 in Grande Prairie. ( 7 Burrows/ Pollock siblings served in WW II). First he was in Edmonton for basic training, and then on December 29th, 1942 he left for Chilliwack BC for advance training until September 1943. Next, he took army training in Hamilton ON, returned to Chilliwack, and then to Truro, NS. Once in England, he was involved in the invasion of Normandy at Juno Beach, and then went into Caen. Later, he went to France and Holland, again to England, before returning home in 1945.

While posted overseas, he met and married his wife, Iris, in England. When they returned to Canada, they resided in Grande Prairie where David’s jobs included driving a horse-drawn milk wagon, and working at Imperial Motors. In 1956 the family returned to England. David and Iris had 3 children: Pete, John, and Judy. David passed away on February 6, 2014 in Grande Prairie at age 89.

Source:
Smoky River to Grande Prairie p. 448
p. 422 Photo as a child with 3 siblings, George, Leslie and Helen
SPRA Family
Reference Files – (information by Helen Burrows Horrigan (sister)).
-Obituary
-Photo of David in uniform

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Nursing Sister Edith Fredette

Image: Group photograph of the Grande Prairie Ladies’ Curling Club posed with rocks and brooms. Edith is second from right in the back row. ca. 1925 (SPRA 032.08.08.0767)

Regimental Number: 8547
Rank: Nursing Sister
Branch: No. 5 Canadian General Hospital, Canadian Army Medical Corps

Edith Louise Hibbs was born on November 14, 1889 in Montreal and was a nurse living in London when she signed up for military service in September of 1915. Her attestation paper describes her as having fair hair and blue eyes. Edith served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps and was soon sent to Malta, where the conditions coupled with the climate took a toll on soldiers and medical staff alike. Edith was no exception. She contracted malaria in November of 1916 and is noted as being sick with it at least four more times. Edith also saw service in Turkey and the Dardanelles. She was discharged from service after her last bout with it in 1917. Edith was then invalided back to England where she continued to work in the hospitals for the duration of the war. Edith was awarded the Royal Red Cross by King George V at Buckingham Palace on April 28, 1919 – an honour that was awarded in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth for exceptional services in military nursing. Edith came to the Peace Country upon a request made to her by Dr. Lewis J. O’Brien, whom she had met during her military service. Dr. O’Brien offered Edith the job of matron of the Katherine Prittie Hospital in Grande Prairie. Edith agreed and left her job at Summerland, B.C. Conditions were primitive at the log pioneer hospital that had no running water or power and a telephone that shut off at midnight. In 1929 a new hospital was built with a larger capacity, improved facilities, and modern equipment. Edith continued in her old position becoming the first matron of the new hospital. In 1929, Edith married the local veterinarian Dr. Louis Fredette and gave up her position as matron. They had a daughter, Hope. Louis died in 1960 and Edith in 1964.

Source: Grande Prairie: Capitol of the Peace p. 97

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Private Raymond Boyer

Image: Ray Boyer, the soldier on the right, in Amsterdam in May, 1945. Behind is the first “Butter Boat” that arrived after the end of the war. (SPRA 445.01.22)

Regiment: Seaforth Highlanders – 1st Canadian Division
Regimental Number: K 737
Rank: Private

Ray Boyer was born December 11, 1924 in Grande Prairie, AB, and raised in East Kleskun on a farm on the south banks of Kleskun Lake (NE 35-72-4 W6). His father, Isaac, came to the Peace country from South Dakota and travelled over the Edson Trail in 1912. His mother, Bertha Delaney, a widow with six children, came to the Peace country from Ontario in 1919 and married Isaac Boyer. Along with his three- half sisters and three half-brothers, Ray also had an older brother, an older sister and a younger brother making up their family of ten children. Ray started his education in the East Kleskun School in 1930. The school was located 3.5 miles from their farm so it was a treat when he could ride a horse, especially in winter. Midway through grade school, Rays’s older brother, Clarence became the lead brother on the farm as their father was an invalid in his later years due to arthritis. Ray’s mother and the younger children were responsible for milking the cows, tending animals and other chores.

At the age of fifteen, Ray had to quit school and go to work to help support the family. One of his first jobs was to deliver water and ice to residences in Grande Prairie with a team of Pat Croken’s horses. He also remembers working in George Vagt’s Butcher Shop in Grande Prairie making wieners and sausage in a smoke house in the back alley. For the next three years Ray worked on different jobs including hauling gasoline up the Alaska Highway as far as Watson Lake. In 1943, Ray left for Vancouver and joined the Canadian Army. From Vancouver, he went to Wetaskiwin for Basic Training, then to Calgary for Advanced Training, and eventually to England where he took Signal Training. As a member of the Seaforth Highlanders First Division, Ray landed in Italy at Avaleno. From there Ray was sent to the front lines where troops relieved the Royal 22 Regiment of Quebec and Ray remembers seeing his first badly wounded soldier. They advanced north of Russi and in Bagnacavello, Italy, and in 1944 spent Christmas with a dinner in a church. At this time Ray was thrilled to meet up with his brothers Clarence and Archie close to the Senio River.

After Italy, the Highlanders were trucked to Holland. They crossed rivers in “Buffalos” which were floating tanks. Once after getting across, they were fired on and Ray remembers lying behind a dead cow for protection. They were continuing to advance through two towns in Holland when the news came that the Germans had surrendered. The Seaforths were then stationed in Amsterdam and Ray finally came home to Vancouver in May, 1946. Back in Grande Prairie, Ray worked different jobs: hauling lumber, working a dozer and a caterpillar and survey work. In 1953, Ray married Rita Robideau and they had three sons: Eldon, Doug and Arnie. Ray began working for the County of Grande Prairie in 1954 and remained there until 1985. He served on County Council, and numerous Boards including South Peace Health, Education, Planning, Evergreen Park, and the Agricultureal Society.

Ray wound down his career working as a Landman for Roy Northern working with landowners for approval of well sites, pipelines and right of ways. In 2000, Ray was the proud recipient of “Senior of the Year” from the Alberta Government. Ray has volunteered much of his retirement years developing the historic site at Kleskun Hill Museum. In 2001, Ray and his youngest son, Arnie, took a three week trip to Europe to revisit many of the sites he had been to during WWII.

Ray died in Grande Prairie on August 1, 2012.

Source: Rita Boyer
SPRA Family and Personal Life Reference Files (Obituary and news article)
Smoky River to Grande Prairie p. 119

Ray Boyer fonds

Ray Boyer photographs

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Private Frederick Anderton

Image: Notes about Frederick’s military career from his military service file (Library & Archives Canada)

Regimental Number: 2684153
Rank: Corporal (reverted from Corporal to Private on June 24, 1918)
Branch: RNWMP; Canadian Light Horse

Frederick was born on December 17, 1889 in Claybrook, England. Prior to coming to Canada, he served with the Leicestershire Constabulary from 1910 until 1912. He joined the RNWMP at Regina on August 9, 1913 and continued to serve until 1937, apart from the time spent in the army during World War I. In 1915 he went to Fort Good Hope in search of two priests who were thought to have been murdered. At this time he was a sergeant in the Grande Prairie Detachment of the RNWMP. He enlisted in the RNWMP unit in 1918 and went overseas to serve in France. He arrived exactly one month before the Armistice and saw action in France and Belgium before being discharged on March 13, 1919. Anderton Channel in the NWT was named after him. Frederick died in Surrey, BC on October 20, 1974.

Source: Grande Prairie: Capitol of the Peace p. 56; RCMP Graves Database

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

Soldier Spotlight: Sergeant Alexander Burrows

Image: Alexander Burrows, 1940 (SPRA 2005.094.04)

Regiment: 49th Loyal Edmonton Regiment
Regiment No.: M16403
Rank: S/Sgt

Alexander Burrows came to Canada from Scotland in 1927 with his father, Robert Burrows, and stepmother Mary (Pollock) Burrows , and siblings at age 9. They settled in the Glen Leslie district (near Bezanson AB) and he and his siblings attended the Somme School. Alec worked for several people in the community. Together with his brother Tom, he homesteaded in Fitzsimmons (in Bezanson area). On September 14, 1939 Alec enlisted in the 49th Edmonton Regiment to serve in WW II. ( 7 Burrows/Pollock siblings enlisted in the war.) He sailed for England on Oct. 15, 1939. In 1940 he headed to Norway, then England and Scotland. He was engaged in a raid on Spitzbergen, north of Norway. July 1941 they were successful in landing, and destroyed the coal mines and oil wells. He sailed to the Middle East in July 1943 to invade Sicily. In August 1943 he moved to Italy to fight in the battle of Ortona, and he was wounded and evacuated to the 13th General Hospital (Canadian) in North Africa. Returning to UK in 1944, he stayed at a camp at Aldershot before he was repatriated to Canada. While overseas in England he met and married his wife, Winnie. They had 4 children: Margaret, Janet, James, and Ian. The Burrows moved to Montreal and later to Ottawa. Alec died at age 80 on July 23, 1998 in Ottawa, and the remains of his cremation were buried in Grande Prairie AB.

I, Sargent Burrows (M16403) enlisted with the 49th Loyal Edmonton Regiment, Sept. 14, 1939. I sailed for England in an advance party of the 1st Division on Oct 15, 1939. In 1940 I went to Dunfermline to embark for Norway as the Germans had invaded from the south. I was back in England, prior to Dunkirk. I returned to Scotland to attend a commando course under the command of Lord Lovatt. I returned to England and prepared for the raid on Spitzbergen, located north of Norway, 500 miles inside the Arctic Circle. German Atlantic fleet had been using the island for a refueling base. 130 of our division were chosen to take part in the raid. In July, 1941, we were successful in landing and destroying the coal mines and oil wells. The Russian peasants were taken to Archangel, Russia and when we returned to Spitzbergen we loaded the Norwegians and brought them to Scotland. Not a living thing was left on the island. In July, 1943, we embarked and sailed to the Middle East to invade Sicily. In August, 1943,we moved into Italian mainland, fought our way up the mainland to Ortona in central Italy. I was wounded and evacuated to the 13th General Hospital (Canadian) in North Africa. In 1944, I returned to the UK and was posted to a camp at Aldershot where all Canadians were held prior to repatriation to Canada. I returned to Calgary and home.

Source: Smoky River to Grande Prairie p. 448 p. 422
Grande Prairie Daily Herald Tribune July 28, 1998 – Obituary
SPRA Family Reference Files – information written by Helen Burrows Horrigan (sister)
– Photo

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

From the Vault Friday: Holiday Cards

Image: SPRA 179.03.07

Todays “From the Vault Friday” features a selection of winter holiday cards. The first artifact is a Christmas card with a photo of Mary Davis with her children Vera, Ira and Evelyn circa 1942 from the Mary Belcourt Davis fonds (Fonds 179)

Image: SPRA 992.48.009b

The second is a card from the Grant Family fonds (Fonds 136).

Read more about the Mary Belcourt Davis fonds (fonds 1790 here.

Read more about the Grant Family (Fonds 136) here.

From the Vault Friday is a social media campaign that highlights interesting materials from the collections of the South Peace Regional Archives. This project was made possible by an Access to Holdings Grant from the Archives Society of Alberta.

Soldier Spotlight: Eva Somerville

Image: Participants at the 1936 Oldtimers’ Picnic at Lake Saskatoon. Standing: I. V. Macklin, James Somerville holding his daughter’s hand, Mrs. Somerville, Mrs. Lorna Horte, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Flint, James McFarlane, and Charles Cowpar. In the car: Bert Bessent and his twins Bob and Bill. On running boards: Mr. and Mrs. Henry Roberts. Sitting: Alice Sutherland, Mrs. J. Sutherland, Walter McFarlane, Mrs. Evelyn McRae, Fred Roberts, Mrs. Elsie Bessent, Pauline Johnson, Henry Monkman, Mrs. Fred Roberts, Mrs. Monkman, and George Tait. (SPRA 032.08.08.0566)

Branch: St. John Ambulance

Eva was born in England in 1894. She worked with St John Ambulance during World War I (her uniform and nursing manuals are in the Grande Prairie Museum). In November of 1927, Eva came to the South Peace to meet Jim Somerville, with whom she had been corresponding. They were married in Grande Prairie on December 21, 1927. Eva died in July of 1974.

Sources: surname file; Buffalo Trails p. 66; From Survey to Today p. 38

Jim & Eva Somerville, 1968 (SPRA 178.03.10)

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

From the Vault Friday: Carte de Noel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images: SPRA 006.04.01.p03a, 006.04.01.p03b

Todays “From the Vault Friday” features a winter holiday card, from the Madeline Hanni-Lozeron sub-series of Pierre Lozeron family fonds (fonds 006).  Madeline Lozeron, born in 1878, was 32 when her younger brothers Pierre and Jean left Switzerland in 1910. The card was sent to her brothers in Nebraska circa 1910-1912.

She married Monsieur Hanni of Auvergne, had two children, Marguerite and Andre, and passed away in 1960 at the age of 82.The sub-series consist of postcards, letters and funeral records sent from the Hanni-Lozeron family to Pierre Lozeron in the United States and later Canada, from the time he left Switzerland. After Madeline’s death in 1960, later news of the family (such as funeral records) was sent by Pierre’s daughter-in-law Christianne in Switzerland.

Read more about the Lozeron family fonds (fonds 006) here.

View a selection of photos from the Pierre Lozeron family fonds on Alberta On Record.

From the Vault Friday is a social media campaign that highlights interesting materials from the collections of the South Peace Regional Archives. This project was made possible by an Access to Holdings Grant from the Archives Society of Alberta.

Soldier Spotlight: Lance Corporal Roy Oliver Boyd

Image: A platoon of army recruits in training on parade along Richmond Ave. In the background are Imperial Bank of Canada, J.B. Oliver furniture store, Hudson Bay Raw Furs, Porteous Hardware, James Drug store. 1943 (SPRA 2005.052.01)

Regiment: Loyal Edmonton Regiment
Rank: Lance Corporal

Roy Boyd was born and grew up in the Wembley AB area. In October 1940 he enlisted for service in WWII in Grande Prairie. At first he joined the Edmonton Fusiliers, and then transferred to the Loyal Edmonton Regiment. For one and a half years he was posted overseas in England, North Africa, Sicily, and Italy. Roy was injured on December 26, 1943 in the Battle of Ortona in Italy and was the lone survivor of an Edmonton Platoon that was blown up by German pioneers. Roy was rescued after being buried for three and a half days and spent five months in Italian and English hospitals. He spent another year in hospitals back in Canada in Calgary and Edmonton. On December 24, 1944 Roy married Beryl Perves who was also from Wembley. He was discharged from the armed forces in July 1945, and shortly afterwards bought his father’s home quarter of land. The couple lived there until 1956 when they moved into Wembley. In 1968 they relocated to Grande Prairie. The Boyds had 7 children: Cheryl, Donna, David, Valerie, Vivian, Marilyn and Susan. Roy was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion. He passed away on January 16, 1985 at age 64 in Grande Prairie, and he was buried in the Lake Saskatoon Cemetery in Wembley.

Source:
Along the Wapiti p. 412 – Name listed in WW II Veterans
p. 338
Grande Prairie AGS – Obituary Index, Cemetery Index

Soldier Spotlight highlights veterans from the Archives’ online Soldiers’ Memorial. Each week, our volunteers select a remarkable individual to showcase in this blog series. The Soldiers’ Memorial commemorates more than 1,100 WWI veterans and 2,300 WWII veterans from our region. Three dedicated volunteers have contributed over 1,200 hours to this project by researching and writing biographies. Our goal is to have all South Peace soldiers acknowledged for their service. If you know of someone who lived in the South Peace and should be listed on the Memorial, or would like to get involved by researching a local veteran, please contact the Archives.

From the Vault Friday: Holly Wreath Cookie Recipe

Images: SPRA 129.07.01

Todays “From the Vault Friday” features a recipe from the Betty Welter fonds (fonds 129).

Elizabeth Smart was born in Bassano, Alberta in 1921, the daughter of Archie Smart and his English War Bride, Mable. Mr. Smart had immigrated to Canada from Bristol, England in 1901 and, after working on projects throughout Canada, the States and Central America, settled in Southern Alberta. As well as farming and market gardening, he worked with the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Patricia-Brooks irrigation project. In 1928, the family moved north to the Flying Shot Lake District in the Peace River Country.

Betty started school in Patricia, Alberta, but grades 2 through 8 were spent at the one-roomed Flying Shot Lake School. Grades 9 and 10 were completed by correspondence through the Western Canada Institute, part of it under very difficult circumstances after her mother passed away in 1938. In 1939, after a year at home, keeping house for her father and two younger siblings, Betty went on to Vermilion Agricultural College for 2 years and obtained a Home Economics Degree. She became an expert cook, seamstress and craftsperson.

Do you have any recipes that have been passed down through the generations?

The recipe is transcribed below:

Holly Wreath Cookies

2/3 c shortening

2/3 c granulated sugar

2 eggs, well beaten

1 tsp vanilla

3 ½ c bread flour

3 c cake flour

½ tsp salt

1 ½ tsp baking powder

Method

Cream shortening, add sugar gradually. Cream together, add eggs + vanilla + mix. Mix + sift the dry ingredients + add. Chill the dough + roll out to 1/8” thick on lightly floured board. Cut with a floured doughnut cutter into Xmas wreaths. Decorate with some pieces of candied cherry or citron to represent a Holly wreath. Arrange on a greased baking sheet and bake in oven 400° for 10-12 minutes. This recipe makes about 45 wreaths.

—–End of transcription—–

Read more about the Betty Welter fonds (fonds 129) here.

View a selection of photos from the Betty Welter fonds (fonds 129) on Alberta On Record.

From the Vault Friday is a social media campaign that highlights interesting materials from the collections of the South Peace Regional Archives. This project was made possible by an Access to Holdings Grant from the Archives Society of Alberta.