10 Trends from the 1910s

The Great War Gala is now only a month away, so today we have ten trends from the 1910s to get you started on your wardrobe journey. Don’t forget to visit the Archives to purchase your tickets!


Suits You

Lucky for our male attendees, men’s fashion has remained largely unchanged since the 1910s. Consider the Great War Gala the perfect opportunity to purchase the new suit you have been eyeing.

Source: Lake Saskatoon Journal, 2 April 1918

Men’s Hats

The men of Clairmont knew to visit Coblentz’s store for the most up-to-date hats. The Great War Gala takes place only a handful of weeks before Halloween – visit any costume to add a hat and cane to your evening outfit.

Source: Lake Saskatoon Journal, 9 April 1918

Posh Pastels 

You may not be returning to Oxford in the fall, but you can still embrace the pastel summer tones, showcased here in Testament of Youth. Add a belt over a pastel top to create a low-effort 1910s look, direct from your wardrobe.

Source: Testament of Youth (The Telegraph)

Summer Shoes

The fashionable folk of the 1910s purchased new shoes for sports and social outings. As leather prices increased during the war years, canvas shoes became a popular alternative. Many modern flats still follow these trends!

Source: Lake Saskatoon Journal, 22 June 1917

Straw Hats

Although it may be difficult to locate in today’s department stores, a straw hat would have been a staple in the fashionable man’s summer wardrobe.

Source: Lake Saskatoon Journal, 1 June 1917

Matching Hats 

Consider adding an Edwardian hat to your colourful frock. To DIY this look, purchase a large summer hat on clearance and cover it with inexpensive fabric. For extra flair, consider adding feathers, ribbons, or flowers.

Source: Mr Selfridge (PBS Masterpiece

Delaine for Days

Delaine is a lightweight fabric of wool or wool blend made in prints or solid colors. This fabric was ideal for creating clothing items from scratch. If you are feeling ambitious, consider visiting a local fabric store and purchasing materials to create your outfit “the old fashioned way.” You can find plenty of 1910s sewing patterns online.

Source: Lake Saskatoon Journal, 9 April 1918

Sport Clothes

“Sport Shoes with Sport Clothes… That’s the vogue.” Recreate this ensemble by wrapping a colorful scarf around a long jacket. Secure your new belt with a large broach and voila!

Source: Lake Saskatoon Journal, 4 July 1917

White Gloves

No garden party ensemble would be complete without a pair of white gloves. Many costume shops stock these gloves for Halloween, so you can likely find them with little difficulty.

Source: Downton Abbey (PBS Masterpiece

Layers for Ladies

The 1910s upper class ladies began their day by donning numerous layers of undergarments. For true historical accuracy, be sure to don each undergarment (and a corset, of course). You’ll be classy, but not necessarily comfortable.


Source: “Svensk-tysk ordbok” (Wikimedia Commons)